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Biomarkers

The Experts below are selected from a list of 1096131 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

C. A. Lacueva – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Validation of Biomarkers of food intake¿critical assessment of candidate Biomarkers
    Genes and Nutrition, 2018
    Co-Authors: Laars Ove Dragsted, Augustin Scalbert, G. Vergeres, M. Kolehmainen, Claudine Manach, L. Brennan, L. A. Afman, D. S. Wishart, C. A. Lacueva

    Abstract:

    Biomarkers of food intake (BFIs) are a promising tool for limiting misclassification in nutrition research where more subjective dietary assessment instruments are used. They may also be used to assess compliance to dietary guidelines or to a dietary intervention. Biomarkers therefore hold promise for direct and objective measurement of food intake. However, the number of comprehensively validated Biomarkers of food intake is limited to just a few. Many new candidate Biomarkers emerge from metabolic profiling studies and from advances in food chemistry. Furthermore, candidate food intake Biomarkers may also be identified based on extensive literature reviews such as described in the guidelines for Biomarker of Food Intake Reviews (BFIRev). To systematically and critically assess the validity of candidate Biomarkers of food intake, it is necessary to outline and streamline an optimal and reproducible validation process. A consensus-based procedure was used to provide and evaluate a set of the most important criteria for systematic validation of BFIs. As a result, a validation procedure was developed including eight criteria, plausibility, dose-response, time-response, robustness, reliability, stability, analytical performance, and inter-laboratory reproducibility. The validation has a dual purpose: (1) to estimate the current level of validation of candidate Biomarkers of food intake based on an objective and systematic approach and (2) to pinpoint which additional studies are needed to provide full validation of each candidate biomarker of food intake. This position paper on biomarker of food intake validation outlines the second step of the BFIRev procedure but may also be used as such for validation of new candidate Biomarkers identified, e.g., in food metabolomic studies.

  • Validation of Biomarkers of food intake-critical assessment of candidate Biomarkers
    Genes and Nutrition, 2018
    Co-Authors: Laars Ove Dragsted, Q. Gao, Augustin Scalbert, G. Vergeres, M. Kolehmainen, Claudine Manach, L. Brennan, L. A. Afman, D. S. Wishart, C. A. Lacueva

    Abstract:

    Biomarkers of food intake (BFIs) are a promising tool for limiting misclassification in nutrition research where more subjective dietary assessment instruments are used. They may also be used to assess compliance to dietary guidelines or to a dietary intervention. Biomarkers therefore hold promise for direct and objective measurement of food intake. However, the number of comprehensively validated Biomarkers of food intake is limited to just a few. Many new candidate Biomarkers emerge from metabolic profiling studies and from advances in food chemistry. Furthermore, candidate food intake Biomarkers may also be identified based on extensive literature reviews such as described in the guidelines for Biomarker of Food Intake Reviews (BFIRev). To systematically and critically assess the validity of candidate Biomarkers of food intake, it is necessary to outline and streamline an optimal and reproducible validation process. A consensus-based procedure was used to provide and evaluate a set of the most important criteria for systematic validation of BFIs. As a result, a validation procedure was developed including eight criteria, plausibility, dose-response, time-response, robustness, reliability, stability, analytical performance, and inter-laboratory reproducibility. The validation has a dual purpose: (1) to estimate the current level of validation of candidate Biomarkers of food intake based on an objective and systematic approach and (2) to pinpoint which additional studies are needed to provide full validation of each candidate biomarker of food intake. This position paper on biomarker of food intake validation outlines the second step of the BFIRev procedure but may also be used as such for validation of new candidate Biomarkers identified, e.g., in food metabolomic studies.

Laars Ove Dragsted – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Validation of Biomarkers of food intake¿critical assessment of candidate Biomarkers
    Genes and Nutrition, 2018
    Co-Authors: Laars Ove Dragsted, Augustin Scalbert, G. Vergeres, M. Kolehmainen, Claudine Manach, L. Brennan, L. A. Afman, D. S. Wishart, C. A. Lacueva

    Abstract:

