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Base Resin

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Debora Barros Barbosa – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Silver Distribution and Release from an Antimicrobial Denture Base Resin Containing Silver Colloidal Nanoparticles
    Journal of Prosthodontics, 2012
    Co-Authors: Douglas Roberto Monteiro, Luiz Fernando Gorup, Aline Satie Takamiya, Emerson R. Camargo, Adhemar Colla Ruvolo Filho, Debora Barros Barbosa

    Abstract:

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate a denture Base Resin containing silver colloidal nanoparticles through morphological analysis to check the distribution and dispersion of these particles in the polymer and by testing the silver release in deionized water at different time periods.\n\nMATERIALS AND METHODS: A Lucitone 550 denture Resin was used, and silver nanoparticles were synthesized by reduction of silver nitrate with sodium citrate. The acrylic Resin was prepared in accordance with the manufacturers’ instructions, and silver nanoparticle suspension was added to the acrylic Resin monomer in different concentrations (0.05, 0.5, and 5 vol% silver colloidal). Controls devoid of silver nanoparticles were included. The specimens were stored in deionized water at 37°C for 7, 15, 30, 60, and 120 days, and each solution was analyzed using atomic absorption spectroscopy.\n\nRESULTS: Silver was not detected in deionized water regardless of the silver nanoparticles added to the Resin and of the storage period. Micrographs showed that with lower concentrations, the distribution of silver nanoparticles was reduced, whereas their dispersion was improved in the polymer. Moreover, after 120 days of storage, nanoparticles were mainly located on the surface of the nanocomposite specimens.\n\nCONCLUSIONS: Incorporation of silver nanoparticles in the acrylic Resin was evidenced. Moreover, silver was not detected by the detection limit of the atomic absorption spectrophotometer used in this study, even after 120 days of storage in deionized water. Silver nanoparticles are incorporated in the PMMA denture Resin to attain an effective antimicrobial material to help control common infections involving oral mucosal tissues in complete denture wearers.

  • The effect of polymerization cycles on porosity of microwave-processed denture Base Resin
    Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, 2004
    Co-Authors: Marco Antonio Compagnoni, Debora Barros Barbosa, Raphael Freitas De Souza, Ana Carolina Pero

    Abstract:

    Abstract Statement of problem Although most of the physical properties of denture Base Resin polymerized by microwave energy have been shown to be similar to Resins polymerized by the conventional heat polymerization method, the presence of porosity is a problem. Purpose This study evaluated the effect of different microwave polymerization cycles on the porosity of a denture Base Resin designed for microwave polymerization. Material and methods Thirty-two rectangular Resin specimens (65×40×5 mm) were divided into 3 experimental groups (A, B, and C; Onda-Cryl, microwave-polymerized Resin) and 1 control group (T; Classico, heat-polymerized Resin), according to the following polymerization cycles: (A) 500 W for 3 minutes, (B) 90 W for 13 minutes + 500 W for 90 seconds, (C) 320 W for 3 minutes + 0 W for 4 minutes + 720 W for 3 minutes, and (T) 74°C for 9 hours. Porosity was calculated by measurement of the specimen volume before and after its immersion in water. Data were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance (α = .05). Results The mean values and SDs of the percent mean porosity were: A = 1.05%±0.28%, B = 0.91%±0.15%, C = 0.88%±0.23%, T = 0.93%±0.23%. No significant differences were found in mean porosity among the groups evaluated. Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, a denture Base Resin specifically designed for microwave polymerization tested was not affected by different polymerization cycles. Porosity was similar to the conventional heat-polymerized denture Base Resin tested.

D B Barbosa – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • silver distribution and release from an antimicrobial denture Base Resin containing silver colloidal nanoparticles
    Journal of Prosthodontics, 2012
    Co-Authors: Douglas Roberto Monteiro, Luiz Fernando Gorup, Aline Satie Takamiya, Emerson R. Camargo, Adhemar Ruvolo C Filho, D B Barbosa

    Abstract:

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate a denture Base Resin containing silver colloidal nanoparticles through morphological analysis to check the distribution and dispersion of these particles in the polymer and by testing the silver release in deionized water at different time periods.

    Materials and Methods: A Lucitone 550 denture Resin was used, and silver nanoparticles were synthesized by reduction of silver nitrate with sodium citrate. The acrylic Resin was prepared in accordance with the manufacturers’ instructions, and silver nanoparticle suspension was added to the acrylic Resin monomer in different concentrations (0.05, 0.5, and 5 vol% silver colloidal). Controls devoid of silver nanoparticles were included. The specimens were stored in deionized water at 37°C for 7, 15, 30, 60, and 120 days, and each solution was analyzed using atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Results: Silver was not detected in deionized water regardless of the silver nanoparticles added to the Resin and of the storage period. Micrographs showed that with lower concentrations, the distribution of silver nanoparticles was reduced, whereas their dispersion was improved in the polymer. Moreover, after 120 days of storage, nanoparticles were mainly located on the surface of the nanocomposite specimens.

    Conclusions: Incorporation of silver nanoparticles in the acrylic Resin was evidenced. Moreover, silver was not detected by the detection limit of the atomic absorption spectrophotometer used in this study, even after 120 days of storage in deionized water. Silver nanoparticles are incorporated in the PMMA denture Resin to attain an effective antimicrobial material to help control common infections involving oral mucosal tissues in complete denture wearers.

