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Biceps Femoris Muscle

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Jeffrey R. Stout – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Acute effects of static versus dynamic stretching on isometric peak torque, electromyography, and mechanomyography of the Biceps Femoris Muscle
    Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 2008
    Co-Authors: Trent J. Herda, Joel T. Cramer, Eric D. Ryan, Malachy P. Mchugh, Jeffrey R. Stout

    Abstract:

    The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of static versus dynamic stretching on peak torque (PT) and electromyographic (EMG), and mechanomyographic (MMG) amplitude of the Biceps Femoris Muscle (BF) during isometric maximal voluntary contractions of the leg flexors at four different knee joint angles. Fourteen men ((mean +/- SD) age, 25 +/- 4 years) performed two isometric leg flexion maximal voluntary contractions at knee joint angles of 41[degrees], 61[degrees], 81[degrees], and 101[degrees] below full leg extension. EMG ([mu]V) and MMG (m[middle dot]s-2) signals were recorded from the BF Muscle while PT values (Nm) were sampled from an isokinetic dynamometer. The right hamstrings were stretched with either static (stretching time, 9.2 +/- 0.4 minutes) or dynamic (9.1 +/- 0.3 minutes) stretching exercises. Four repetitions of three static stretching exercises were held for 30 seconds each, whereas four sets of three dynamic stretching exercises were performed (12-15 repetitions) with each set lasting 30 seconds. PT decreased after the static stretching at 81[degrees] (p = 0.019) and 101[degrees] (p = 0.001) but not at other angles. PT did not change (p > 0.05) after the dynamic stretching. EMG amplitude remained unchanged after the static stretching (p > 0.05) but increased after the dynamic stretching at 101[degrees] (p < 0.001) and 81[degrees] (p < 0.001). MMG amplitude increased in response to the static stretching at 101[degrees] (p = 0.003), whereas the dynamic stretching increased MMG amplitude at all joint angles (p

  • acute effects of static versus dynamic stretching on isometric peak torque electromyography and mechanomyography of the Biceps Femoris Muscle
    Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 2008
    Co-Authors: Trent J. Herda, Joel T. Cramer, Eric D. Ryan, Malachy P. Mchugh, Jeffrey R. Stout

    Abstract:

    The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of static versus dynamic stretching on peak torque (PT) and electromyographic (EMG), and mechanomyographic (MMG) amplitude of the Biceps Femoris Muscle (BF) during isometric maximal voluntary contractions of the leg flexors at four different knee joint angles. Fourteen men ((mean +/- SD) age, 25 +/- 4 years) performed two isometric leg flexion maximal voluntary contractions at knee joint angles of 41[degrees], 61[degrees], 81[degrees], and 101[degrees] below full leg extension. EMG ([mu]V) and MMG (m[middle dot]s-2) signals were recorded from the BF Muscle while PT values (Nm) were sampled from an isokinetic dynamometer. The right hamstrings were stretched with either static (stretching time, 9.2 +/- 0.4 minutes) or dynamic (9.1 +/- 0.3 minutes) stretching exercises. Four repetitions of three static stretching exercises were held for 30 seconds each, whereas four sets of three dynamic stretching exercises were performed (12-15 repetitions) with each set lasting 30 seconds. PT decreased after the static stretching at 81[degrees] (p = 0.019) and 101[degrees] (p = 0.001) but not at other angles. PT did not change (p > 0.05) after the dynamic stretching. EMG amplitude remained unchanged after the static stretching (p > 0.05) but increased after the dynamic stretching at 101[degrees] (p < 0.001) and 81[degrees] (p < 0.001). MMG amplitude increased in response to the static stretching at 101[degrees] (p = 0.003), whereas the dynamic stretching increased MMG amplitude at all joint angles (p <= 0.05). These results suggested that the decreases in strength after the static stretching may have been the result of mechanical rather than neural mechanisms for the BF Muscle. Overall, an acute bout of dynamic stretching may be less detrimental to Muscle strength than static stretching for the hamstrings.

Robert F Laprade – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Its Anatomy and Injury Patterns Associated with Acute Anterolateral-Anteromedial Rotatory Instability
    , 2010
    Co-Authors: Glenn C Terry, Robert F Laprade

    Abstract:

    We dissected 30 cadaveric knees to provide a detailed anatomic description of the Biceps Femoris Muscle complex at the knee. The main components of the long head of the Muscle are a reflected arm, a direct arm, an anterior arm, and a lateral and an anterior aponeurosis. The main components of the short head of the Biceps Femoris Muscle are a proximal attachment to the long head’s tendon, a capsular arm, a confluens of the Biceps and the capsuloosseous layer of the iliotibial tract, a direct arm, an anterior arm, and a lateral aponeurosis. We examined 82 consecutive, acutely injured knees with clinical signs of anterolateral-anteromedial rotatory instability for the incidence and anatomic location of injuries to the Biceps Femoris Muscle. Injuries to components of that Muscle were identified in 59 (72%) of these knees; 29 knees (35.4%) had multiple components injured. There were 3 injuries to the long head of the Biceps Femoris Muscle (all in the reflected arm) and 89 to the short head. A statistically

  • the Biceps Femoris Muscle complex at the knee its anatomy and injury patterns associated with acute anterolateral anteromedial rotatory instability
    American Journal of Sports Medicine, 1996
    Co-Authors: Glenn C Terry, Robert F Laprade

    Abstract:

    We dissected 30 cadaveric knees to provide a detailed anatomic description of the Biceps Femoris Muscle complex at the knee. The main components of the long head of the Muscle are a reflected arm, a direct arm, an anterior arm, and a lateral and an anterior aponeurosis. The main components of the short head of the Biceps Femoris Muscle are a proximal attachment to the long head’s tendon, a capsular arm, a confluens of the Biceps and the capsuloosseous layer of the iliotibial tract, a direct arm, an anterior arm, and a lateral apo neurosis. We examined 82 consecutive, acutely in jured knees with clinical signs of anterolateral-antero medial rotatory instability for the incidence and anatomic location of injuries to the Biceps Femoris mus cle. Injuries to components of that Muscle were iden tified in 59 (72%) of these knees; 29 knees (35.4%) had multiple components injured. There were 3 injuries to the long head of the Biceps Femoris Muscle (all in the reflected arm) and 89 to the short head. A statisticall…

Kiril Kiprovski – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • mri of the distal Biceps Femoris Muscle normal anatomy variants and association with common peroneal entrapment neuropathy
    American Journal of Roentgenology, 2007
    Co-Authors: Renata La Rocca Vieira, Zehava Sadka Rosenberg, Kiril Kiprovski

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE. The objectives of our study were to describe the previously unreported normal MR anatomy of the distal Biceps Femoris Muscle and its relationship with the common peroneal nerve and to present a case in which previously unreported MR evidence of an anatomic variation in the distal Biceps Femoris Muscle was associated with common peroneal entrapment neuropathy.MATERIALS AND METHODS. One hundred consecutive 1.5-T knee MR studies of 97 asymptomatic patients were retrospectively reviewed by two observers in consensus for, first, normal anatomy of the distal Biceps Femoris Muscle; second, anatomic variations of the Muscle; and, third, the relationship of the Muscle to the common peroneal nerve. Measurements of the distal and posterior extents of the short and long heads of the Biceps Femoris were performed. An MR study of a symptomatic patient with clinical evidence of common peroneal neuropathy associated with a surgically proven anatomic variation of the distal Biceps Femoris was reviewed.RESULTS. …