Bearing Arrangement - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Bearing Arrangement

The Experts below are selected from a list of 246 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Steve C Galea – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • ISSNIP – Energy harvesting from heavy haul railcar vibrations
    2013 IEEE Eighth International Conference on Intelligent Sensors Sensor Networks and Information Processing, 2013
    Co-Authors: C. Ung, Luke A. Vandewater, Scott D. Moss, Steve C Galea, Kong Chiu, G. Crew

    Abstract:

    Vibration energy harvesting has shown promise as technique for powering sensor networks and wireless devices. Previously, a biaxial vibration energy harvester approach was reported that used a wire-coil transducer and a permanent magnet/ball-Bearing Arrangement. In response to host accelerations the ball-Bearing (i.e. proof mass) oscillates with two translational degrees of freedom, hence producing a varying magnetic field across the coil and therefore inducing an electromagnetic force (EMF) that could potentially be used to power a sensor. Vertical host accelerations, somewhat stochastic in nature, were measured from the bogie of a heavy haul railcar. The measured railcar accelerations were filtered, and replicated in a laboratory environment using a vibration shaker Arrangement. The shaker Arrangement was used to excite a non-optimised prototype energy harvester which employed a steel ball-Bearing proof-mass with 31.8 mm diameter. The harvester, when excited by stochastic vibrations similar to those found on a railcar (and having an RMS acceleration of 4.16 ms-2), produced a peak power of 1.71 mW and a longer term RMS power of 874 μW.

  • Modelling of Mechanical Nonlinearity in an Electromagnetic Vibration Energy Harvester Using a Forced Duffing Equation
    Volume 1: Development and Characterization of Multifunctional Materials; Modeling Simulation and Control of Adaptive Systems; Structural Health Monito, 2012
    Co-Authors: Scott D. Moss, Luke A. Vandewater, Steve C Galea

    Abstract:

    This work reports on the modelling and experimental validation of a bi-axial vibration energy harvesting approach that uses a permanent-magnet/ball-Bearing Arrangement and a wire-coil transducer. The harvester’s behaviour is modelled using a forced Duffing oscillator, and the primary first order steady state resonant solutions are found using the homotopy analysis method (or HAM). Solutions found are shown to compare well with measured Bearing displacements and harvested output power, and are used to predict the wideband frequency response of this type of vibration energy harvester. A prototype harvesting Arrangement produced a maximum output power of 12.9 mW from a 12 Hz, 500 milli-g (or 4.9 m/s2) rms excitation.Copyright © 2012 by Commonwealth of Australia

  • Bi-axial Vibration Energy Harvesting
    , 2012
    Co-Authors: Scott D. Moss, Joshua E Mcleod, Ian Powlesland, Steve C Galea

    Abstract:

    Abstract : This report describes a vibration energy harvesting approach that uses a magnetoelectric (ME) transducer to harvest energy from bi-axial vibrations. The approach is being explored as a potential means of powering in situ structural health monitoring systems embedded within aircraft and other high value engineering assets that experience mechanical vibration. A bi-axial oscillator is created using a permanent-magnet/ball-Bearing Arrangement, which has the added benefit of permitting a relatively compact design. The magnet produces a bi-axial restoring force on the Bearing, and as the Bearing oscillates it steers magnetic field through a magnetostrictive/piezoelectric laminate transducer thereby producing an oscillating charge that can be harvested. A simple laboratory demonstrator of a bi-axial ME harvester was created using a Terfenol-D/lead zirconate titanate/Terfenol-D transducer, and was shown to produce a peak rms power of 121 W from an rms acceleration of 61 mG at 9.8 Hz.

Scott D. Moss – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Non-linear dynamics of a vibration energy harvester by means of the homotopy analysis method
    Journal of Intelligent Material Systems and Structures, 2013
    Co-Authors: Luke A. Vandewater, Scott D. Moss

    Abstract:

    This article reports on the modelling and experimental validation of a vibration energy harvesting approach that uses a permanent-magnet/ball-Bearing Arrangement and a wire-coil transducer. The harvester’s behaviour is modelled using a forced Duffing oscillator modified with quintic non-linearity, and the primary first-order steady-state resonant solutions are found using the homotopy analysis method. These solutions found are shown to compare well with measured ball-Bearing displacements and harvested output power and are used to predict the wideband frequency response of this type of vibration energy harvester. A prototype harvester was found to produce a maximum output power of 16.4 mW from a 14.2 Hz, 400 milli-g excitation.

