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Behaviour Change

The Experts below are selected from a list of 101451 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Susan Michie – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Designing and implementing Behaviour Change interventions to improve population health.
    Journal of health services research & policy, 2020
    Co-Authors: Susan Michie

    Abstract:

    Improved population health depends on changing Behaviour: of those who are healthy (e.g. stopping smoking), those who are ill (e.g. adhering to health advice) and those delivering health care. To design more effective Behaviour Change interventions, we need more investment in developing the scientific methods for studying Behaviour Change. Behavioural science is relevant to all phases of the process of implementing evidence-based health care: developing evidence through primary studies, synthesizing the findings in systematic reviews, translating evidence into guidelines and practice recommendations, and implementing these in practice. ‘Behaviour Change: Implementation and Health’, the last research programme to be funded within the MRC HSRC, aimed to develop innovative ways of applying theories and techniques of Behaviour Change to understand and improve the implementation of evidence-based practice, as a key step to improving health. It focused on four areas of study that apply Behaviour Change theory:defining and developing a taxonomy of Behaviour Change techniques to allow replication of studies and the possibility of accumulating evidence; conducting systematic reviews, by categorizing and synthesizing interventions on the basis of Behaviour Change theory; investigating the process by which evidence is translated into guideline recommendations for practice; developing a theoretical framework to apply to understanding implementation problems and designing interventions. This work will contribute to advancing the science of Behaviour Change by providing tools for conceptualizing and defining intervention content, and linking techniques of Behaviour Change to their theoretical base.

  • Representation of Behaviour Change interventions and their evaluation: Development of the Upper Level of the Behaviour Change Intervention Ontology
    Wellcome Open Research, 2020
    Co-Authors: Susan Michie, Robert West, Emma Norris, Marie Johnston, Michael P. Kelly, Ailbhe N. Finnerty, Alison J. Wright, Marta M. Marques, James Thomas, Janna Hastings

    Abstract:

    Background: Behaviour Change interventions (BCI), their contexts and evaluation methods are heterogeneous, making it difficult to synthesise evidence and make recommendations for real-world policy and practice. Ontologies provide a means for addressing this. They represent knowledge formally as entities and relationships using a common language able to cross disciplinary boundaries and topic domains. This paper reports the development of the upper level of the Behaviour Change Intervention Ontology (BCIO), which provides a systematic way to characterise BCIs, their contexts and their evaluations. Methods: Development took place in four steps. (1) Entities and relationships were identified by Behavioural and social science experts, based on their knowledge of evidence and theory, and their practical experience of Behaviour Change interventions and evaluations. (2) The outputs of the first step were critically examined by a wider group of experts, including the study ontology expert and those experienced in annotating relevant literature using the initial ontology entities. The outputs of the second step were tested by (3) feedback from three external international experts in ontologies and (4) application of the prototype upper-level BCIO to annotating published reports; this informed the final development of the upper-level BCIO. Results: The final upper-level BCIO specifies 42 entities, including the BCI scenario, elaborated across 21 entities and 7 relationship types, and the BCI evaluation study comprising 10 entities and 9 relationship types. BCI scenario entities include the Behaviour Change intervention (content and delivery), outcome Behaviour, mechanism of action, and its context, which includes population and setting. These entities have corresponding entities relating to the planning and reporting of interventions and their evaluations. Conclusions: The upper level of the BCIO provides a comprehensive and systematic framework for representing BCIs, their contexts and their evaluations.

