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Balint Syndrome

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James A Sharpe – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • posterior reversible encephalopathy Syndrome presenting as Balint Syndrome
    Journal of Neuro-ophthalmology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Sunil Kumar, Archana Abhayambika, Arun N E Sundaram, James A Sharpe

    Abstract:

    Abstract: Balint Syndrome is a disorder of inaccurate visually guided saccades, optic ataxia, and simultanagnosia that typically results from bilateral parieto-occipital lesions. Visual perception disturbances in the posterior reversible encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) include hemianopia, visual neglect, and cerebral blindness, but Balint Syndrome had not been recognized. We report Balint Syndrome associated with PRES in a 37-year-old woman with acute hypertension and systemic lupus erythematosus. Balint Syndrome can be an initial presentation of PRES.

F Boiler – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • visuo spatial dysgnosia and Balint s Syndrome as major symptoms of probable alzheimer s disease
    European Journal of Neurology, 1996
    Co-Authors: P Davous, M Panisset, M Agostini, F Boiler

    Abstract:

    We describe three patients, respectively 57-, 54- and 55-years-old at onset of the disease, who developed over many years a progressive cortical visual dysfunction without overt dementia. At onset, the visual symptoms were mainly a visuo-spatial dysgnosia, but they progressively worsened to a near complete Balint Syndrome in the three cases. In all of them, memory and language were only mildly affected during the first years of evolution, but a constructive and/or dressing apraxia and an optic ataxia in the left visual hemifield suggested in two cases a predominant dysfunction in the right hemisphere. Imaging of the brain by CT scan and MRI showed no focal atrophy, but the metabolic SPECT was early abnormal in all three cases showing a right posterior metabolic defect in two cases and a bilateral posterior hypometabolism in one case. Follow-up of the patients showed that they all developed language and memory disturbances leading to severe dementia after 5–8 years of evolution. It is suggested that these patients are affected by a visual form of Alzheimer’s disease which is probably the most frequent cause of progressive Balint-Holmes Syndrome.

  • Visuo‐spatial dysgnosia and Balint‘s Syndrome as major symptoms of probable Alzheimer’s disease
    European Journal of Neurology, 1996
    Co-Authors: P Davous, M Panisset, M Agostini, F Boiler

    Abstract:

    We describe three patients, respectively 57-, 54- and 55-years-old at onset of the disease, who developed over many years a progressive cortical visual dysfunction without overt dementia. At onset, the visual symptoms were mainly a visuo-spatial dysgnosia, but they progressively worsened to a near complete Balint Syndrome in the three cases. In all of them, memory and language were only mildly affected during the first years of evolution, but a constructive and/or dressing apraxia and an optic ataxia in the left visual hemifield suggested in two cases a predominant dysfunction in the right hemisphere. Imaging of the brain by CT scan and MRI showed no focal atrophy, but the metabolic SPECT was early abnormal in all three cases showing a right posterior metabolic defect in two cases and a bilateral posterior hypometabolism in one case. Follow-up of the patients showed that they all developed language and memory disturbances leading to severe dementia after 5–8 years of evolution. It is suggested that these patients are affected by a visual form of Alzheimer’s disease which is probably the most frequent cause of progressive Balint-Holmes Syndrome.

S L Galetta – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Balint Syndrome due to creutzfeldt jakob disease
    Neurology, 2004
    Co-Authors: Beau M Ances, Jeffrey M Ellenbogen, Susan T Herman, Dina A Jacobs, David S Liebeskind, Anjan Chatterjee, S L Galetta

    Abstract:

    Since Balint originally described a patient with striking disturbances in vision and movement,1 this Syndrome has been reported to result from stroke, metastatic lesions, demyelinating disorders, carbon monoxide poisoning, corticobasal ganglionic degeneration, Alzheimer disease, and HIV infection.2 We report a patient with Balint Syndrome resulting from Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD).

    A 65-year-old man with no medical history developed personality changes during a 3-week period. He experienced visual hallucinations and paranoid delusion of neighbors stealing his money and Internet identity. Initial brain MRI revealed T2 hyperintensities within the parietal and occipital lobes. Progressive neuropsychiatric decline required hospitalization. On admission he had disorganized perseverative behavior, fixation on guilt, mild apraxia, and a Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) of 26 of 30 with errors in orientation and recall. MRI at admission showed T2 hyperintensities within the parietal and occipital lobes, whereas diffusion-weighted …