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Biomass Productivity

The Experts below are selected from a list of 9954 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Lanlan Zhang – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • attached cultivation for improving the Biomass Productivity of spirulina platensis
    Bioresource Technology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Lanlan Zhang, Lin Chen, Junfeng Wang, Yu Chen, Zhaohui Zhang

    Abstract:

    To improve cultivation efficiency for microalgae Spirulina platensis is related to increase its potential use as food source and as an effective alternative for CO2 fixation. The present work attempted to establish a technique, namely attached cultivation, for S. platensis. Laboratory experiments were made firstly to investigate optimal conditions on attached cultivation. The optimal conditions were found: 25 g m (2) for initial inoculum density using electrostatic flocking cloth as substrata, light intensity lower than 200 mu mol m (2) s (1), CO2 enriched air flow (0.5%) at a superficial aeration rate of 0.0056 m s (1) in a NaHCO3-free Zarrouk medium. An outdoor attached cultivation bench-scale bioreactor was built and a 10 d culture of S. platensis was carried out with daily harvesting. A high footprint areal Biomass Productivity of 60 g m (2) d (1) was obtained. The nutrition of S. platensis with attached cultivation is identical to that with conventional liquid cultivation. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • Attached cultivation for improving the Biomass Productivity of Spirulina platensis
    Bioresource Technology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Lanlan Zhang, Lin Chen, Junfeng Wang, Yu Chen, Xin Gao, Zhaohui Zhang, Tianzhong Liu

    Abstract:

    To improve cultivation efficiency for microalgae Spirulina platensis is related to increase its potential use as food source and as an effective alternative for CO2fixation. The present work attempted to establish a technique, namely attached cultivation, for S. platensis. Laboratory experiments were made firstly to investigate optimal conditions on attached cultivation. The optimal conditions were found: 25gm-2for initial inoculum density using electrostatic flocking cloth as substrata, light intensity lower than 200μmolm-2s-1, CO2enriched air flow (0.5%) at a superficial aeration rate of 0.0056ms-1in a NaHCO3-free Zarrouk medium. An outdoor attached cultivation bench-scale bioreactor was built and a 10d culture of S. platensis was carried out with daily harvesting. A high footprint areal Biomass Productivity of 60gm-2d-1was obtained. The nutrition of S. platensis with attached cultivation is identical to that with conventional liquid cultivation.

Zhaohui Zhang – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • attached cultivation for improving the Biomass Productivity of spirulina platensis
    Bioresource Technology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Lanlan Zhang, Lin Chen, Junfeng Wang, Yu Chen, Zhaohui Zhang

    Abstract:

    To improve cultivation efficiency for microalgae Spirulina platensis is related to increase its potential use as food source and as an effective alternative for CO2 fixation. The present work attempted to establish a technique, namely attached cultivation, for S. platensis. Laboratory experiments were made firstly to investigate optimal conditions on attached cultivation. The optimal conditions were found: 25 g m (2) for initial inoculum density using electrostatic flocking cloth as substrata, light intensity lower than 200 mu mol m (2) s (1), CO2 enriched air flow (0.5%) at a superficial aeration rate of 0.0056 m s (1) in a NaHCO3-free Zarrouk medium. An outdoor attached cultivation bench-scale bioreactor was built and a 10 d culture of S. platensis was carried out with daily harvesting. A high footprint areal Biomass Productivity of 60 g m (2) d (1) was obtained. The nutrition of S. platensis with attached cultivation is identical to that with conventional liquid cultivation. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • Attached cultivation for improving the Biomass Productivity of Spirulina platensis
    Bioresource Technology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Lanlan Zhang, Lin Chen, Junfeng Wang, Yu Chen, Xin Gao, Zhaohui Zhang, Tianzhong Liu

    Abstract:

    To improve cultivation efficiency for microalgae Spirulina platensis is related to increase its potential use as food source and as an effective alternative for CO2fixation. The present work attempted to establish a technique, namely attached cultivation, for S. platensis. Laboratory experiments were made firstly to investigate optimal conditions on attached cultivation. The optimal conditions were found: 25gm-2for initial inoculum density using electrostatic flocking cloth as substrata, light intensity lower than 200μmolm-2s-1, CO2enriched air flow (0.5%) at a superficial aeration rate of 0.0056ms-1in a NaHCO3-free Zarrouk medium. An outdoor attached cultivation bench-scale bioreactor was built and a 10d culture of S. platensis was carried out with daily harvesting. A high footprint areal Biomass Productivity of 60gm-2d-1was obtained. The nutrition of S. platensis with attached cultivation is identical to that with conventional liquid cultivation.

