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Biodegradable Synthetic Polymer

The Experts below are selected from a list of 126 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Yi Hong – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Current Advances in Biodegradable Synthetic Polymer based Cardiac Patches.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, 2020
    Co-Authors: Sara R Mcmahan, Alan Taylor, Katherine M Copeland, Jun Liao, Yi Hong

    Abstract:

    : The number of people affected by heart disease such as coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction increases at an alarming rate each year. Currently, the methods to treat these diseases are restricted to lifestyle change, pharmaceuticals, and eventually heart transplant if the condition is severe enough. While these treatment options are the standard for caring for patients who suffer from heart disease, limited regenerative ability of the heart restricts the effectiveness of treatment and may lead to other heart-related health problems in the future. Because of the increasing need for more effective therapeutic technologies for treating diseased heart tissue, cardiac patches are now a large focus for researchers. The cardiac patches are designed to be integrated into the patients’ natural tissue to introduce mechanical support and healing to the damaged areas. As a promising alternative, Synthetic Biodegradable Polymer based biomaterials can be easily manipulated to customize material properties, as well as possess certain desired characteristics for cardiac patch use. This comprehensive review summarizes recent works on Synthetic Biodegradable cardiac patches implanted into infarcted animal models. In addition, this review describes the basic requirements that should be met for cardiac patch development, and discusses the inspirations to designing new biomaterials and technologies for cardiac patches.

  • current advances in Biodegradable Synthetic Polymer based cardiac patches
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, 2020
    Co-Authors: Sara R Mcmahan, Alan Taylor, Katherine M Copeland, Jun Liao, Yi Hong

    Abstract:

    : The number of people affected by heart disease such as coronary artery disease (CAD) and myocardial infarction (MI) increases at an alarming rate each year. Currently, the methods to treat these diseases are restricted to lifestyle change, pharmaceuticals, and eventually heart transplant if the condition is severe enough. While these treatment options are the standard for caring for patients who suffer from heart disease, limited regenerative ability of the heart restricts the effectiveness of treatment and may lead to other heart-related health problems in the future. Because of the increasing need for more effective therapeutic technologies for treating diseased heart tissue, cardiac patches are now a large focus for researchers. The cardiac patches are designed to be integrated into patient’s natural tissue to introduce mechanical support and healing to the damaged areas. As a promising alternative, Synthetic Biodegradable Polymer based biomaterials can be easily manipulated to customize material properties, as well as possess certain desired characteristics for cardiac patch use. This comprehensive review summarizes recent works on Synthetic Biodegradable cardiac patches implanted into infarcted animal models. In addition, this review describes the basic requirements that should be met for cardiac patch development, and discusses the inspirations to designing new biomaterials and technologies for cardiac patches. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • mechanical properties and in vivo behavior of a Biodegradable Synthetic Polymer microfiber extracellular matrix hydrogel biohybrid scaffold
    Biomaterials, 2011
    Co-Authors: Yi Hong, Alexander Huber, Keisuke Takanari, Nicholas J. Amoroso, Ryotaro Hashizume, Stephen F Badylak, William R. Wagner

    Abstract:

    Abstract A biohybrid composite consisting of extracellular matrix (ECM) gel from porcine dermal tissue and Biodegradable elastomeric fibers was generated and evaluated for soft tissue applications. ECM gel possesses attractive biocompatibility and bioactivity with weak mechanical properties and rapid degradation, while electrospun Biodegradable poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU) has good mechanical properties but limited cellular infiltration and tissue integration. A concurrent gel electrospray/Polymer electrospinning method was employed to create ECM gel/PEUU fiber composites with attractive mechanical properties, including high flexibility and strength. Electron microscopy revealed a structure of interconnected fibrous layers embedded in ECM gel. Tensile mechanical properties could be tuned by altering the PEUU/ECM weight ratio. Scaffold tensile strengths for PEUU/ECM ratios of 67/33, 72/28 and 80/20 ranged from 80 to 187 kPa in the longitudinal axis (parallel to the collecting mandrel axis) and 41–91 kPa in the circumferential axis with 645–938% breaking strains. The 72/28 biohybrid composite and a control scaffold generated from electrospun PEUU alone were implanted into Lewis rats, replacing a full-thickness abdominal wall defect. At 4 wk, no infection or herniation was found at the implant site. Histological staining showed extensive cellular infiltration into the biohybrid scaffold with the newly developed tissue well integrated with the native periphery, while minimal cellular ingress into the electrospun PEUU scaffold was observed. Mechanical testing of explanted constructs showed evidence of substantial remodeling, with composite scaffolds adopting properties more comparable to the native abdominal wall. The described elastic biohybrid material imparts features of ECM gel bioactivity with PEUU strength and handling to provide a promising composite biomaterial for soft tissue repair and replacement.