  • Ontologies relevant to Behaviour Change interventions: a method for their development
    Wellcome Open Research, 2020
    Co-Authors: Alison J. Wright, Robert West, Emma Norris, Marie Johnston, Michael P. Kelly, Ailbhe N. Finnerty, Janna Hastings, Marta M. Marques, Susan Michie

    Abstract:

    Background: Behaviour and Behaviour Change are integral to many aspects of wellbeing and sustainability. However, reporting Behaviour Change interventions accurately and synthesising evidence about effective interventions is hindered by lacking a shared, scientific terminology to describe intervention characteristics. Ontologies are knowledge structures that provide controlled vocabularies to help unify and connect scientific fields. To date, there is no published guidance on the specific methods required to develop ontologies relevant to Behaviour Change. We report the creation and refinement of a method for developing ontologies that make up the Behaviour Change Intervention Ontology (BCIO). Aims: (1) To describe the development method of the BCIO and explain its rationale; (2) To provide guidance on implementing the activities within the development method. Method and results: The method for developing ontologies relevant to Behaviour Change interventions was constructed by considering principles of good practice in ontology development and identifying key activities required to follow those principles. The method’s details were refined through application to developing two ontologies. The resulting ontology development method involved: (1) defining the ontology’s scope; (2) identifying key entities; (3) refining the ontology through an iterative process of literature annotation, discussion and revision; (4) expert stakeholder review; (5) testing inter-rater reliability; (6) specifying relationships between entities, and; (7) disseminating and maintaining the ontology. Guidance is provided for conducting relevant activities for each step.  Conclusions: We have developed a detailed method for creating ontologies relevant to Behaviour Change interventions, together with practical guidance for each step, reflecting principles of good practice in ontology development. The most novel aspects of the method are the use of formal mechanisms for literature annotation and expert stakeholder review to develop and improve the ontology content. We suggest the mnemonic SELAR3, representing the method’s first six steps as Scope, Entities, Literature Annotation, Review, Reliability, Relationships.

Marie Johnston – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • What Competences Are Required to Deliver Person-Person Behaviour Change Interventions: Development of a Health Behaviour Change Competency Framework.
    International journal of behavioral medicine, 2020
    Co-Authors: Diane Dixon, Marie Johnston

    Abstract:

    The competence of the person delivering person-to-person Behaviour Change interventions may influence the effectiveness of the intervention. However, we lack a framework for describing the range of competences involved. The objective of the current work was to develop a competency framework for health Behaviour Change interventions.
    A preliminary framework was developed by two judges rating the relevance of items in the competency framework for cognitive Behaviour therapies; adding relevant items from reviews and other competency frameworks; and obtaining feedback from potential users on a draft framework. The Health Behaviour Change Competency Framework (HBCCF) was used to analyse the competency content of smoking cessation manuals.
    Judges identified 194 competency items as relevant, which were organised into two domains: foundation (12 competency topics comprising 56 competencies) and Behaviour Change (12 topics, 54 competencies); several of the 54 and 56 competencies were composed of sub-competencies (84 subcompetencies in total). Smoking cessation manuals included 14 competency topics from the foundation and Behaviour Change competency domains.
    The HBCCF provides a structured method for assessing and reporting competency to deliver Behaviour Change interventions. It can be applied to assess a practitioner’s competency and training needs and to identify the competencies needed for a particular intervention. To date, it has been used in self-assessments and in developing training programmes. We propose the HBCCF as a practical tool for researchers, employers, and those who design and provide training. We envisage the HBCFF maturing and adapting as evidence that identifies the essential elements required for the effective delivery of Behaviour Change interventions emerges.

  • What Competences Are Required to Deliver Person-Person Behaviour Change Interventions: Development of a Health Behaviour Change Competency Framework
    International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 2020
    Co-Authors: Diane Dixon, Marie Johnston

    Abstract:

    Background The competence of the person delivering person-to-person Behaviour Change interventions may influence the effectiveness of the intervention. However, we lack a framework for describing the range of competences involved. The objective of the current work was to develop a competency framework for health Behaviour Change interventions. Method A preliminary framework was developed by two judges rating the relevance of items in the competency framework for cognitive Behaviour therapies; adding relevant items from reviews and other competency frameworks; and obtaining feedback from potential users on a draft framework. The Health Behaviour Change Competency Framework (HBCCF) was used to analyse the competency content of smoking cessation manuals. Results Judges identified 194 competency items as relevant, which were organised into two domains: foundation (12 competency topics comprising 56 competencies) and Behaviour Change (12 topics, 54 competencies); several of the 54 and 56 competencies were composed of sub-competencies (84 subcompetencies in total). Smoking cessation manuals included 14 competency topics from the foundation and Behaviour Change competency domains. Conclusion The HBCCF provides a structured method for assessing and reporting competency to deliver Behaviour Change interventions. It can be applied to assess a practitioner’s competency and training needs and to identify the competencies needed for a particular intervention. To date, it has been used in self-assessments and in developing training programmes. We propose the HBCCF as a practical tool for researchers, employers, and those who design and provide training. We envisage the HBCFF maturing and adapting as evidence that identifies the essential elements required for the effective delivery of Behaviour Change interventions emerges.

  • Ontologies relevant to Behaviour Change interventions: a method for their development
    Wellcome Open Research, 2020
    Co-Authors: Alison J. Wright, Robert West, Emma Norris, Marie Johnston, Michael P. Kelly, Ailbhe N. Finnerty, Janna Hastings, Marta M. Marques, Susan Michie

    Abstract:

    Background: Behaviour and Behaviour Change are integral to many aspects of wellbeing and sustainability. However, reporting Behaviour Change interventions accurately and synthesising evidence about effective interventions is hindered by lacking a shared, scientific terminology to describe intervention characteristics. Ontologies are knowledge structures that provide controlled vocabularies to help unify and connect scientific fields. To date, there is no published guidance on the specific methods required to develop ontologies relevant to Behaviour Change. We report the creation and refinement of a method for developing ontologies that make up the Behaviour Change Intervention Ontology (BCIO). Aims: (1) To describe the development method of the BCIO and explain its rationale; (2) To provide guidance on implementing the activities within the development method. Method and results: The method for developing ontologies relevant to Behaviour Change interventions was constructed by considering principles of good practice in ontology development and identifying key activities required to follow those principles. The method’s details were refined through application to developing two ontologies. The resulting ontology development method involved: (1) defining the ontology’s scope; (2) identifying key entities; (3) refining the ontology through an iterative process of literature annotation, discussion and revision; (4) expert stakeholder review; (5) testing inter-rater reliability; (6) specifying relationships between entities, and; (7) disseminating and maintaining the ontology. Guidance is provided for conducting relevant activities for each step.  Conclusions: We have developed a detailed method for creating ontologies relevant to Behaviour Change interventions, together with practical guidance for each step, reflecting principles of good practice in ontology development. The most novel aspects of the method are the use of formal mechanisms for literature annotation and expert stakeholder review to develop and improve the ontology content. We suggest the mnemonic SELAR3, representing the method’s first six steps as Scope, Entities, Literature Annotation, Review, Reliability, Relationships.

Julita Vassileva – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • IUI – Tutorial on Personalization for Behaviour Change
    Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces – IUI '15, 2015
    Co-Authors: Judith Masthoff, Julita Vassileva

    Abstract:

    Digital Behaviour interventions aim to encourage and support people to Change their Behaviour, for their own or communal benefits. Personalization plays an important role in this, as the most effective persuasive and motivational strategies are likely to depend on user characteristics. This tutorial covers the role of personalization in Behaviour Change technology, and methods and techniques to design personalized Behaviour Change technology.

  • Tutorial on Personalization for Behaviour Change
    Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces – IUI '15, 2015
    Co-Authors: Judith Masthoff, Julita Vassileva

    Abstract:

    Digital Behaviour interventions aim to encourage and support people to Change their Behaviour, for their own or communal benefits. Personalization plays an important role in this, as the most effective persuasive and motivational strategies are likely to depend on user characteristics. This tutorial covers the role of personalization in Behaviour Change technology, and methods and techniques to design personalized Behaviour Change technology.