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Aviaries

The Experts below are selected from a list of 300 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

P J B Slater – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • song tutor choice by zebra finches in Aviaries
    Animal Behaviour, 1995
    Co-Authors: Nigel I Mann, P J B Slater

    Abstract:

    Abstract The social interactions and song learning of young male zebra finches, Taeniopygia guttata , were studied in two Aviaries, each containing four breeding pairs and several other adult males. Half of the adults were of the fawn morph and half of the chestnut-flanked white. Seventeen young males were reared, and each tended to learn most of its song from one adult. They showed a strong tendency to learn song elements from males of the same morph as their father and, within that morph, the father tended to be the preferred tutor. Most learnt from the male with which they maintained greatest proximity. No relationship was found between song learning and the song length or singing rate of individual adults, or with various aspects of social behaviour, such as allopreening or aggression. No young bird was seen to be fed by an adult other than one of its parents; most of the young continued to associate more with their siblings than with other juveniles after independence, and there was some evidence that siblings that associated most closely developed most similar song characteristics. Differences in social relationships and in song learning from some earlier studies may stem from the greater space available in the Aviaries used here.

Manfred Gahr – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • behavioural and physiological effects of population density on domesticated zebra finches taeniopygia guttata held in Aviaries
    Physiology & Behavior, 2012
    Co-Authors: Hanneke Poot, Andries Ter Maat, Lisa Trost, Ingrid Schwabl, R F Jansen, Manfred Gahr

    Abstract:

    Abstract Zebra Finches ( Taeniopygia guttata ) are highly social and monogamous birds that display relatively low levels of aggression and coordinate group life mainly by means of vocal communication. In the wild, small groups may congregate to larger flocks of up to 150–350 birds. Little is known, however, about possible effects of population density on development in captivity. Investigating density effects on physiology and behaviour might be helpful in identifying optimal group size, in order to optimise Zebra Finch wellbeing. A direct effect of population density on development and reproduction was found: birds in lower density conditions produced significantly more and larger (body mass, tarsus length) surviving offspring than birds in high density conditions. Furthermore, offspring in low density Aviaries produced slightly longer song motifs and more different syllables than their tutors, whereas offspring in high density Aviaries produced shorter motifs and a smaller or similar number of different syllables than their tutors. Aggression levels within the populations were low throughout the experiment, but the number of aggressive interactions was significantly higher in high density Aviaries. Baseline corticosterone levels did not differ significantly between high- and low density Aviaries for either adult or offspring birds. On day 15 post hatching, brood size and baseline corticosterone levels were positively correlated. On days 60 and 100 post hatching this correlation was no longer present. The results of this study prove that population density affects various aspects of Zebra Finch development, with birds living in low population density conditions having an advantage over those living under higher population density conditions.

Nigel I Mann – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • song tutor choice by zebra finches in Aviaries
    Animal Behaviour, 1995
    Co-Authors: Nigel I Mann, P J B Slater

    Abstract:

    Abstract The social interactions and song learning of young male zebra finches, Taeniopygia guttata , were studied in two Aviaries, each containing four breeding pairs and several other adult males. Half of the adults were of the fawn morph and half of the chestnut-flanked white. Seventeen young males were reared, and each tended to learn most of its song from one adult. They showed a strong tendency to learn song elements from males of the same morph as their father and, within that morph, the father tended to be the preferred tutor. Most learnt from the male with which they maintained greatest proximity. No relationship was found between song learning and the song length or singing rate of individual adults, or with various aspects of social behaviour, such as allopreening or aggression. No young bird was seen to be fed by an adult other than one of its parents; most of the young continued to associate more with their siblings than with other juveniles after independence, and there was some evidence that siblings that associated most closely developed most similar song characteristics. Differences in social relationships and in song learning from some earlier studies may stem from the greater space available in the Aviaries used here.