Bethesda System - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Bethesda System

The Experts below are selected from a list of 4494 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Edmund S Cibas – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • The role of thyroid fine needle aspiration cytology and the Bethesda System for reporting thyroid
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Massimo Bongiovanni, Edmund S Cibas, William C. Faquin

    Abstract:

    Thyroid fine needle aspiration (FNA) is among the most commonly performed non-gynaecologic cytologic procedures and the single most effective tool for guiding the initial management of a patient with a thyroid nodule. Its acceptance as a reliable preoperative test relies on its high sensitivity and specificity. The recently developed Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytopathology, has advanced the field by promoting a standard reporting terminology for thyroid aspirates. In addition, it allows communication with the referring physician to occur in terms that are unambiguous, reproducible, and clinically helpful.

  • Fine-Needle Aspiration of the Thyroid Gland: The 2017 Bethesda System
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: William C. Faquin, Guido Fadda, Edmund S Cibas

    Abstract:

    Abstract Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is an essential test in the evaluation of a patient with a thyroid nodule. The result of the FNA determines, in large part, whether a patient can be followed clinically or referred for surgery. Guidelines have been established for selecting a nodule for aspiration. The Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytopathology (TBSRTC) has standardized the reporting of thyroid cytopathology and consists of the following six diagnostic categories: nondiagnostic, benign, atypia of undetermined significance/ follicular lesion of undetermined significance (AUS/FLUS), follicular neoplasm, suspicious for malignancy, and malignant.

  • the 2017 Bethesda System for reporting thyroid cytopathology
    Thyroid, 2017
    Co-Authors: Edmund S Cibas

    Abstract:

    The Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytopathology (TBSRTC) established a standardized, category-based reporting System for thyroid fine-needle aspiration (FNA) specimens. The 2017 revision reaffirms that every thyroid FNA report should begin with one of six diagnostic categories, the names of which remain unchanged since they were first introduced: (i) nondiagnostic or unsatisfactory; (ii) benign; (iii) atypia of undetermined significance (AUS) or follicular lesion of undetermined significance (FLUS); (iv) follicular neoplasm or suspicious for a follicular neoplasm; (v) suspicious for malignancy; and (vi) malignant. There is a choice of two different names for some of the categories. A laboratory should choose the one it prefers and use it exclusively for that category. Synonymous terms (e.g., AUS and FLUS) should not be used to denote two distinct interpretations. Each category has an implied cancer risk that ranges from 0% to 3% for the “benign” category to virtually 100% for the “malignant” categ…

Helen H. Wang – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • reporting thyroid fna before and after implementation of the Bethesda System one institution s experience
    Diagnostic Cytopathology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Kathriel J. Brister, Remmi Singh, Helen H. Wang

    Abstract:

    Background

    The Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytopathology was published in 2008 and was implemented at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) in June, 2010. Prior to this date, our diagnostic scheme was similar to the Bethesda System, except for the category of “Atypia/Follicular Lesion of Undetermined Significance” (AUS). This study evaluates the impact of the Bethesda System on the rate and the positive predictive value (PPV) of the diagnostic categories at BIDMC.

    Methods

    We performed a retrospective review of all thyroid fine-needle aspirations (FNAs) during the time periods January, 2006 to November, 2008 and June, 2010 to July, 2011 and the subsequent thyroidectomy specimens.

    Results

    Post-Bethesda System, diagnoses that are equivocal for diverse reasons and which have wide-ranging PPVs are now all grouped into the AUS category, and the proportion of cases that are in the atypical/AUS category rose from 3.7% in the pre-Bethesda period to 12% in the post-Bethesda period.

    Conclusion

    The AUS category has a PPV approaching 50% in our lab. This creates uncertainty regarding the appropriate management for this category and may cause unnecessary overuse of molecular testing for cases in the AUS category. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2015;43:28–31. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • Reporting thyroid FNA before and after implementation of the Bethesda System—one institution’s experience
    Diagnostic Cytopathology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Kathriel J. Brister, Remmi S. Singh, Helen H. Wang

    Abstract:

    Background

    The Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytopathology was published in 2008 and was implemented at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) in June, 2010. Prior to this date, our diagnostic scheme was similar to the Bethesda System, except for the category of “Atypia/Follicular Lesion of Undetermined Significance” (AUS). This study evaluates the impact of the Bethesda System on the rate and the positive predictive value (PPV) of the diagnostic categories at BIDMC.

