Binswangers Disease - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Binswangers Disease

The Experts below are selected from a list of 3 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Raymond Levy – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Binswanger on Binswanger’s Disease
    International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 1991
    Co-Authors: Hans Förstl, Robert Howard, Raymond Levy

    Abstract:

    In 1894 Otto Binswanger described a Disease of the hemispheric white matter which he called encephalitis subcorticalis chronica progressiva’. He examined eight patients who had shown a slow but relentless cognitive decay that began in middle or old age and lead to severe dementia, characterized in the early stages by a disturbance of association of cortical sensory and motor areas, by aphasia, hemiamblyopia, hemianopia, hemiparesis and a loss of the sense of pressure, position and touch. At postmortem the patients showed white matter atrophy most pronounced in the temporal and occipital lobes. Binswanger proposed that this subcortical fibre loss was due to cerebral arteriosclerosis, which was almost invariably demonstrated. “BinswangersDisease‘ has gained topical importance following the introduction of sensitive imaging techniques which have led to the frequent detection of white matter Disease during life. This full account of his original observations may contribute to the clarification of contemporary terminological issues.

Hans Förstl – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Binswanger on Binswanger’s Disease
    International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 1991
    Co-Authors: Hans Förstl, Robert Howard, Raymond Levy

    Abstract:

    In 1894 Otto Binswanger described a Disease of the hemispheric white matter which he called encephalitis subcorticalis chronica progressiva’. He examined eight patients who had shown a slow but relentless cognitive decay that began in middle or old age and lead to severe dementia, characterized in the early stages by a disturbance of association of cortical sensory and motor areas, by aphasia, hemiamblyopia, hemianopia, hemiparesis and a loss of the sense of pressure, position and touch. At postmortem the patients showed white matter atrophy most pronounced in the temporal and occipital lobes. Binswanger proposed that this subcortical fibre loss was due to cerebral arteriosclerosis, which was almost invariably demonstrated. “BinswangersDisease‘ has gained topical importance following the introduction of sensitive imaging techniques which have led to the frequent detection of white matter Disease during life. This full account of his original observations may contribute to the clarification of contemporary terminological issues.

Robert Howard – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Binswanger on Binswanger’s Disease
    International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 1991
    Co-Authors: Hans Förstl, Robert Howard, Raymond Levy

    Abstract:

    In 1894 Otto Binswanger described a Disease of the hemispheric white matter which he called encephalitis subcorticalis chronica progressiva’. He examined eight patients who had shown a slow but relentless cognitive decay that began in middle or old age and lead to severe dementia, characterized in the early stages by a disturbance of association of cortical sensory and motor areas, by aphasia, hemiamblyopia, hemianopia, hemiparesis and a loss of the sense of pressure, position and touch. At postmortem the patients showed white matter atrophy most pronounced in the temporal and occipital lobes. Binswanger proposed that this subcortical fibre loss was due to cerebral arteriosclerosis, which was almost invariably demonstrated. “BinswangersDisease‘ has gained topical importance following the introduction of sensitive imaging techniques which have led to the frequent detection of white matter Disease during life. This full account of his original observations may contribute to the clarification of contemporary terminological issues.