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Automotive Steel

The Experts below are selected from a list of 288 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Kyung Hee Jung – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • New paradigm of Steel mills in the supply chain of Automotive sheets
    Supply Chain Management, 2006
    Co-Authors: Kyung Hee Jung

    Abstract:

    Purpose – To provide new roles of Steel mills with desirable business strategies in the supply chain of Automotive Steel sheets.Design/methodology/approach – The characteristics of the relationship between automakers and Steel mills, which aim to provide different patterns according to regional markets, are classified into the customer‐supplier relations in the regions of North America and Japan. Extended roles of Steel mills with expected responsibilities are considered in the Automotive supply chain, not just raw material suppliers.Findings – Provides new procurement programs of automakers, indicating what can be found there for new paradigm of Steel suppliers and how new procurement programs can change. Emphasizes the necessity of developing more updated and functional business models of Steel mills in the value chain.Practical implications – Steel mills have to extend their conventional roles to downstream processing in the Automotive Steel supply chain, in order to maintain cooperative and interdepen…

  • Task shift of automakers to Steel suppliers in the value chain of Automotive sheets
    International Journal of Automotive Technology and Management, 2005
    Co-Authors: Kyung Hee Jung

    Abstract:

    This study considers the shift of tasks in customer-supplier relations of automakers and Steel mills in the Automotive Steel sheets market. We analyse competitive environments of Automotive Steel makers, and supplier relationships of automakers with Steel mills in North America, Japan and Western Europe, based on regional market characteristics. The essential role of Steel mills in new vehicle development is then defined with the importance of early vendor involvement. It is shown that the conventional roles of automakers in stamping and painting processes are being transferred to Steel mills with more interdependent and collaborative relations. Finally, the organisational structure of global leading mills is investigated, in order to perform effective intra- and inter-firm relations of Steel mills with major automakers.

  • New trends in the supplier-customer relationship between Steel mills and automakers
    SEAISI Quarterly (South East Asia Iron and Steel Institute), 2005
    Co-Authors: Kyung Hee Jung, Sang Kyu Lee

    Abstract:

    This study considers new trends in customer-supplier relations of automakers and Steel mills in the Automotive Steel sheets market. We analyze competitive environments of Automotive Steel makers based on Porter’s competition model, and supplier relationships of automakers with Steel mills in North America, Japan, and Western Europe based on regional market characteristics. Then, the essential role of Steel mills in new vehicle development is defined with the importance of early vendor involvement. As new trends on the supply chain management of automakers, automaker’ role transfers to Steel mills in stamping and painting processes are shown with new trends in buyer-supplier relations. Finally, the organizational structure of global leading mills is investigated, which are geared to perform effective intra- and inter-firm relations with major automakers via internal and external coordination.

John Bicheno – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Supply chain simulation – A tool for education, enhancement and endeavour
    International Journal of Production Economics, 2002
    Co-Authors: Matthias Holweg, John Bicheno

    Abstract:

    This paper describes how a participative simulation model is used to demonstrate supply chain dynamics and to model possible improvements to an entire supply chain. A three-year research project in the Automotive Steel supply chain found that lack of understanding of the core processes throughout the supply chain caused distortion and amplification of both demand and supply patterns. In consequence, this deficit of information is often replaced with inventory – resulting in increased lead times and pipeline cost. At the start of the project there was relatively little collaboration in the supply network. The ‘Lean Leap Logistics Game’ was developed primarily to foster collaboration. To achieve this, the game had to model reality, and was built on a series of mapping activities. Unexpectedly, it turned out that developing and running the game led to insights into scheduler behaviour, scheduling decision making, prioritising improvement activities and into supply chain dynamics, especially the ‘Forrester’ or ‘Bullwhip’ effect. By presenting the experiences of using supply chain simulations, this paper aims at encouraging both academics and practitioners to use this tool to demonstrate and discuss supply chain improvements by simulating their individual characteristics in order to deploy holistic improvements, rather than partial or ‘island’ solutions. © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

Matthias Holweg – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Supply chain simulation – A tool for education, enhancement and endeavour
    International Journal of Production Economics, 2002
    Co-Authors: Matthias Holweg, John Bicheno

    Abstract:

    This paper describes how a participative simulation model is used to demonstrate supply chain dynamics and to model possible improvements to an entire supply chain. A three-year research project in the Automotive Steel supply chain found that lack of understanding of the core processes throughout the supply chain caused distortion and amplification of both demand and supply patterns. In consequence, this deficit of information is often replaced with inventory – resulting in increased lead times and pipeline cost. At the start of the project there was relatively little collaboration in the supply network. The ‘Lean Leap Logistics Game’ was developed primarily to foster collaboration. To achieve this, the game had to model reality, and was built on a series of mapping activities. Unexpectedly, it turned out that developing and running the game led to insights into scheduler behaviour, scheduling decision making, prioritising improvement activities and into supply chain dynamics, especially the ‘Forrester’ or ‘Bullwhip’ effect. By presenting the experiences of using supply chain simulations, this paper aims at encouraging both academics and practitioners to use this tool to demonstrate and discuss supply chain improvements by simulating their individual characteristics in order to deploy holistic improvements, rather than partial or ‘island’ solutions. © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.