    Methods

    We performed a retrospective review of all thyroid fine-needle aspirations (FNAs) during the time periods January, 2006 to November, 2008 and June, 2010 to July, 2011 and the subsequent thyroidectomy specimens.

    Results

    Post-Bethesda System, diagnoses that are equivocal for diverse reasons and which have wide-ranging PPVs are now all grouped into the AUS category, and the proportion of cases that are in the atypical/AUS category rose from 3.7% in the pre-Bethesda period to 12% in the post-Bethesda period.

    Conclusion

    The AUS category has a PPV approaching 50% in our lab. This creates uncertainty regarding the appropriate management for this category and may cause unnecessary overuse of molecular testing for cases in the AUS category. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2015;43:28–31. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • eliminating the atypia of undetermined significance follicular lesion of undetermined significance category from the Bethesda System for reporting thyroid cytopathology
    American Journal of Clinical Pathology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Remmi S. Singh, Helen H. Wang

    Abstract:

    The “Atypia of Undetermined Significance/Follicular Lesion of Undetermined Significance (AUS/FLUS)” category in the Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytology is heterogeneous and includes both specimens with borderline cellularity/compromised quality and those with genuine atypia. We have used a reporting scheme that is similar to the Bethesda System but does not include an AUS/FLUS category. We retrospectively reviewed all reports on thyroid FNA and thyroidectomy specimens submitted to the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center from January 2006 to December 2008. The positive predictive values for various categories and subcategories in this scheme demonstrate that the AUS/FLUS category can be eliminated to provide information for the most appropriate management of patients with thyroid nodules.

Remmi S. Singh – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Reporting thyroid FNA before and after implementation of the Bethesda System—one institution’s experience
    Diagnostic Cytopathology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Kathriel J. Brister, Remmi S. Singh, Helen H. Wang

    Abstract:

    Background

    The Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytopathology was published in 2008 and was implemented at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) in June, 2010. Prior to this date, our diagnostic scheme was similar to the Bethesda System, except for the category of “Atypia/Follicular Lesion of Undetermined Significance” (AUS). This study evaluates the impact of the Bethesda System on the rate and the positive predictive value (PPV) of the diagnostic categories at BIDMC.

    Methods

    We performed a retrospective review of all thyroid fine-needle aspirations (FNAs) during the time periods January, 2006 to November, 2008 and June, 2010 to July, 2011 and the subsequent thyroidectomy specimens.

    Results

    Post-Bethesda System, diagnoses that are equivocal for diverse reasons and which have wide-ranging PPVs are now all grouped into the AUS category, and the proportion of cases that are in the atypical/AUS category rose from 3.7% in the pre-Bethesda period to 12% in the post-Bethesda period.

    Conclusion

    The AUS category has a PPV approaching 50% in our lab. This creates uncertainty regarding the appropriate management for this category and may cause unnecessary overuse of molecular testing for cases in the AUS category. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2015;43:28–31. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • eliminating the atypia of undetermined significance follicular lesion of undetermined significance category from the Bethesda System for reporting thyroid cytopathology
    American Journal of Clinical Pathology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Remmi S. Singh, Helen H. Wang

    Abstract:

    The “Atypia of Undetermined Significance/Follicular Lesion of Undetermined Significance (AUS/FLUS)” category in the Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytology is heterogeneous and includes both specimens with borderline cellularity/compromised quality and those with genuine atypia. We have used a reporting scheme that is similar to the Bethesda System but does not include an AUS/FLUS category. We retrospectively reviewed all reports on thyroid FNA and thyroidectomy specimens submitted to the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center from January 2006 to December 2008. The positive predictive values for various categories and subcategories in this scheme demonstrate that the AUS/FLUS category can be eliminated to provide information for the most appropriate management of patients with thyroid nodules.

  • Eliminating the “Atypia of Undetermined Significance/Follicular Lesion of Undetermined Significance” category from the Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytopathology.
    American Journal of Clinical Pathology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Remmi S. Singh, Helen H. Wang

    Abstract:

    The “Atypia of Undetermined Significance/Follicular Lesion of Undetermined Significance (AUS/FLUS)” category in the Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytology is heterogeneous and includes both specimens with borderline cellularity/compromised quality and those with genuine atypia. We have used a reporting scheme that is similar to the Bethesda System but does not include an AUS/FLUS category. We retrospectively reviewed all reports on thyroid FNA and thyroidectomy specimens submitted to the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center from January 2006 to December 2008. The positive predictive values for various categories and subcategories in this scheme demonstrate that the AUS/FLUS category can be eliminated to provide information for the most appropriate management of patients with thyroid nodules.