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Ron Boschma – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • knowledge networks in the dutch Aviation Industry the proximity paradox
    Journal of Economic Geography, 2012
    Co-Authors: Tom Broekel, Ron Boschma

    Abstract:

    The importance of geographical proximity for interaction and knowledge sharing has been discussed extensively in economic geography in recent years. There is increasing consensus that it is just one out of many types of proximities that might be relevant. We argue that proximity may be a crucial driver for agents to connect and exchange knowledge, but too much proximity between these agents on any of the dimensions might harm their innovative performance at the same time. In a study on knowledge networks in the Dutch Aviation Industry, we test this so-called proximity paradox empirically. We find evidence that the proximity paradox holds to some degree. Our study clearly shows that cognitive, social and geographical proximity are crucial for explaining the knowledge network of the Dutch Aviation Industry. But while it takes cognitive, social and geographical proximity to exchange knowledge, we found evidence that proximity lowers firms’s innovative performance, but only in the cognitive dimension.

  • Knowledge networks in the Dutch Aviation Industry: The proximity paradox
    Journal of Economic Geography, 2012
    Co-Authors: Tom Broekel, Ron Boschma

    Abstract:

    The importance of geographical proximity for interaction and knowledge sharing has been discussed extensively in recent years. There is increasing consensus that geographical proximity is just one out of many types of proximities that might be relevant. We argue that proximity may be a crucial driver for agents to connect and exchange knowledge, but too much proximity between agents on any of the dimensions might harm their innovative performance at the same time. In a study on knowledge networks in the Dutch Aviation Industry, we test this so-called proximity paradox empirically. We found evidence that the proximity paradox holds to a considerable degree. Our study clearly showed that cognitive, social, organizational and geographical proximity were crucial for explaining the knowledge network of the Dutch Aviation Industry. However, we found strong evidence that too much cognitive proximity lowered firms’ innovative performance, and organizational proximity did not have an effect.

Tom Broekel – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • knowledge networks in the dutch Aviation Industry the proximity paradox
    Journal of Economic Geography, 2012
    Co-Authors: Tom Broekel, Ron Boschma

    Abstract:

    The importance of geographical proximity for interaction and knowledge sharing has been discussed extensively in economic geography in recent years. There is increasing consensus that it is just one out of many types of proximities that might be relevant. We argue that proximity may be a crucial driver for agents to connect and exchange knowledge, but too much proximity between these agents on any of the dimensions might harm their innovative performance at the same time. In a study on knowledge networks in the Dutch Aviation Industry, we test this so-called proximity paradox empirically. We find evidence that the proximity paradox holds to some degree. Our study clearly shows that cognitive, social and geographical proximity are crucial for explaining the knowledge network of the Dutch Aviation Industry. But while it takes cognitive, social and geographical proximity to exchange knowledge, we found evidence that proximity lowers firms’s innovative performance, but only in the cognitive dimension.

  • Knowledge networks in the Dutch Aviation Industry: The proximity paradox
    Journal of Economic Geography, 2012
    Co-Authors: Tom Broekel, Ron Boschma

    Abstract:

    The importance of geographical proximity for interaction and knowledge sharing has been discussed extensively in recent years. There is increasing consensus that geographical proximity is just one out of many types of proximities that might be relevant. We argue that proximity may be a crucial driver for agents to connect and exchange knowledge, but too much proximity between agents on any of the dimensions might harm their innovative performance at the same time. In a study on knowledge networks in the Dutch Aviation Industry, we test this so-called proximity paradox empirically. We found evidence that the proximity paradox holds to a considerable degree. Our study clearly showed that cognitive, social, organizational and geographical proximity were crucial for explaining the knowledge network of the Dutch Aviation Industry. However, we found strong evidence that too much cognitive proximity lowered firms’ innovative performance, and organizational proximity did not have an effect.

Thomas Clauss – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • business model innovation in the Aviation Industry
    International Journal of Product Development, 2013
    Co-Authors: S. Schneider, Patrick Spieth, Thomas Clauss

    Abstract:

    In response to changing sources of value creation, business model innovation has recently emerged as a concept that allows dealing with volatile environments. Focusing on the Aviation Industry, we aim at enhancing the understanding of drivers, elements and forms of business model innovation. We use an inductive, theory-building design that allows patterns of business model innovation to come to light across multiple case studies of Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul (MRO) companies in the Aviation Industry. In line with prior theory, we find that a range of supply and demand-driven effects trigger the need for business model innovation in the Aviation sector. We identify aircraft manufacturer market characteristics and structural airline Industry characteristics as drivers of MRO business model innovation. New MRO value offerings and MRO value creation were set as constituting elements of innovating MRO business models resulting in customer benefit-oriented and value co-creation-oriented business model innovation.

  • Business model innovation in the Aviation Industry
    International Journal of Product Development, 2013
    Co-Authors: S. Schneider, Patrick Spieth, Thomas Clauss, Schneider S., Spieth P., Clauss T.

    Abstract:

    In response to changing sources of value creation, business model innovation has recently emerged as a concept that allows dealing with volatile environments. Focusing on the Aviation Industry, we aim at enhancing the understanding of drivers, elements and forms of business model innovation. We use an inductive, theory-building design that allows patterns of business model innovation to come to light across multiple case studies of Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul (MRO) companies in the Aviation Industry. In line with prior theory, we find that a range of supply and demand-driven effects trigger the need for business model innovation in the Aviation sector. We identify aircraft manufacturer market characteristics and structural airline Industry characteristics as drivers of MRO business model innovation. New MRO value offerings and MRO value creation were set as constituting elements of innovating MRO business models resulting in customer benefit-oriented and value co-creation-oriented business model innovation. © 2013 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.