Molina E Grima – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • outdoor helical tubular photobioreactors for microalgal production modeling of fluid dynamics and mass transfer and assessment of Biomass Productivity
    Biotechnology and Bioengineering, 2003
    Co-Authors: D O Hall, F Acien G Fernandez, Canizares E Guerrero, Molina E Grima

    Abstract:

    The production of the microalga Phaeodactylum tricornutum in an outdoor helical reactor was analyzed. First, fluid dynamics, mass-transfer capability, and mixing of the reactor was evaluated at different superficial gas velocities. Performance of the reactor was controlled by power input per culture volume. A maximum liquid velocity of 0.32 m s(-1) and mass transfer coefficient of 0.006 s(-1) were measured at 3200 W m(-3). A model of the influence of superficial gas velocity on the following reactor parameters was proposed: gas hold-up, induced liquid velocity, and mass transfer coefficient, with the accuracy of the model being demonstrated. Second, the influence of superficial gas velocity on the yield of the culture was evaluated in discontinuous and continuous cultures. Mean daily values of culture parameters, including dissolved oxygen, Biomass concentration, chlorophyll fluorescence (F(v)/F(m) ratio), growth rate, Biomass Productivity, and photosynthetic efficiency, were determined. Different growth curves were measured when the superficial gas velocity was modified-the higher the superficial gas velocity, the higher the yield of the system. In continuous mode, Biomass Productivity increased by 35%, from 1.02 to 1.38 g L(-1) d(-1), when the superficial gas velocity increased from 0.27 to 0.41 m s(-1). Maximal growth rates of 0.068 h(-1), Biomass productivities up to 1.4 g L(-1) d(-1), and photosynthetic efficiency of up to 15% were obtained at the higher superficial gas velocity of 0.41 m s(-1). The fluorescence parameter, F(v)/F(m), which reflects the maximal efficiency of PSII photochemistry, showed that the cultures were stressed at average irradiances within the culture higher than 280 microE m(-2) s(-1) at every superficial gas velocity. For nonstressed cultures, the yield of the system was a function of average irradiance inside the culture, with the superficial gas velocity determining this relationship. When superficial gas velocity was increased, higher growth rates, Biomass productivities, and photosynthetic efficiencies were obtained for similar average irradiance values. The higher the superficial gas velocity, the higher the liquid velocity, with this increase enhancing the movement of the cells inside the culture. In this way the efficiency of the cells increased and higher Biomass concentrations and productivities were reached for the same solar irradiance.

  • modeling of Biomass Productivity in tubular photobioreactors for microalgal cultures effects of dilution rate tube diameter and solar irradiance
    Biotechnology and Bioengineering, 1998
    Co-Authors: F Acien G Fernandez, Garcia F Camacho, J Sanchez A Perez, J Fernandez M Sevilla, Molina E Grima

    Abstract:

    A macromodel is developed for estimating the year-long Biomass Productivity of outdoor cultures of microalga in tubular photobioreactors. The model evaluates the solar irradiance on the culture surface as a function of day of the year and the geographic location. In a second step, the geometry of the system is taken into account in estimating the average irradiance to which the cells are exposed. Finally, the growth rate is estimated as a function of irradiance, taking into account photoinhibition and photolimitation. The model interconnects solar irradiance (an environmental variable), tube diameter (a design variable), and dilution rate (an operating variable). Continuous cultures in two different tubular photobioreactors were analyzed using the macromodel. The Biomass Productivity ranged from 0.50 to 2.04 g L−1 d−1, and from 1.08 to 2.76 g L−1 d−1, for the larger and the smaller tube diameter photobioreactors, respectively. The quantum yield ranged from 1.1 to 2.2 g E−1; the higher the incident solar radiation, the lower the quantum yield. Simultaneous photolimitation and photoinhibition of outdoor cultures was observed. The model reproduced the experimental results with less than 20% error. If photoinhibition was neglected, and a growth model that considered only photolimitation was used to fit the data, the error increased to 45%, thus reflecting the inadequacy of previous outdoor growth models that disregard photoinhibition. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 58: 605–616, 1998.