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The Experts below are selected from a list of 291 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Joy Noel Baumgartner – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Beneath the Surface: A Comparison of Methods for Assessment of Quality of Care for Maternal and Neonatal Health Care in Rural Uganda
    Maternal and Child Health Journal, 2020
    Co-Authors: Joseph R. Egger, Jennifer Headley, Yixuan Li, Julius Kirya, Luke Aldridge, Stefanie Weiland, Joy Noel Baumgartner

    Abstract:

    Objectives Efforts to improve access to healthcare in low-income countries will not achieve the maternal and child health (MCH) Sustainable Development Goals unless a concomitant improvement in the quality of care (QoC) occurs. This study measures infrastructure and QoC indicators in rural Ugandan health facilities. Valid measure of the quality of current clinical practices in resource-limited settings are critical for effectively intervening to reduce adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. Methods Facility-based assessments of infrastructure and clinical quality during labor and delivery were conducted in six primary care health facilities in the greater Masaka area, Uganda in 2017. Data were collected using direct observation of clinical encounters and facility checklists. Direct observation comprised the entire delivery process, from initial client assessment to discharge, and included emergency management (e.g. postpartum hemorrhage, neonatal resuscitation). Health providers were assessed on their adherence to best practice standards of care. Results The quality of facility infrastructure was relatively high in facilities, with little variation in Availability of Equipment and supplies. However, heterogeneity in adherence to best clinical practices was noted across procedure type and facility. Adherence to crude measures of clinical quality were relatively high but more sensitive measures of the same clinical practice were found to be much lower. Conclusions for Practice Standard indicators of clinical practice may be insufficient to validly measure clinical quality for maternal and newborn care if we want to document evidence of impact.

  • beneath the surface a comparison of methods for assessment of quality of care for maternal and neonatal health care in rural uganda
    Maternal and Child Health Journal, 2020
    Co-Authors: Joseph R. Egger, Jennifer Headley, Yixuan Li, Julius Kirya, Stefanie Weiland, Luke R Aldridge, Joy Noel Baumgartner

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVES: Efforts to improve access to healthcare in low-income countries will not achieve the maternal and child health (MCH) Sustainable Development Goals unless a concomitant improvement in the quality of care (QoC) occurs. This study measures infrastructure and QoC indicators in rural Ugandan health facilities. Valid measure of the quality of current clinical practices in resource-limited settings are critical for effectively intervening to reduce adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. METHODS: Facility-based assessments of infrastructure and clinical quality during labor and delivery were conducted in six primary care health facilities in the greater Masaka area, Uganda in 2017. Data were collected using direct observation of clinical encounters and facility checklists. Direct observation comprised the entire delivery process, from initial client assessment to discharge, and included emergency management (e.g. postpartum hemorrhage, neonatal resuscitation). Health providers were assessed on their adherence to best practice standards of care. RESULTS: The quality of facility infrastructure was relatively high in facilities, with little variation in Availability of Equipment and supplies. However, heterogeneity in adherence to best clinical practices was noted across procedure type and facility. Adherence to crude measures of clinical quality were relatively high but more sensitive measures of the same clinical practice were found to be much lower. CONCLUSIONS FOR PRACTICE: Standard indicators of clinical practice may be insufficient to validly measure clinical quality for maternal and newborn care if we want to document evidence of impact.

Kari S. Hansen – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Trauma Care in Africa: A Status Report From Botswana, Guided by the World Health Organization’s “Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care”
    World Journal of Surgery, 2012
    Co-Authors: Terje Peder Hanche-olsen, Lulseged Alemu, Asgaut Viste, Torben Wisborg, Kari S. Hansen

    Abstract:

