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Bacterium Adherence

The Experts below are selected from a list of 18 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Hazel M. Mitchell – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Pathogenic Potential of Campylobacter ureolyticus
    Infection and Immunity, 2011
    Co-Authors: Jose A. Burgos-portugal, Nadeem O. Kaakoush, Mark J. Raftery, Hazel M. Mitchell

    Abstract:

    The recent detection and isolation of the aflagellate Campylobacter ureolyticus (previously known as Bacteroides ureolyticus) from intestinal biopsy specimens and fecal samples of children with newly diagnosed Crohn’s disease led us to investigate the pathogenic potential of this Bacterium. Adherence and gentamicin protection assays were employed to quantify the levels of Adherence to and invasion into host cells. C. ureolyticus UNSWCD was able to adhere to the Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell line with a value of 5.341% ± 0.74% but was not able to invade the Caco-2 cells. The addition of two proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ), to the cell line did not affect attachment or invasion, with attachment levels being 4.156% ± 0.61% (P = 0.270) for TNF-α and 6.472% ± 0.61% (P = 0.235) for IFN-γ. Scanning electron microscopy visually confirmed attachment and revealed that C. ureolyticus UNSWCD colonizes and adheres to intestinal cells, inducing cellular damage and microvillus degradation. Purification and identification of the C. ureolyticus UNSWCD secretome detected a total of 111 proteins, from which 29 were bioinformatically predicted to be secretory proteins. Functional classification revealed three putative virulence and colonization factors: the surface antigen CjaA, an outer membrane fibronectin binding protein, and an S-layer RTX toxin. These results suggest that C. ureolyticus has the potential to be a pathogen of the gastrointestinal tract.

Christiane Forestier – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Aggregative Adherence of Klebsiella pneumoniae to human intestine-407 cells.
    Infection and Immunity, 1995
    Co-Authors: S Favre-bonte, A Darfeuille-michaud, Christiane Forestier

    Abstract:

    Aggregative adhesion of Klebsiella pneumoniae LM3 to Intestine-407 (Int-407) cells was studied. Adhesive capacities were affected by the bacterial growth phase (with a maximum of Adherence obtained during the exponential phase), temperature, multiplicity of infection, and length of incubation with Int-407 cells. Adhesion occurred through a cytochalasin D-sensitive process and was greatly reduced after treatment of Int-407 with cycloheximide, indicating that aggregative adhesion requires active participation of Int-407 cells. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that adherent bacteria were surrounded by a capsule-like material, apparently involved in both Bacterium-Int-407 cell and BacteriumBacterium Adherence. Examination with a scanning electron microscope showed interactions of intestinal cell microvilli with bacteria and formation in 3 h of a fibrous network within and around the bacterial clusters. We speculate that aggregative adhesion of K. pneumoniae mediated by a capsule-like extracellular material might explain the persistence of these strains inside the host gastrointestinal tract.

Jose A. Burgos-portugal – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Pathogenic Potential of Campylobacter ureolyticus
    Infection and Immunity, 2011
    Co-Authors: Jose A. Burgos-portugal, Nadeem O. Kaakoush, Mark J. Raftery, Hazel M. Mitchell

    Abstract:

    The recent detection and isolation of the aflagellate Campylobacter ureolyticus (previously known as Bacteroides ureolyticus) from intestinal biopsy specimens and fecal samples of children with newly diagnosed Crohn’s disease led us to investigate the pathogenic potential of this Bacterium. Adherence and gentamicin protection assays were employed to quantify the levels of Adherence to and invasion into host cells. C. ureolyticus UNSWCD was able to adhere to the Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell line with a value of 5.341% ± 0.74% but was not able to invade the Caco-2 cells. The addition of two proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ), to the cell line did not affect attachment or invasion, with attachment levels being 4.156% ± 0.61% (P = 0.270) for TNF-α and 6.472% ± 0.61% (P = 0.235) for IFN-γ. Scanning electron microscopy visually confirmed attachment and revealed that C. ureolyticus UNSWCD colonizes and adheres to intestinal cells, inducing cellular damage and microvillus degradation. Purification and identification of the C. ureolyticus UNSWCD secretome detected a total of 111 proteins, from which 29 were bioinformatically predicted to be secretory proteins. Functional classification revealed three putative virulence and colonization factors: the surface antigen CjaA, an outer membrane fibronectin binding protein, and an S-layer RTX toxin. These results suggest that C. ureolyticus has the potential to be a pathogen of the gastrointestinal tract.