    Biomarkers of food intake (BFIs) are a promising tool for limiting misclassification in nutrition research where more subjective dietary assessment instruments are used. They may also be used to assess compliance to dietary guidelines or to a dietary intervention. Biomarkers therefore hold promise for direct and objective measurement of food intake. However, the number of comprehensively validated Biomarkers of food intake is limited to just a few. Many new candidate Biomarkers emerge from metabolic profiling studies and from advances in food chemistry. Furthermore, candidate food intake Biomarkers may also be identified based on extensive literature reviews such as described in the guidelines for Biomarker of Food Intake Reviews (BFIRev). To systematically and critically assess the validity of candidate Biomarkers of food intake, it is necessary to outline and streamline an optimal and reproducible validation process. A consensus-based procedure was used to provide and evaluate a set of the most important criteria for systematic validation of BFIs. As a result, a validation procedure was developed including eight criteria, plausibility, dose-response, time-response, robustness, reliability, stability, analytical performance, and inter-laboratory reproducibility. The validation has a dual purpose: (1) to estimate the current level of validation of candidate Biomarkers of food intake based on an objective and systematic approach and (2) to pinpoint which additional studies are needed to provide full validation of each candidate biomarker of food intake. This position paper on biomarker of food intake validation outlines the second step of the BFIRev procedure but may also be used as such for validation of new candidate Biomarkers identified, e.g., in food metabolomic studies.

  • Validation of Biomarkers of food intake-critical assessment of candidate Biomarkers
    Genes and Nutrition, 2018
    Co-Authors: Laars Ove Dragsted, Q. Gao, Augustin Scalbert, G. Vergeres, M. Kolehmainen, Claudine Manach, L. Brennan, L. A. Afman, D. S. Wishart, C. A. Lacueva

    Abstract:

    Biomarkers of food intake (BFIs) are a promising tool for limiting misclassification in nutrition research where more subjective dietary assessment instruments are used. They may also be used to assess compliance to dietary guidelines or to a dietary intervention. Biomarkers therefore hold promise for direct and objective measurement of food intake. However, the number of comprehensively validated Biomarkers of food intake is limited to just a few. Many new candidate Biomarkers emerge from metabolic profiling studies and from advances in food chemistry. Furthermore, candidate food intake Biomarkers may also be identified based on extensive literature reviews such as described in the guidelines for Biomarker of Food Intake Reviews (BFIRev). To systematically and critically assess the validity of candidate Biomarkers of food intake, it is necessary to outline and streamline an optimal and reproducible validation process. A consensus-based procedure was used to provide and evaluate a set of the most important criteria for systematic validation of BFIs. As a result, a validation procedure was developed including eight criteria, plausibility, dose-response, time-response, robustness, reliability, stability, analytical performance, and inter-laboratory reproducibility. The validation has a dual purpose: (1) to estimate the current level of validation of candidate Biomarkers of food intake based on an objective and systematic approach and (2) to pinpoint which additional studies are needed to provide full validation of each candidate biomarker of food intake. This position paper on biomarker of food intake validation outlines the second step of the BFIRev procedure but may also be used as such for validation of new candidate Biomarkers identified, e.g., in food metabolomic studies.

Rita F Redberg – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Charting a roadmap for heart failure biomarker studies
    JACC: Heart Failure, 2014
    Co-Authors: Tariq Ahmad, Mona Fiuzat, Michael J Pencina, Nancy L Geller, Faiez Zannad, John G F Cleland, James V. Snider, Stephan Blankenberg, Kirkwood F. Adams, Rita F Redberg

    Abstract:

    Heart failure is a syndrome with a pathophysiological basis that can be traced to dysfunction in several interconnected molecular pathways. Identification of Biomarkers of heart failure that allow measurement of the disease on a molecular level has resulted in enthusiasm for their use in prognostication and selection of appropriate therapies. However, despiteconsiderable amounts of information available on numerous Biomarkers, inconsistent research methodologies and lack of clinical correlations have made bench-to-bedside translations rare and left the literature with countless publications of varied quality. There is a need for a systematic and collaborative approach aimed at definitively studying the clinical benefits of novel Biomarkers. In this review, on the basis of input from academia, industry, and governmental agencies, we propose a systematized approach based on adherence to specific quality measures for studies looking to augment current prediction model or use Biomarkers to tailor therapeutics. We suggest that study quality, rather than results, should determine publication and propose a system for grading biomarker studies. We outline the need for collaboration between clinical investigators and statisticians to introduce more advanced statistical methodologies into the field of Biomarkers that would allow for data from a large number of variables to be distilled into clinically actionable information. Lastly, we propose the creation of a heart failure biomarker consortium that would allow for a comprehensive list of Biomarkers to be concomitantly analyzed in a pooled sample of randomized clinical trials and hypotheses to be generated for testing in biomarker-guided trials. Such a consortium could collaborate in sharing samples to identify Biomarkers, undertake meta-analyses on completed trials, and spearhead clinical trials to test the clinical utility of new Biomarkers.