    Background Trauma represents a significant and increasing challenge to health care systems all over the world. This study aimed to evaluate the trauma care capabilities of Botswana, a middle-income African country, by applying the World Health Organization’s Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care. Methods All 27 government (16 primary, 9 district, 2 referral) hospitals were surveyed. A questionnaire and checklist, based on “Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care” and locally adapted, were developed as situation analysis tools. The questionnaire assessed local trauma organization, capacity, and the presence of quality improvement activity. The checklist assessed physical Availability of Equipment and timely Availability of trauma-related skills. Information was collected by interviews with hospital administrators, key personnel within trauma care, and through on-site physical inspection. Results Hospitals in Botswana are reasonably well supplied with human and physical resources for trauma care, although deficiencies were noted. At the primary and district levels, both capacity and Equipment for airway/breathing management and vascular access was limited. Trauma administrative functions were largely absent at all levels. No hospital in Botswana had any plans for trauma education, separate from or incorporated into other improvement activities. Team organization was nonexistent, and training activities in the emergency room were limited. Conclusions This study draws a picture of trauma care capabilities of an entire African country. Despite good organizational structures, Botswana has room for substantial improvement. Administrative functions, training, and human and physical resources could be improved. By applying the guidelines, this study creates an objective foundation for improved trauma care in Botswana.

Joseph R. Egger – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Beneath the Surface: A Comparison of Methods for Assessment of Quality of Care for Maternal and Neonatal Health Care in Rural Uganda
    Maternal and Child Health Journal, 2020
    Co-Authors: Joseph R. Egger, Jennifer Headley, Yixuan Li, Julius Kirya, Luke Aldridge, Stefanie Weiland, Joy Noel Baumgartner

    Abstract:

    Objectives Efforts to improve access to healthcare in low-income countries will not achieve the maternal and child health (MCH) Sustainable Development Goals unless a concomitant improvement in the quality of care (QoC) occurs. This study measures infrastructure and QoC indicators in rural Ugandan health facilities. Valid measure of the quality of current clinical practices in resource-limited settings are critical for effectively intervening to reduce adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. Methods Facility-based assessments of infrastructure and clinical quality during labor and delivery were conducted in six primary care health facilities in the greater Masaka area, Uganda in 2017. Data were collected using direct observation of clinical encounters and facility checklists. Direct observation comprised the entire delivery process, from initial client assessment to discharge, and included emergency management (e.g. postpartum hemorrhage, neonatal resuscitation). Health providers were assessed on their adherence to best practice standards of care. Results The quality of facility infrastructure was relatively high in facilities, with little variation in Availability of Equipment and supplies. However, heterogeneity in adherence to best clinical practices was noted across procedure type and facility. Adherence to crude measures of clinical quality were relatively high but more sensitive measures of the same clinical practice were found to be much lower. Conclusions for Practice Standard indicators of clinical practice may be insufficient to validly measure clinical quality for maternal and newborn care if we want to document evidence of impact.

  • beneath the surface a comparison of methods for assessment of quality of care for maternal and neonatal health care in rural uganda
    Maternal and Child Health Journal, 2020
    Co-Authors: Joseph R. Egger, Jennifer Headley, Yixuan Li, Julius Kirya, Stefanie Weiland, Luke R Aldridge, Joy Noel Baumgartner

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVES: Efforts to improve access to healthcare in low-income countries will not achieve the maternal and child health (MCH) Sustainable Development Goals unless a concomitant improvement in the quality of care (QoC) occurs. This study measures infrastructure and QoC indicators in rural Ugandan health facilities. Valid measure of the quality of current clinical practices in resource-limited settings are critical for effectively intervening to reduce adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. METHODS: Facility-based assessments of infrastructure and clinical quality during labor and delivery were conducted in six primary care health facilities in the greater Masaka area, Uganda in 2017. Data were collected using direct observation of clinical encounters and facility checklists. Direct observation comprised the entire delivery process, from initial client assessment to discharge, and included emergency management (e.g. postpartum hemorrhage, neonatal resuscitation). Health providers were assessed on their adherence to best practice standards of care. RESULTS: The quality of facility infrastructure was relatively high in facilities, with little variation in Availability of Equipment and supplies. However, heterogeneity in adherence to best clinical practices was noted across procedure type and facility. Adherence to crude measures of clinical quality were relatively high but more sensitive measures of the same clinical practice were found to be much lower. CONCLUSIONS FOR PRACTICE: Standard indicators of clinical practice may be insufficient to validly measure clinical quality for maternal and newborn care if we want to document evidence of impact.