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Beta Neoendorphin

The Experts below are selected from a list of 24 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Richard J. Bodnar – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Endopeptidase 24.15 inhibition and opioid antinociception
    Psychopharmacology, 1992
    Co-Authors: Benjamin Kest, Marion Orlowski, Richard J. Bodnar

    Abstract:

    Whereas endopeptidase 24.11 cleaves the Gly-Phe bond in both Met- and Leu-enkephalin, endopeptidase 24.15 rapidly converts dynorphin A_1–8, alpha and BetaNeoendorphin into Leu-enkephalin, and Met-enkephalin-Arg^6-Gly^7-Leu^8 (MERGL) into Met-enkephalin. Inhibitors of both endopeptidase 24.11 and endopeptidase 24.15 each produce antinociception, and inhibitors of endopeptidase 24.11 increase the magnitude of enkephalin antinociception. The present study compared the central antinociceptive effect of an inhibitor of endopeptidase 24.15, N-[1-(R-S)-carboxy-3-phenyl-propyl]-Ala-Ala-Phe-p-aminobenzoate (cFP-AAF-pAB) with one of endopeptidase 24.11 N-[1-(RS)-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl]-Phe-p-aminobenzoate (cFP-F-pAB) upon central opioid antinociception induced by MERGL, met-enkephalin and dynorphin A_1–8. cFP-AAF-pAB, but not cFP-F-pAB increased MERGL antinociception on the tail-flick and jump tests. In contrast, cFP-F-pAB, but not cFP-AAF-pAB increased met-enkephalin antinociception. Whereas central dynorphin A_1–8 failed to induce antinociception itself, co-administration of cFP-AAF-pAB and dynorphin A_1–8 increased nociceptive thresholds. This effect was not accompanied by motor dysfunction, but was blocked by systemic pretreatment with naloxone or central pretreatment with naltrexone or nor-binaltorphamine, but not Beta-funaltrexamine. These data indicate that endopeptidase 24.15 may be responsible for the degradation of specific opioid peptides (e.g., MERGL, dynorphin), and that this process may prevent the full expression of their antinociceptive properties.

Benjamin Kest – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Endopeptidase 24.15 inhibition and opioid antinociception
    Psychopharmacology, 1992
    Co-Authors: Benjamin Kest, Marion Orlowski, Richard J. Bodnar

    Abstract:

    Whereas endopeptidase 24.11 cleaves the Gly-Phe bond in both Met- and Leu-enkephalin, endopeptidase 24.15 rapidly converts dynorphin A_1–8, alpha and BetaNeoendorphin into Leu-enkephalin, and Met-enkephalin-Arg^6-Gly^7-Leu^8 (MERGL) into Met-enkephalin. Inhibitors of both endopeptidase 24.11 and endopeptidase 24.15 each produce antinociception, and inhibitors of endopeptidase 24.11 increase the magnitude of enkephalin antinociception. The present study compared the central antinociceptive effect of an inhibitor of endopeptidase 24.15, N-[1-(R-S)-carboxy-3-phenyl-propyl]-Ala-Ala-Phe-p-aminobenzoate (cFP-AAF-pAB) with one of endopeptidase 24.11 N-[1-(RS)-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl]-Phe-p-aminobenzoate (cFP-F-pAB) upon central opioid antinociception induced by MERGL, met-enkephalin and dynorphin A_1–8. cFP-AAF-pAB, but not cFP-F-pAB increased MERGL antinociception on the tail-flick and jump tests. In contrast, cFP-F-pAB, but not cFP-AAF-pAB increased met-enkephalin antinociception. Whereas central dynorphin A_1–8 failed to induce antinociception itself, co-administration of cFP-AAF-pAB and dynorphin A_1–8 increased nociceptive thresholds. This effect was not accompanied by motor dysfunction, but was blocked by systemic pretreatment with naloxone or central pretreatment with naltrexone or nor-binaltorphamine, but not Beta-funaltrexamine. These data indicate that endopeptidase 24.15 may be responsible for the degradation of specific opioid peptides (e.g., MERGL, dynorphin), and that this process may prevent the full expression of their antinociceptive properties.

L F Tseng – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Dynorphins other than dynorphin A(1-17) lack spinal antianalgesic activity but do act on dynorphin A(1-17) receptors.
    Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, 1991
    Co-Authors: Jodie J. Rady, J M Fujimoto, L F Tseng

    Abstract:

    In recent publications we have proposed that dynorphin (Dyn) A(1-17) functions as an antianalgesic modulator to oppose opioid-induced antinociception in mice. In the present experiments using the tail-flick response in mice, other Dyns [Dyn A(1-8), Dyn A(1-13), Dyn A(2-17), Dyn B and alpha- and BetaNeoendorphin] when administered intrathecally (i.t.) were shown not to have antianalgesic activity even at high doses (0.5-1 pmol). These Dyns, i.t., did not antagonize the antinociception produced by physostigmine administered i.c.v. or morphine given i.t. These Dyns lacked the intrinsic antianalgesic activity of Dyn A(1-17). However, they had affinity for Dyn A(1-17) receptors as shown in several ways. 1) The antagonism of physostigmine antinociception produced by Dyn A(1-17) given i.t. was reversed by these Dyns given together with Dyn A(1-17). 2) The effect of endogenously released Dyn A(1-17) was reversed. Administered i.c.v., clonidine simultaneously activates antinociceptive and antianalgesic systems [latter mediated spinally by Dyn A(1-17) release]. Thus, these Dyns given i.t. inhibited the action of endogenously released Dyn A(1-17) and allowed the full manifestation of the antinociceptive action of clonidine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)