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Automobile Engine

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C M Taylor – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Automobile Engine tribology approaching the surface
    Wear, 2000
    Co-Authors: M Priest, C M Taylor

    Abstract:

    There has been relentless pressure in the second half of the 20th century to develop ever more fuel efficient and compact Automobile Engines with reduced environmental impact. From the viewpoint of the tribologist this means increasing specific loads, speeds and temperatures for the major frictional components of the Engine, namely, the piston assembly, the valve train and the journal bearings, and lower viscosity Engine oils with which to lubricate them. Inevitably, this leads to decreasing oil film thicknesses between the interacting surfaces of these components and a more crucial role for the topography and surface profile of the two surfaces in determining tribological performance. This paper reviews the nature of the surfaces encountered in the piston assembly, valve train and journal bearings of the internal combustion Engine and how mathematical models of Engine tribology are endeavouring to cope with the extreme complexities the incorporation of surface topography potentially brings. Key areas for future research and the implications for design are highlighted.

  • Automobile Engine tribology design considerations for efficiency and durability
    Wear, 1998
    Co-Authors: C M Taylor

    Abstract:

    Abstract In the United Kingdom, the Technology Foresight Programme [HMSO, Progress Through Partnership 1 (1995) 126 pp.], through its Transport Panel, revealed the requirement for key generic technologies and scientific research in relation to Automobiles. One of the `three major development opportunities which will help accommodate increased demand in a sustainable way’ was identified as `vehicles with greater efficiency and reduced environmental impact’. In addition, further studies in `fuel efficiency’ and `simulation and modelling’ were recommended. The total scope of tribological considerations with regard to the above prospective research themes is immense and the present paper will focus upon the major frictional components of the Automobile Engine, that is, the bearings, the valve train and the piston assembly. In particular, the current position surrounding the modelling of these components will be reviewed and future possibilities identified. Prediction of overall Engine friction will be addressed and the specific issues of modelling of lubricant behaviour and the role of surface topography touched upon.

  • Automobile Engine tribology approaching the surface
    AUSTRIB ’98 Tribology at Work: Proceedings of the 5th International Tribology Conference in Australia Brisbane 6-9 December 1998, 1998
    Co-Authors: M Priest, C M Taylor

    Abstract:

    There has been relentless pressure in the second half of the twentieth century to develop ever more fuel efficient and compact Automobile Engines with reduced environmental impact. From the viewpoint of the tribologist this means increasing specific loads, speeds and temperatures for the major frictional components of the Engine, namely the piston assembly, the valve train and the journal bearings, and lower viscosity Engine oils with which to lubricate them. Inevitably, this leads to decreasing oil film thicknesses between the interacting surfaces of these components and a more crucial role for the topography and surface profile of the two surfaces in determining tribological performance. This paper will review the nature of the surfaces encountered in the piston assembly, valve train and journal bearings of the internal combustion Engine and how mathematical models of Engine tribology are endeavouring to cope with the extreme complexities the incorporation of surface topography potentially brings. Key areas for future research and the implications for design will be highlighted.

M Priest – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Automobile Engine tribology approaching the surface
    Wear, 2000
    Co-Authors: M Priest, C M Taylor

    Abstract:

    There has been relentless pressure in the second half of the 20th century to develop ever more fuel efficient and compact Automobile Engines with reduced environmental impact. From the viewpoint of the tribologist this means increasing specific loads, speeds and temperatures for the major frictional components of the Engine, namely, the piston assembly, the valve train and the journal bearings, and lower viscosity Engine oils with which to lubricate them. Inevitably, this leads to decreasing oil film thicknesses between the interacting surfaces of these components and a more crucial role for the topography and surface profile of the two surfaces in determining tribological performance. This paper reviews the nature of the surfaces encountered in the piston assembly, valve train and journal bearings of the internal combustion Engine and how mathematical models of Engine tribology are endeavouring to cope with the extreme complexities the incorporation of surface topography potentially brings. Key areas for future research and the implications for design are highlighted.

  • Automobile Engine tribology approaching the surface
    AUSTRIB ’98 Tribology at Work: Proceedings of the 5th International Tribology Conference in Australia Brisbane 6-9 December 1998, 1998
    Co-Authors: M Priest, C M Taylor

    Abstract:

    There has been relentless pressure in the second half of the twentieth century to develop ever more fuel efficient and compact Automobile Engines with reduced environmental impact. From the viewpoint of the tribologist this means increasing specific loads, speeds and temperatures for the major frictional components of the Engine, namely the piston assembly, the valve train and the journal bearings, and lower viscosity Engine oils with which to lubricate them. Inevitably, this leads to decreasing oil film thicknesses between the interacting surfaces of these components and a more crucial role for the topography and surface profile of the two surfaces in determining tribological performance. This paper will review the nature of the surfaces encountered in the piston assembly, valve train and journal bearings of the internal combustion Engine and how mathematical models of Engine tribology are endeavouring to cope with the extreme complexities the incorporation of surface topography potentially brings. Key areas for future research and the implications for design will be highlighted.

Adrian Birtas – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • ignition of an Automobile Engine by high peak power nd yag cr yag laser spark devices
    Optics Express, 2015
    Co-Authors: N Pavel, T Dascalu, Gabriela Salamu, Mihai P Dinca, Niculae Boicea, Adrian Birtas

    Abstract:

    Laser sparks that were built with high-peak power passively Q-switched Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG lasers have been used to operate a Renault Automobile Engine. The design of such a laser spark igniter is discussed. The Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG laser delivered pulses with energy of 4 mJ and 0.8-ns duration, corresponding to pulse peak power of 5 MW. The coefficients of variability of maximum pressure (COVPmax) and of indicated mean effective pressure (COVIMEP) and specific emissions like hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and carbon dioxide (CO2) were measured at various Engine speeds and high loads. Improved Engine stability in terms of COVPmax and COVPmax and decreased emissions of CO and HC were obtained for the Engine that was run by laser sparks in comparison with classical ignition by electrical spark plugs.