Seeram Ramakrishna – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Degradation of electrospun nanofiber scaffold by short wave length ultraviolet radiation treatment and its potential applications in tissue engineering.
    Tissue Engineering Part A, 2008
    Co-Authors: Dong Yixiang, Thomas Yong, Susan Liao, Casey K. Chan, Seeram Ramakrishna

    Abstract:

    Development in the field of tissue engineering has brought much attention in the fabrication and preparation of scaffold with Biodegradable Synthetic Polymer nanofibers. Electrospun Biodegradable Polymeric nanofibers are increasingly being used to fabricate scaffolds for tissue engineering applications as they provide high surface area–to-volume ratio and possess high porosity. One common way to sterilize Polymeric nanofiber scaffolds is 254-nm ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. In this study, we aim to evaluate the effects of UV radiation on the degradation in Polymeric nanofibers, and then capitalize on UV-induced degradation and UV photolithography in Polymeric nanofiber scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. Poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA, 75:25) and poly(L-lactide-co-e-caprolactone) [P(LLA-CL), 70:30] nanofibrous meshes were produced by electrospinning. The nanofibers were irradiated by commercial germicide UV (λ = 254 nm) lamp for different intervals. We found that UV sterilization induc…

  • Degradation of Electrospun Nanofiber Scaffold by Short Wave Length Ultraviolet Radiation Treatment and Its Potential Applications in Tissue Engineering
    Tissue Engineering Part A, 2008
    Co-Authors: Dong Yixiang, Thomas Yong, Susan Liao, Casey K. Chan, Seeram Ramakrishna

    Abstract:

    Development in the field of tissue engineering has brought much attention in the fabrication and preparation of scaffold with Biodegradable Synthetic Polymer nanofibers. Electrospun Biodegradable Polymeric nanofibers are increasingly being used to fabricate scaffolds for tissue engineering applications as they provide high surface area-to-volume ratio and possess high porosity. One common way to sterilize Polymeric nanofiber scaffolds is 254-nm ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. In this study, we aim to evaluate the effects of UV radiation on the degradation in Polymeric nanofibers, and then capitalize on UV-induced degradation and UV photolithography in Polymeric nanofiber scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. Poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA, 75:25) and poly(L-lactide-co-epsilon-caprolactone) [P(LLA-CL), 70:30] nanofibrous meshes were produced by electrospinning. The nanofibers were irradiated by commercial germicide UV (lambda=254 nm) lamp for different intervals. We found that UV sterilization induced significant degradation of nanofiber. At 1 h UV irradiation, the average molecular weight of PLGA and P(LLA-CL) nanofibers were reduced by 46% and 35%, respectively, with corresponding reduction in the tensile strength of 26% for PLGA and 28% for P(LLA-CL). Hence, precautions may have to be taken into consideration when sterilizing Polymeric nanofibers by UV treatment. UV-induced degradation on nanofibers was applied to fabrication of a three-dimensional (3D) tissue engineering scaffold by UV photolithography. Masked exposure to UV could generate patterned holes (d=100 microm) on the nanofibrous mesh. Cell culture study showed that smooth muscle cells were able to migrate into the holes. This method can be used to fabricate a 3D nanofibrous scaffold with micropores.

Sara R Mcmahan – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Current Advances in Biodegradable Synthetic Polymer based Cardiac Patches.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, 2020
    Co-Authors: Sara R Mcmahan, Alan Taylor, Katherine M Copeland, Jun Liao, Yi Hong

    Abstract:

    : The number of people affected by heart disease such as coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction increases at an alarming rate each year. Currently, the methods to treat these diseases are restricted to lifestyle change, pharmaceuticals, and eventually heart transplant if the condition is severe enough. While these treatment options are the standard for caring for patients who suffer from heart disease, limited regenerative ability of the heart restricts the effectiveness of treatment and may lead to other heart-related health problems in the future. Because of the increasing need for more effective therapeutic technologies for treating diseased heart tissue, cardiac patches are now a large focus for researchers. The cardiac patches are designed to be integrated into the patients’ natural tissue to introduce mechanical support and healing to the damaged areas. As a promising alternative, Synthetic Biodegradable Polymer based biomaterials can be easily manipulated to customize material properties, as well as possess certain desired characteristics for cardiac patch use. This comprehensive review summarizes recent works on Synthetic Biodegradable cardiac patches implanted into infarcted animal models. In addition, this review describes the basic requirements that should be met for cardiac patch development, and discusses the inspirations to designing new biomaterials and technologies for cardiac patches.

  • current advances in Biodegradable Synthetic Polymer based cardiac patches
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, 2020
    Co-Authors: Sara R Mcmahan, Alan Taylor, Katherine M Copeland, Jun Liao, Yi Hong

    Abstract:

    : The number of people affected by heart disease such as coronary artery disease (CAD) and myocardial infarction (MI) increases at an alarming rate each year. Currently, the methods to treat these diseases are restricted to lifestyle change, pharmaceuticals, and eventually heart transplant if the condition is severe enough. While these treatment options are the standard for caring for patients who suffer from heart disease, limited regenerative ability of the heart restricts the effectiveness of treatment and may lead to other heart-related health problems in the future. Because of the increasing need for more effective therapeutic technologies for treating diseased heart tissue, cardiac patches are now a large focus for researchers. The cardiac patches are designed to be integrated into patient’s natural tissue to introduce mechanical support and healing to the damaged areas. As a promising alternative, Synthetic Biodegradable Polymer based biomaterials can be easily manipulated to customize material properties, as well as possess certain desired characteristics for cardiac patch use. This comprehensive review summarizes recent works on Synthetic Biodegradable cardiac patches implanted into infarcted animal models. In addition, this review describes the basic requirements that should be met for cardiac patch development, and discusses the inspirations to designing new biomaterials and technologies for cardiac patches. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.