  • Modelling of a Bi-axial Vibration Energy Harvester
    , 2013
    Co-Authors: Luke A. Vandewater, Scott D. Moss

    Abstract:

    Abstract : This report fully details the techniques involved in the modelling of a nonlinear and bi-axial vibration energy harvesting device. The device utilises a wire-coil electromagnetic (EM) transducer within a nonlinear oscillator created with a permanent-magnet/ball-Bearing Arrangement. The mechanical oscillations of the ball-Bearing in response to bi-axial vibrations in a host structure induce a voltage across the coil, and therefore energy to power an attached device – such as an in-situ structural health monitoring system on an aircraft platform. Modelling the mechanical dynamics and the transduction of the harvester is undertaken, by means of finite element analysis (FEA), the homotopy analysis method (HAM), a novel probability-of-existence approach to vibro-impact, and numeric EM calculations. The models produced demonstrate high accuracy in comparison to a laboratory prototype.

  • ISSNIP – Energy harvesting from heavy haul railcar vibrations
    2013 IEEE Eighth International Conference on Intelligent Sensors Sensor Networks and Information Processing, 2013
    Co-Authors: C. Ung, Luke A. Vandewater, Scott D. Moss, Steve C Galea, Kong Chiu, G. Crew

    Abstract:

    Vibration energy harvesting has shown promise as technique for powering sensor networks and wireless devices. Previously, a biaxial vibration energy harvester approach was reported that used a wire-coil transducer and a permanent magnet/ball-Bearing Arrangement. In response to host accelerations the ball-Bearing (i.e. proof mass) oscillates with two translational degrees of freedom, hence producing a varying magnetic field across the coil and therefore inducing an electromagnetic force (EMF) that could potentially be used to power a sensor. Vertical host accelerations, somewhat stochastic in nature, were measured from the bogie of a heavy haul railcar. The measured railcar accelerations were filtered, and replicated in a laboratory environment using a vibration shaker Arrangement. The shaker Arrangement was used to excite a non-optimised prototype energy harvester which employed a steel ball-Bearing proof-mass with 31.8 mm diameter. The harvester, when excited by stochastic vibrations similar to those found on a railcar (and having an RMS acceleration of 4.16 ms-2), produced a peak power of 1.71 mW and a longer term RMS power of 874 μW.

D J Gordon – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Precision machine tool X–Y stage utilizing a planar air Bearing Arrangement
    Cirp Annals-manufacturing Technology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Kaan Erkorkmaz, J. M. Gorniak, D J Gordon

    Abstract:

    Abstract This paper presents a new X–Y stage concept for precision machine tools. A large work area (300 mm × 300 mm) is achieved using a T-type gantry Arrangement, which locates the work table supported on a vacuum preloaded air Bearing on top of a reference granite surface. Actuation is provided with direct drives that fulfil the functions of motion controls, stiffness enhancement, and vibration damping. Thermal deformations are mitigated by designing internally cooled motor couplings. The error budget for the stage, as well as multivariable control law design and stability analysis, and metrology results are discussed in the paper.

  • Precision machine tool X-Y stage utilizing a planar air Bearing Arrangement
    CIRP Annals – Manufacturing Technology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Kaan Erkorkmaz, J. M. Gorniak, D J Gordon

    Abstract:

    This paper presents a new X-Y stage concept for precision machine tools. A large work area (300 mm ?? 300 mm) is achieved using a T-type gantry Arrangement, which locates the work table supported on a vacuum preloaded air Bearing on top of a reference granite surface. Actuation is provided with direct drives that fulfil the functions of motion controls, stiffness enhancement, and vibration damping. Thermal deformations are mitigated by designing internally cooled motor couplings. The error budget for the stage, as well as multivariable control law design and stability analysis, and metrology results are discussed in the paper. ?? 2010 CIRP.