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Authentication Credential

The Experts below are selected from a list of 111 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Simon Gibbs – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • DAuth: Fine-Grained Authorization Delegation for Distributed Web Application Consumers
    2010 IEEE International Symposium on Policies for Distributed Systems and Networks, 2010
    Co-Authors: Joshua Schiffman, Xinwen Zhang, Simon Gibbs

    Abstract:

    Web applications are becoming the predominant means by which users interact with online content. However, current Authentication approaches use a single Authentication Credential to manage access permissions, which is too inflexible for distributed programs with unique security and privacy requirements for each component. In this paper, we introduce DAuth, an authorization mechanism that allows fine-grained and flexible control of access permissions derived from a single Authentication Credential for distributed consumers of web applications. We implement DAuth as a proxy for a Twitter social networking application within our distributed Elastic Application framework and find it introduces negligible overhead and requires only minor modification of existing applications. Through our evaluation, we demonstrate DAuth improves on existing web Authentication mechanisms to support distributed web application consumers and can be implemented as a proxy to web applications that do not wish to develop their own implementation.

Joshua Schiffman – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • DAuth: Fine-Grained Authorization Delegation for Distributed Web Application Consumers
    2010 IEEE International Symposium on Policies for Distributed Systems and Networks, 2010
    Co-Authors: Joshua Schiffman, Xinwen Zhang, Simon Gibbs

    Abstract:

    Web applications are becoming the predominant means by which users interact with online content. However, current Authentication approaches use a single Authentication Credential to manage access permissions, which is too inflexible for distributed programs with unique security and privacy requirements for each component. In this paper, we introduce DAuth, an authorization mechanism that allows fine-grained and flexible control of access permissions derived from a single Authentication Credential for distributed consumers of web applications. We implement DAuth as a proxy for a Twitter social networking application within our distributed Elastic Application framework and find it introduces negligible overhead and requires only minor modification of existing applications. Through our evaluation, we demonstrate DAuth improves on existing web Authentication mechanisms to support distributed web application consumers and can be implemented as a proxy to web applications that do not wish to develop their own implementation.

  • POLICY – DAuth: Fine-Grained Authorization Delegation for Distributed Web Application Consumers
    2010 IEEE International Symposium on Policies for Distributed Systems and Networks, 2010
    Co-Authors: Joshua Schiffman, Xinwen Zhang, Simon J. Gibbs

    Abstract:

    Web applications are becoming the predominant means by which users interact with online content. However, current Authentication approaches use a single Authentication Credential to manage access permissions, which is too inflexible for distributed programs with unique security and privacy requirements for each component. In this paper, we introduce DAuth, an authorization mechanism that allows fine-grained and flexible control of access permissions derived from a single Authentication Credential for distributed consumers of web applications. We implement DAuth as a proxy for a Twitter social networking application within our distributed Elastic Application framework and find it introduces negligible overhead and requires only minor modification of existing applications. Through our evaluation, we demonstrate DAuth improves on existing web Authentication mechanisms to support distributed web application consumers and can be implemented as a proxy to web applications that do not wish to develop their own implementation.

Paul Steinbart – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • HICSS – Can Relaxing Security Policy Restrictiveness Improve User Behavior? A Field Study of Authentication Credential Usage
    2016 49th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS), 2016
    Co-Authors: Jeffry Babb, Mark J. Keith, Paul Steinbart

    Abstract:

    Often, security policies take an overly proscriptive approach designed to shape “secure” behavior in the specification of constraints, controls, and impediments to free action. In the case of very detailed policies, the user may not even understand the logic behind the behavior. This research poses a simple premise: if a desired state of system security can be achieved with a policy that affords the user a range of behavioral options, would the user be more likely to comply with the policy? We present findings from a field experiment in the context of password selection where secure behavior was enhanced by relaxing proscription (and prescription) by allowing universal cues in additional feedback tools to take precedence over explicit behavioral requirements. This is in keeping with aspects of Activity Theory which proposes that familiar tools influence actor-structure interactions that lead to desired outcomes.

  • Can Relaxing Security Policy Restrictiveness Improve User Behavior? A Field Study of Authentication Credential Usage
    2016 49th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS), 2016
    Co-Authors: Jeffry Babb, Mark Keith, Paul Steinbart

    Abstract:

    Often, security policies take an overly proscriptive approach designed to shape “secure” behavior in the specification of constraints, controls, and impediments to free action. In the case of very detailed policies, the user may not even understand the logic behind the behavior. This research poses a simple premise: if a desired state of system security can be achieved with a policy that affords the user a range of behavioral options, would the user be more likely to comply with the policy? We present findings from a field experiment in the context of password selection where secure behavior was enhanced by relaxing proscription (and prescription) by allowing universal cues in additional feedback tools to take precedence over explicit behavioral requirements. This is in keeping with aspects of Activity Theory which proposes that familiar tools influence actor-structure interactions that lead to desired outcomes.