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Axillary Artery

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Mariano E Menendez – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Axillary Artery injury associated with proximal humerus fracture a report of 6 cases
    The archives of bone and joint surgery, 2017
    Co-Authors: Rinne M Peters, Mariano E Menendez, Jos J Mellema, David Ring, Malcolm R Smith

    Abstract:

    Â Proximal humerus fractures are common, but associated injury of the Axillary Artery is uncommon. The majority of published blunt traumatic Axillary Artery injuries are associated with anterior glenohumeral dislocation; a few are associated with isolated proximal humerus fractures or fracture-dislocation. Experience within our institution demonstrates that Axillary Artery injury is often unrecognized on initial presentation owing to palpable peripheral pulses and the absence of ischemia and places the hand at risk of necrosis and amputation if there is prolonged ischemia and the forearm at risk of compartment syndrome after revascularization. Accurate physical examination in combination with a low threshold for Doppler examination or angiography can establish the diagnosis of Axillary Artery injury. We present 6 cases of Axillary Artery injury associated with proximal humerus fractures in order to highlight the potential for this vascular injury in the setting of a proximal humerus fracture.

  • proximal humerus fracture with injury to the Axillary Artery a population based study
    Injury-international Journal of The Care of The Injured, 2015
    Co-Authors: Mariano E Menendez, David Ring, Marilyn Heng

    Abstract:

    Abstract Background The available evidence regarding Axillary Artery injury as a result of proximal humerus fracture consists of individual case reports or small series. This study used nationally representative data to determine the prevalence and predictors of Axillary Artery injury secondary to proximal humerus fracture, and to characterise its influence on inpatient mortality, length of stay, cost and discharge disposition. Methods An estimated 388,676 inpatients with a proximal humerus fracture were identified in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample between 2002 and 2011, 331 with concomitant Axillary Artery injury (8.5 per 10,000). Multivariable regression modelling was used to identify independent predictors of Axillary Artery injury and to assess its relationship with inpatient outcomes. Results Factors associated with Axillary Artery injury were male sex (odds ratio (OR): 1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2–2.0), atherosclerosis (OR: 3.7, 95% CI: 2.5–5.4), open fracture (OR: 2.9, 95% CI: 1.9–4.5) and the presence of concomitant injuries, including brachial plexus injury (OR: 109, 95% CI: 79–151), shoulder dislocation (OR: 3.4, 95% CI: 2.0–5.8), scapula fracture (OR: 3.4, 95% CI: 2.1–5.4) and rib fracture (OR: 2.5, 95% CI: 1.6–4.0). Axillary Artery injury was associated with increased length of stay, costs and mortality, but it did not affect discharge disposition. Conclusion Our study provides important baseline information regarding the epidemiology of Axillary Artery injury secondary to proximal humerus fracture. Prompt identification of at-risk patients upon admission might lead to improved diagnosis and management of this vascular injury. Level of Evidence Prognostic level II.

Marilyn Heng – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • proximal humerus fracture with injury to the Axillary Artery a population based study
    Injury-international Journal of The Care of The Injured, 2015
    Co-Authors: Mariano E Menendez, David Ring, Marilyn Heng

    Abstract:

    Abstract Background The available evidence regarding Axillary Artery injury as a result of proximal humerus fracture consists of individual case reports or small series. This study used nationally representative data to determine the prevalence and predictors of Axillary Artery injury secondary to proximal humerus fracture, and to characterise its influence on inpatient mortality, length of stay, cost and discharge disposition. Methods An estimated 388,676 inpatients with a proximal humerus fracture were identified in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample between 2002 and 2011, 331 with concomitant Axillary Artery injury (8.5 per 10,000). Multivariable regression modelling was used to identify independent predictors of Axillary Artery injury and to assess its relationship with inpatient outcomes. Results Factors associated with Axillary Artery injury were male sex (odds ratio (OR): 1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2–2.0), atherosclerosis (OR: 3.7, 95% CI: 2.5–5.4), open fracture (OR: 2.9, 95% CI: 1.9–4.5) and the presence of concomitant injuries, including brachial plexus injury (OR: 109, 95% CI: 79–151), shoulder dislocation (OR: 3.4, 95% CI: 2.0–5.8), scapula fracture (OR: 3.4, 95% CI: 2.1–5.4) and rib fracture (OR: 2.5, 95% CI: 1.6–4.0). Axillary Artery injury was associated with increased length of stay, costs and mortality, but it did not affect discharge disposition. Conclusion Our study provides important baseline information regarding the epidemiology of Axillary Artery injury secondary to proximal humerus fracture. Prompt identification of at-risk patients upon admission might lead to improved diagnosis and management of this vascular injury. Level of Evidence Prognostic level II.

David Ring – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Axillary Artery injury associated with proximal humerus fracture a report of 6 cases
    The archives of bone and joint surgery, 2017
    Co-Authors: Rinne M Peters, Mariano E Menendez, Jos J Mellema, David Ring, Malcolm R Smith

    Abstract:

    Â Proximal humerus fractures are common, but associated injury of the Axillary Artery is uncommon. The majority of published blunt traumatic Axillary Artery injuries are associated with anterior glenohumeral dislocation; a few are associated with isolated proximal humerus fractures or fracture-dislocation. Experience within our institution demonstrates that Axillary Artery injury is often unrecognized on initial presentation owing to palpable peripheral pulses and the absence of ischemia and places the hand at risk of necrosis and amputation if there is prolonged ischemia and the forearm at risk of compartment syndrome after revascularization. Accurate physical examination in combination with a low threshold for Doppler examination or angiography can establish the diagnosis of Axillary Artery injury. We present 6 cases of Axillary Artery injury associated with proximal humerus fractures in order to highlight the potential for this vascular injury in the setting of a proximal humerus fracture.

  • proximal humerus fracture with injury to the Axillary Artery a population based study
    Injury-international Journal of The Care of The Injured, 2015
    Co-Authors: Mariano E Menendez, David Ring, Marilyn Heng

    Abstract:

    Abstract Background The available evidence regarding Axillary Artery injury as a result of proximal humerus fracture consists of individual case reports or small series. This study used nationally representative data to determine the prevalence and predictors of Axillary Artery injury secondary to proximal humerus fracture, and to characterise its influence on inpatient mortality, length of stay, cost and discharge disposition. Methods An estimated 388,676 inpatients with a proximal humerus fracture were identified in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample between 2002 and 2011, 331 with concomitant Axillary Artery injury (8.5 per 10,000). Multivariable regression modelling was used to identify independent predictors of Axillary Artery injury and to assess its relationship with inpatient outcomes. Results Factors associated with Axillary Artery injury were male sex (odds ratio (OR): 1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2–2.0), atherosclerosis (OR: 3.7, 95% CI: 2.5–5.4), open fracture (OR: 2.9, 95% CI: 1.9–4.5) and the presence of concomitant injuries, including brachial plexus injury (OR: 109, 95% CI: 79–151), shoulder dislocation (OR: 3.4, 95% CI: 2.0–5.8), scapula fracture (OR: 3.4, 95% CI: 2.1–5.4) and rib fracture (OR: 2.5, 95% CI: 1.6–4.0). Axillary Artery injury was associated with increased length of stay, costs and mortality, but it did not affect discharge disposition. Conclusion Our study provides important baseline information regarding the epidemiology of Axillary Artery injury secondary to proximal humerus fracture. Prompt identification of at-risk patients upon admission might lead to improved diagnosis and management of this vascular injury. Level of Evidence Prognostic level II.