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Simon Trakhtenberg – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • sugar Beet Pulp and apple pomace dietary fibers improve lipid metabolism in rats fed cholesterol
    Food Chemistry, 2001
    Co-Authors: Maria Leontowicz, Shela Gorinstein, Elzbieta Bartnikowska, Hanna Leontowicz, G Kulasek, Simon Trakhtenberg

    Abstract:

    The eAect of diets supplemented with sugar Beet Pulp fiber (SBP, 10%) and apple pomace fiber (AP, 10%) on lipids and lipids peroxides was investigated in 60 male Wistar rats. The rats were divided into six groups of 10 and adapted to cholesterol-free or 0.3% cholesterol diets. The basal diet (BD) contained wheat meal, barley meal, wheat hulls, meat-bone meal, barley sprouts, skimmed milk, fodder yeast, mineral and vitamin mixtures. The Control group (Control) consumed BD only. To the BD were added 3 g/kg cholesterol (Chol), 100 g/kg dry sugar Beet Pulp fiber (SBP), both 100 g/kg sugar Beet Pulp fiber and 3 g/kg cholesterol (SBP+Chol), 100 g/kg apple pomace fiber (AP), both 100 g/kg apple pomace fiber and 3 g/kg cholesterol (AP+Chol). The experiment lasted 40 days. Plasma total cholesterol (TC), LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (TG), total phospholipids (TPH), HDL phospholipids (HDL-PH), lipid peroxides (LP) and liver TC concentration were measured. Groups did not diAer before the experiment. In the Chol+SBP and the Chol+AP vs. Chol group the sugar Beet Pulp and apple pomace dietary fiber supplemented diet significantly (P<0.05) hindered the rise of plasma lipids: (a) TCˇ2.97 vs. 3.69 mmol/l, ˇ20% and 3.01 vs 3.69 mmol/l, ˇ18.4%, respectively; (b) LDL-C ˇ1.36 vs. 2.02 mmol/l, ˇ32.6% and 1.39 vs. 2.02 mmol/l, ˇ31.2%, respectively; (c) TGˇ0.73 vs. 0.88 mmol/l, and 0.75 vs. 0.88 mmol/l;ˇ17 andˇ14.8%, respectively, and TC in liver (17.1 vs. 24.3 mmol/g,ˇ29.6% and 17.9 v. 24.3 mmol/g,ˇ26.3%, respectively. Sugar Beet and apple pomace fiber-supplemented diets significantly hindered the decrease in HDL-PH (0.79 vs. 0.63 mmol/l,ˇ25.3%, P<0.025 and 0.75 vs. 0.63 mmol/l,ˇ19%, P<0.05, respectively) and decreased the level of TPH (1.34 vs. 1.74 mmol/l,ˇ23%, P<0.005 and 1.37 vs. 1.74 mmol/l,ˇ21.3%, P<0.01, respectively). Both sugar Beet Pulp fiber and apple pomace fiber, in rats fed the basal diet without cholesterol, did not significantly aAect the variables measured. Neither sugar Beet Pulp fiber or apple pomace fiber-supplemented diets influenced the level of lipid peroxides. These results demonstrate that sugar Beet Pulp fiber and to a lesser degree apple pomace fiber possess hypolipidemic properties. This is more evident when sugar Beet Pulp fiber or apple pomace fiber are added to the diet of rats fed cholesterol. The hypolipidemic eAects of both sugar Beet Pulp fiber and apple pomace fiber can be attributed to their water-soluble parts. The sugar Beet Pulp and apple pomace fibers have no antioxidant properties. # 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • Sugar Beet Pulp and apple pomace dietary fibers improve lipid metabolism in rats fed cholesterol
    Food Chemistry, 2001
    Co-Authors: Maria Leontowicz, Shela Gorinstein, Elzbieta Bartnikowska, Hanna Leontowicz, G Kulasek, Simon Trakhtenberg

    Abstract:

    The eAect of diets supplemented with sugar Beet Pulp fiber (SBP, 10%) and apple pomace fiber (AP, 10%) on lipids and lipids peroxides was investigated in 60 male Wistar rats. The rats were divided into six groups of 10 and adapted to cholesterol-free or 0.3% cholesterol diets. The basal diet (BD) contained wheat meal, barley meal, wheat hulls, meat-bone meal, barley sprouts, skimmed milk, fodder yeast, mineral and vitamin mixtures. The Control group (Control) consumed BD only. To the BD were added 3 g/kg cholesterol (Chol), 100 g/kg dry sugar Beet Pulp fiber (SBP), both 100 g/kg sugar Beet Pulp fiber and 3 g/kg cholesterol (SBP+Chol), 100 g/kg apple pomace fiber (AP), both 100 g/kg apple pomace fiber and 3 g/kg cholesterol (AP+Chol). The experiment lasted 40 days. Plasma total cholesterol (TC), LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (TG), total phospholipids (TPH), HDL phospholipids (HDL-PH), lipid peroxides (LP) and liver TC concentration were measured. Groups did not diAer before the experiment. In the Chol+SBP and the Chol+AP vs. Chol group the sugar Beet Pulp and apple pomace dietary fiber supplemented diet significantly (P

M S Allen – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • pelleted Beet Pulp substituted for high moisture corn 1 effects on feed intake chewing behavior and milk production of lactating dairy cows
    Journal of Dairy Science, 2003
    Co-Authors: J A Voelker, M S Allen

    Abstract:

    Abstract The effects of increasing concentrations of dried, pelleted Beet Pulp substituted for high-moisture corn on intake, milk production, and chewing behavior were evaluated using eight ruminally and duodenally cannulated multiparous Holstein cows in a duplicated 4×4 Latin square design with 21-d periods. Cows were 79±17 (mean±SD) d in milk at the beginning of the experiment. Experimental diets with 40% forage (corn silage and alfalfa silage) and 60% concentrate contained 0, 6.1, 12.1, or 24.3% Beet Pulp substituted for high-moisture corn on a dry matter basis. Diet concentrations of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and starch were 24.3 and 34.6% (0% Beet Pulp), 26.2 and 30.5% (6% Beet Pulp), 28.0 and 26.5% (12% Beet Pulp), and 31.6 and 18.4% (24% Beet Pulp), respectively. Increasing Beet Pulp in the diet caused a linear decrease in dry matter intake (DMI). Time spent eating per day and per kilogram of DMI increased, and sorting against NDF tended to increase, with added Beet Pulp. Substituting Beet Pulp for corn caused a quadratic response in milk fat yield, with the highest yield for the 6% Beet Pulp treatment. A tendency was detected for a similar quadratic response in 3.5% fat-corrected milk yield. Lower plasma insulin concentration may have resulted in lower body condition gain for cows fed diets with higher Beet Pulp concentration. Partial substitution of pelleted Beet Pulp for high-moisture corn decreased intake but also may have permitted greater fat-corrected milk yield.

  • pelleted Beet Pulp substituted for high moisture corn 2 effects on digestion and ruminal digestion kinetics in lactating dairy cows
    Journal of Dairy Science, 2003
    Co-Authors: J A Voelker, M S Allen

    Abstract:

    Abstract The effects of increasing concentrations of dried, pelleted Beet Pulp substituted for high-moisture corn on digestion and ruminal digestion kinetics were evaluated using eight ruminally and duodenally cannulated multiparous Holstein cows in a duplicated 4×4 Latin square design with 21-d periods. Cows were 79±17 (mean±SD) d in milk at the beginning of the experiment. Experimental diets with 40% forage (corn silage and alfalfa silage) and 60% concentrate contained 0, 6.1, 12.1, or 24.3% Beet Pulp substituted for high-moisture corn on a dry matter basis. Diet concentrations of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and starch were 24.3 and 34.6% (0% Beet Pulp), 26.2 and 30.5% (6% Beet Pulp), 28.0 and 26.5% (12% Beet Pulp), and 31.6 and 18.4% (24% Beet Pulp), respectively. Ruminal dry matter pool decreased and NDF turnover rate increased as dietary Beet Pulp content increased. Potentially digestible NDF was digested more extensively and at a faster rate in the rumen with increasing Beet Pulp, resulting in increased total tract NDF digestibility. Passage rates of potentially digestible NDF and of indigestible NDF were not affected by treatment. True ruminal digestibility of starch decreased with increasing Beet Pulp substitution. This was caused by a linear increase in starch passage rate, possibly because of increasing ruminal fill, and a linear decrease in digestion rate of starch in the rumen, possibly because of reduced amylolytic enzyme activity for lower-starch diets. Although true ruminal starch digestibility decreased when more Beet Pulp was fed, whole tract starch digestibility was not affected because of compensatory digestion of starch in the intestines. Due to more thorough digestion of fiber in diets containing more Beet Pulp, whole-tract digestibility of organic matter increased linearly, and intake of digestible organic matter was not affected. Partially replacing high-moisture corn with Beet Pulp in low-forage diets increased fiber digestibility without reducing whole-tract starch digestibility.

  • pelleted Beet Pulp substituted for high moisture corn 3 effects on ruminal fermentation ph and microbial protein efficiency in lactating dairy cows
    Journal of Dairy Science, 2003
    Co-Authors: J A Voelker, M S Allen

    Abstract:

    Abstract The effects of increasing concentrations of dried, pelleted Beet Pulp substituted for high-moisture corn on ruminal fermentation, pH, and microbial efficiency were evaluated using eight ruminally and duodenally cannulated multiparous Holstein cows in a duplicated 4×4 Latin square design with 21-d periods. Cows were 79±17 (mean±SD) DIM at the beginning of the experiment. Experimental diets with 40% forage (corn silage and alfalfa silage) and 60% concentrate contained 0, 6.1, 12.1, or 24.3% Beet Pulp substituted for high-moisture corn on a DM basis. Diet concentrations of NDF and starch were 24.3 and 34.6% (0% Beet Pulp), 26.2 and 30.5% (6% Beet Pulp), 28.0, and 26.5% (12% Beet Pulp), and 31.6 and 18.4% (24% Beet Pulp), respectively. Substituting Beet Pulp for corn did not affect daily mean or minimum ruminal pH but tended to reduce pH range. Ruminal acetate:propionate responded in a positive exponential relationship to added Beet Pulp. Rate of valerate absorption from the rumen was not affected by treatment. Substituting Beet Pulp for corn up to 24% of diet DM did not affect efficiency of ruminal microbial protein production, expressed as microbial N flow to the duodenum as a percentage of OM truly digested in the rumen. Microbial efficiency was not correlated to mean pH or daily minimum pH. While microbial efficiency was not directly related to concentration of Beet Pulp fed, it was positively correlated with passage rate of particulate matter, as represented by starch and indigestible NDF, probably due to reduced turnover of microbial protein in the rumen.

Maria Leontowicz – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • sugar Beet Pulp and apple pomace dietary fibers improve lipid metabolism in rats fed cholesterol
    Food Chemistry, 2001
    Co-Authors: Maria Leontowicz, Shela Gorinstein, Elzbieta Bartnikowska, Hanna Leontowicz, G Kulasek, Simon Trakhtenberg

    Abstract:

    The eAect of diets supplemented with sugar Beet Pulp fiber (SBP, 10%) and apple pomace fiber (AP, 10%) on lipids and lipids peroxides was investigated in 60 male Wistar rats. The rats were divided into six groups of 10 and adapted to cholesterol-free or 0.3% cholesterol diets. The basal diet (BD) contained wheat meal, barley meal, wheat hulls, meat-bone meal, barley sprouts, skimmed milk, fodder yeast, mineral and vitamin mixtures. The Control group (Control) consumed BD only. To the BD were added 3 g/kg cholesterol (Chol), 100 g/kg dry sugar Beet Pulp fiber (SBP), both 100 g/kg sugar Beet Pulp fiber and 3 g/kg cholesterol (SBP+Chol), 100 g/kg apple pomace fiber (AP), both 100 g/kg apple pomace fiber and 3 g/kg cholesterol (AP+Chol). The experiment lasted 40 days. Plasma total cholesterol (TC), LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (TG), total phospholipids (TPH), HDL phospholipids (HDL-PH), lipid peroxides (LP) and liver TC concentration were measured. Groups did not diAer before the experiment. In the Chol+SBP and the Chol+AP vs. Chol group the sugar Beet Pulp and apple pomace dietary fiber supplemented diet significantly (P<0.05) hindered the rise of plasma lipids: (a) TCˇ2.97 vs. 3.69 mmol/l, ˇ20% and 3.01 vs 3.69 mmol/l, ˇ18.4%, respectively; (b) LDL-C ˇ1.36 vs. 2.02 mmol/l, ˇ32.6% and 1.39 vs. 2.02 mmol/l, ˇ31.2%, respectively; (c) TGˇ0.73 vs. 0.88 mmol/l, and 0.75 vs. 0.88 mmol/l;ˇ17 andˇ14.8%, respectively, and TC in liver (17.1 vs. 24.3 mmol/g,ˇ29.6% and 17.9 v. 24.3 mmol/g,ˇ26.3%, respectively. Sugar Beet and apple pomace fiber-supplemented diets significantly hindered the decrease in HDL-PH (0.79 vs. 0.63 mmol/l,ˇ25.3%, P<0.025 and 0.75 vs. 0.63 mmol/l,ˇ19%, P<0.05, respectively) and decreased the level of TPH (1.34 vs. 1.74 mmol/l,ˇ23%, P<0.005 and 1.37 vs. 1.74 mmol/l,ˇ21.3%, P<0.01, respectively). Both sugar Beet Pulp fiber and apple pomace fiber, in rats fed the basal diet without cholesterol, did not significantly aAect the variables measured. Neither sugar Beet Pulp fiber or apple pomace fiber-supplemented diets influenced the level of lipid peroxides. These results demonstrate that sugar Beet Pulp fiber and to a lesser degree apple pomace fiber possess hypolipidemic properties. This is more evident when sugar Beet Pulp fiber or apple pomace fiber are added to the diet of rats fed cholesterol. The hypolipidemic eAects of both sugar Beet Pulp fiber and apple pomace fiber can be attributed to their water-soluble parts. The sugar Beet Pulp and apple pomace fibers have no antioxidant properties. # 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • Sugar Beet Pulp and apple pomace dietary fibers improve lipid metabolism in rats fed cholesterol
    Food Chemistry, 2001
    Co-Authors: Maria Leontowicz, Shela Gorinstein, Elzbieta Bartnikowska, Hanna Leontowicz, G Kulasek, Simon Trakhtenberg

    Abstract:

    The eAect of diets supplemented with sugar Beet Pulp fiber (SBP, 10%) and apple pomace fiber (AP, 10%) on lipids and lipids peroxides was investigated in 60 male Wistar rats. The rats were divided into six groups of 10 and adapted to cholesterol-free or 0.3% cholesterol diets. The basal diet (BD) contained wheat meal, barley meal, wheat hulls, meat-bone meal, barley sprouts, skimmed milk, fodder yeast, mineral and vitamin mixtures. The Control group (Control) consumed BD only. To the BD were added 3 g/kg cholesterol (Chol), 100 g/kg dry sugar Beet Pulp fiber (SBP), both 100 g/kg sugar Beet Pulp fiber and 3 g/kg cholesterol (SBP+Chol), 100 g/kg apple pomace fiber (AP), both 100 g/kg apple pomace fiber and 3 g/kg cholesterol (AP+Chol). The experiment lasted 40 days. Plasma total cholesterol (TC), LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (TG), total phospholipids (TPH), HDL phospholipids (HDL-PH), lipid peroxides (LP) and liver TC concentration were measured. Groups did not diAer before the experiment. In the Chol+SBP and the Chol+AP vs. Chol group the sugar Beet Pulp and apple pomace dietary fiber supplemented diet significantly (P