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Bioactive Drug

The Experts below are selected from a list of 159 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Jinquan Yu – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • pd 0 pr3 catalyzed intermolecular arylation of sp3 c h bonds
    Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2009
    Co-Authors: Masayuki Wasa, Keary M Engle, Jinquan Yu

    Abstract:

    Pd(0)-catalyzed intermolecular arylation of sp3 C−H bonds has been achieved using PR3/ArI. This protocol can be used to arylate a variety of aliphatic carboxylic acid derivatives, including a number of Bioactive Drug molecules. The use of fluorinated aryl iodides also allows for the introduction of fluorine into a molecule of interest.

  • Pd(0)/PR3-Catalyzed Intermolecular Arylation of sp3 C−H Bonds
    Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2009
    Co-Authors: Masayuki Wasa, Keary M Engle, Jinquan Yu

    Abstract:

    Pd(0)-catalyzed intermolecular arylation of sp3 C−H bonds has been achieved using PR3/ArI. This protocol can be used to arylate a variety of aliphatic carboxylic acid derivatives, including a number of Bioactive Drug molecules. The use of fluorinated aryl iodides also allows for the introduction of fluorine into a molecule of interest.

Amit K Goyal – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • advances in nanotechnology based carrier systems for targeted delivery of Bioactive Drug molecules with special emphasis on immunotherapy in Drug resistant tuberculosis a critical review
    Drug Delivery, 2016
    Co-Authors: Jagdeep Singh, Goutam Rath, Tarun Garg, Amit K Goyal

    Abstract:

    AbstractFrom the early sixteenth and seventeenth centuries to the present day of life, tuberculosis (TB) still is a global health threat with some new emergence of resistance. This type of emergence poses a vital challenge to control TB cases across the world. Mortality and morbidity rates are high due to this new face of TB. The newer nanotechnology-based Drug-delivery approaches involving micro-metric and nano-metric carriers are much needed at this stage. These delivery systems would provide more advantages over conventional systems of treatment by producing enhanced therapeutic efficacy, uniform distribution of Drug molecule to the target site, sustained and controlled release of Drug molecules and lesser side effects. The main aim to develop these novel Drug-delivery systems is to improve the patient compliance and reduce therapy time. This article reviews and elaborates the new concepts and Drug-delivery approaches for the treatment of TB involving solid-lipid particulate Drug-delivery systems (soli…

  • Current Nanotechnological Approaches for an Effective Delivery of Bioactive Drug Molecules to Overcome Drug Resistance Tuberculosis.
    Current Pharmaceutical Design, 2015
    Co-Authors: Tarun Garg, Goutam Rath, R. S. R. Murthy, Umesh Gupta, Palakkod G. Vatsala, Amit K Goyal

    Abstract:

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an airborne communicable disease, mainly caused by aerobic, non-motile, rodshaped,
    weakly gram-positive, acid-fast tubercular bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb). Mycobacterium
    has worsened the problem in humans by acquiring various types of resistances like Multi-Drug resistance (MDR),
    Single-Drug resistance (SDR), and Extensive Drug resistance (XDR). Some clinical problems and challenges associated
    with conventional TB chemotherapy include poor patient compliance, longer duration of chemotherapy,
    lesser cell permeability, primary Drug resistance, difficulty in maintaining higher Drug concentrations at the infected
    site, and degradation of the Drug before reaching the target site. Thus, newer micrometric or nanometric carriers
    Drug delivery approaches are needed. Colloidal (vesicular and particulate) Drug carriers offer numerous advantages
    over conventional therapy such as better systemic bioavailability, rapid onset of therapeutic action, avoidance of first-pass metabolism,
    providing sustained and controlled release, fewer dosing frequencies, desired pharmacokinetic prole and route of administration.
    This review article present updates and fabrication of Drug delivery approaches for tuberculosis chemotherapy in order to improve patient
    compliance.

  • current nanotechnological strategies for effective delivery of Bioactive Drug molecules in the treatment of tuberculosis
    Critical Reviews in Therapeutic Drug Carrier Systems, 2014
    Co-Authors: Mandeep Kaur, Tarun Garg, Goutam Rath, Amit K Goyal

    Abstract:

    Abstract Tuberculosis (TB) has gone from being a forgotten disease to a modern and recrudescent pathology from past decades. Some clinical problems and challenges associated with conventional TB chemotherapy include poor patient compliance, longer duration of chemotherapy, lesser cell permeability, primary Drug resistance, difficulty in maintaining higher Drug concentrations at the infected site, and degradation of the Drug before reaching the target site. Thus, newer Drug delivery approaches involving micrometric or nanometric carriers are needed. These delivery systems should provide advantages over conventional systems by producing optimum effectiveness to the target site, enhanced therapeutic efficacy, uniform distribution of the Drug throughout the target site, increased bioavailability and sustainability of the Drug, fewer side effects, and increased patient compliance. This article reviews recent updates and fabrication of Drug delivery approaches for tuberculosis chemotherapy involving vesicular Drug delivery systems (liposomes, niosomes, solid lipid nanoparticles), particulate Drug delivery systems (nanoparticles, microparticles, dendrimers), supramolecular Drug delivery systems (polymeric micelles), specialized Drug delivery systems (nanosuspensions, nanoemulsions, microemulsions, dry powders), complex conjugate Drug delivery systems (ISCOMs, cyclodextrin inclusion complexes), and other carrier-based Drug delivery systems in order to improve patient outcomes.

Masayuki Wasa – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • pd 0 pr3 catalyzed intermolecular arylation of sp3 c h bonds
    Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2009
    Co-Authors: Masayuki Wasa, Keary M Engle, Jinquan Yu

    Abstract:

    Pd(0)-catalyzed intermolecular arylation of sp3 C−H bonds has been achieved using PR3/ArI. This protocol can be used to arylate a variety of aliphatic carboxylic acid derivatives, including a number of Bioactive Drug molecules. The use of fluorinated aryl iodides also allows for the introduction of fluorine into a molecule of interest.

  • Pd(0)/PR3-Catalyzed Intermolecular Arylation of sp3 C−H Bonds
    Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2009
    Co-Authors: Masayuki Wasa, Keary M Engle, Jinquan Yu

    Abstract:

    Pd(0)-catalyzed intermolecular arylation of sp3 C−H bonds has been achieved using PR3/ArI. This protocol can be used to arylate a variety of aliphatic carboxylic acid derivatives, including a number of Bioactive Drug molecules. The use of fluorinated aryl iodides also allows for the introduction of fluorine into a molecule of interest.