  • the effect of polymerization cycles on porosity of microwave processed denture Base Resin
    Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, 2004
    Co-Authors: Marco Antonio Compagnoni, D B Barbosa, Raphael Freitas De Souza, Ana Carolina Pero

    Abstract:

    STATEMENT OF PROBLEM: Although most of the physical properties of denture Base Resin polymerized by microwave energy have been shown to be similar to Resins polymerized by the conventional heat polymerization method, the presence of porosity is a problem. PURPOSE: This study evaluated the effect of different microwave polymerization cycles on the porosity of a denture Base Resin designed for microwave polymerization. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-two rectangular Resin specimens (65 x 40 x 5 mm) were divided into 3 experimental groups (A, B, and C; Onda-Cryl, microwave-polymerized Resin) and 1 control group (T; Classico, heat-polymerized Resin), according to the following polymerization cycles: (A) 500 W for 3 minutes, (B) 90 W for 13 minutes+500 W for 90 seconds, (C) 320 W for 3 minutes+0 W for 4 minutes+720 W for 3 minutes, and (T) 74 degrees C for 9 hours. Porosity was calculated by measurement of the specimen volume before and after its immersion in water. Data were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance (alpha=.05). RESULTS: The mean values and SDs of the percent mean porosity were: A=1.05%+/-0.28%, B=0.91%+/-0.15%, C=0.88%+/-0.23%, T=0.93%+/-0.23%. No significant differences were found in mean porosity among the groups evaluated. CONCLUSION: Within the limitations of this study, a denture Base Resin specifically designed for microwave polymerization tested was not affected by different polymerization cycles. Porosity was similar to the conventional heat-polymerized denture Base Resin tested.

Douglas Roberto Monteiro – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Silver Distribution and Release from an Antimicrobial Denture Base Resin Containing Silver Colloidal Nanoparticles
    Journal of Prosthodontics, 2012
    Co-Authors: Douglas Roberto Monteiro, Luiz Fernando Gorup, Aline Satie Takamiya, Emerson R. Camargo, Adhemar Colla Ruvolo Filho, Debora Barros Barbosa

    Abstract:

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate a denture Base Resin containing silver colloidal nanoparticles through morphological analysis to check the distribution and dispersion of these particles in the polymer and by testing the silver release in deionized water at different time periods.\n\nMATERIALS AND METHODS: A Lucitone 550 denture Resin was used, and silver nanoparticles were synthesized by reduction of silver nitrate with sodium citrate. The acrylic Resin was prepared in accordance with the manufacturers’ instructions, and silver nanoparticle suspension was added to the acrylic Resin monomer in different concentrations (0.05, 0.5, and 5 vol% silver colloidal). Controls devoid of silver nanoparticles were included. The specimens were stored in deionized water at 37°C for 7, 15, 30, 60, and 120 days, and each solution was analyzed using atomic absorption spectroscopy.\n\nRESULTS: Silver was not detected in deionized water regardless of the silver nanoparticles added to the Resin and of the storage period. Micrographs showed that with lower concentrations, the distribution of silver nanoparticles was reduced, whereas their dispersion was improved in the polymer. Moreover, after 120 days of storage, nanoparticles were mainly located on the surface of the nanocomposite specimens.\n\nCONCLUSIONS: Incorporation of silver nanoparticles in the acrylic Resin was evidenced. Moreover, silver was not detected by the detection limit of the atomic absorption spectrophotometer used in this study, even after 120 days of storage in deionized water. Silver nanoparticles are incorporated in the PMMA denture Resin to attain an effective antimicrobial material to help control common infections involving oral mucosal tissues in complete denture wearers.

  • silver distribution and release from an antimicrobial denture Base Resin containing silver colloidal nanoparticles
    Journal of Prosthodontics, 2012
    Co-Authors: Douglas Roberto Monteiro, Luiz Fernando Gorup, Aline Satie Takamiya, Emerson R. Camargo, Adhemar Ruvolo C Filho, D B Barbosa

    Abstract:

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate a denture Base Resin containing silver colloidal nanoparticles through morphological analysis to check the distribution and dispersion of these particles in the polymer and by testing the silver release in deionized water at different time periods.

    Materials and Methods: A Lucitone 550 denture Resin was used, and silver nanoparticles were synthesized by reduction of silver nitrate with sodium citrate. The acrylic Resin was prepared in accordance with the manufacturers’ instructions, and silver nanoparticle suspension was added to the acrylic Resin monomer in different concentrations (0.05, 0.5, and 5 vol% silver colloidal). Controls devoid of silver nanoparticles were included. The specimens were stored in deionized water at 37°C for 7, 15, 30, 60, and 120 days, and each solution was analyzed using atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Results: Silver was not detected in deionized water regardless of the silver nanoparticles added to the Resin and of the storage period. Micrographs showed that with lower concentrations, the distribution of silver nanoparticles was reduced, whereas their dispersion was improved in the polymer. Moreover, after 120 days of storage, nanoparticles were mainly located on the surface of the nanocomposite specimens.

    Conclusions: Incorporation of silver nanoparticles in the acrylic Resin was evidenced. Moreover, silver was not detected by the detection limit of the atomic absorption spectrophotometer used in this study, even after 120 days of storage in deionized water. Silver nanoparticles are incorporated in the PMMA denture Resin to attain an effective antimicrobial material to help control common infections involving oral mucosal tissues in complete denture wearers.