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Austenitizing Temperature

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Yuhong Zhao – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • effect of Austenitizing Temperature on the mechanical properties of high strength maraging steel
    Materials Science and Engineering A-structural Materials Properties Microstructure and Processing, 2013
    Co-Authors: L Qi, Yuhong Zhao

    Abstract:

    Abstract This paper investigates the effect of Austenitizing Temperature on mechanical properties of X00CrNiCoMo9-9-5-3 corrosion resistant maraging steel. The results show that solution treatment recrystallization Temperature of this experimental steel is 850 °C. After a solution treatment below 850 °C, the experimental steel will change to form austenite via the non-dispersive phase transition from α′ to γ, which inherits the forging structure high density defects. Then the experimental steel can cool to form high strength martensitic steel. Moreover, high hardness austenite increases the resistance to phase transition in the cooling process and increases the content of retained austenite, thus guaranteeing excellent low Temperature toughness of maraging steel.

Hoon Kwon – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • influences of co addition and Austenitizing Temperature on secondary hardening and impact fracture behavior in p m high speed steels of w mo cr v co system
    Materials Science and Engineering A-structural Materials Properties Microstructure and Processing, 2008
    Co-Authors: H K Moon, Hoon Kwon

    Abstract:

    Abstract The secondary hardening and fracture behavior in P/M high speed steels of W–Mo–Cr–V(–Co) system has been investigated in terms of Co addition and Austenitizing Temperature. Austenitizing was conducted at 1100 and 1175 °C of relatively low and high Temperatures, respectively. Tempering was performed in the range of 500–600 °C. Coarse primary carbides retained after heat treatment were V-rich MC and W–Mo-rich M6C types. Since the dissolution of W–Mo-rich M6C with relatively low stability was more promoted with increasing Austenitizing Temperature, the alloy content of the W and Mo in the matrix was enhanced. In turn, it gives a significant influence on the precipitation of fine secondary alloy carbides, that is, secondary hardening during tempering. The major secondary carbides were W–Mo–Cr-rich M2C type. The peak hardness was observed in the tempering range of 500–540 °C, depending on Co addition and Austenitizing Temperature. With an increase in Austenitizing Temperature, the aging deceleration was observed. This phenomenon may be attributed to the increased content of W and Mo in the matrix, both diffusing slowly in the matrix and inhibiting growth of M2C carbide, as compared to Cr. In addition, the aging acceleration occurred in the Co bearing alloy, promoting the precipitation of M2C carbides, as well as the overall increase in hardness. In general, the impact toughness was decreased with an increase in hardness. In addition, the impact toughness to hardness balance was lowered in the Co bearing alloy.

  • Influences of Co addition and Austenitizing Temperature on secondary hardening and impact fracture behavior in P/M high speed steels of W–Mo–Cr–V(–Co) system
    Materials Science and Engineering A-structural Materials Properties Microstructure and Processing, 2008
    Co-Authors: H K Moon, Hoon Kwon

    Abstract:

    Abstract The secondary hardening and fracture behavior in P/M high speed steels of W–Mo–Cr–V(–Co) system has been investigated in terms of Co addition and Austenitizing Temperature. Austenitizing was conducted at 1100 and 1175 °C of relatively low and high Temperatures, respectively. Tempering was performed in the range of 500–600 °C. Coarse primary carbides retained after heat treatment were V-rich MC and W–Mo-rich M6C types. Since the dissolution of W–Mo-rich M6C with relatively low stability was more promoted with increasing Austenitizing Temperature, the alloy content of the W and Mo in the matrix was enhanced. In turn, it gives a significant influence on the precipitation of fine secondary alloy carbides, that is, secondary hardening during tempering. The major secondary carbides were W–Mo–Cr-rich M2C type. The peak hardness was observed in the tempering range of 500–540 °C, depending on Co addition and Austenitizing Temperature. With an increase in Austenitizing Temperature, the aging deceleration was observed. This phenomenon may be attributed to the increased content of W and Mo in the matrix, both diffusing slowly in the matrix and inhibiting growth of M2C carbide, as compared to Cr. In addition, the aging acceleration occurred in the Co bearing alloy, promoting the precipitation of M2C carbides, as well as the overall increase in hardness. In general, the impact toughness was decreased with an increase in hardness. In addition, the impact toughness to hardness balance was lowered in the Co bearing alloy.

Chao Zhao – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • influence of Austenitizing Temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of an fe cr ni mo ti maraging stainless steel
    Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance, 2019
    Co-Authors: Yong Lian, Jin Zhang, Jinfeng Huang, Zunjun Zhang, Chao Zhao

    Abstract:

    The influence of Austenitizing Temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of an Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo-Ti maraging stainless steel was investigated. The grain size, Laves phase, and retained austenite in steels given different solution treatments were observed using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Relationships with mechanical properties were measured by tensile testing. The grain growth rate was relatively slow at Temperatures of 800-1000 °C then rapidly increased at higher Temperatures. Low-Temperature austenitization augmented the retention of austenite, the fraction of which decreased with an increase in Austenitizing Temperature. The Laves phases, which precipitated in austenite during austenitization at 800-900 °C, were preserved after quenching. The solution treatment had a significant effect on the final tensile properties of the steel after aging, due to the presence of retained austenite and Laves phase reducing its strength.