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Biopreservation

The Experts below are selected from a list of 2085 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

M. F. Pilet – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Selection of non-tyramine producing Carnobacterium strains for the Biopreservation of cold-smoked salmon
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Anne Brillet-viel, Sebastien Matamoros, Christine Blanchet-chevrollier, Francoise Leroi, Hervé Prévost, M. F. Pilet

    Abstract:

    Biogenic amines in fish products are the result of the decarboxylation of free amino-acids by microorganisms. In cold smoked salmon, tyramine is mainly produced by lactic acid bacteria of the genus Carnobacterium that are also interesting bacteria for the control of the risk of Listeria monocytogenes growth. In this study, we have screened a collection of Carnobacterium strains that could be used for Biopreservation in order to find a natural tyramine negative strain. This screening was performed using the detection by PCR test of a part of the tyrosine decarboxylase gene. On 35 strains of Carnobacterium tested, all showed the presence of the tdc gene suggesting that they all produce tyramine. This was assessed by the quantification of tyramine production for 10 strains. In a second part, a mutation procedure using ethyl methyl sulfonate was used to select a tyramine negative mutant of Carnobacterium divergens V41,that is a good candidate for Biopreservation applications. A mutant strain called C. divergens V41A8 was selected and characterized. The mutant was identical to the wild strain concerning carbohydrates fermentation profile, antibiogram spectrum, bacteriocin production, and bacteriocin spectrum towards Listeria monocytogenes. The growth of strain C. divergens V41A8 was tested by comparison to the wild strain on a sterile cold smoked salmon model. The mutant grew more slowly than the wild strain on the product but it reached nearly the same level after 28 days of storage. Moreover, the production of tyramine detected on cold smoked salmon inoculated with C. divergens V41 (122 µg/g after 28 days of storage) was not detected at all when the product was inoculated with the mutant strain C. divergens V41A8. This strain could be an interesting alternative for the application of biopreservative Carnobacterium on food products naturally contaminated with tyramine such as smoked fishes.

  • salmon gravlax Biopreservation with lactic acid bacteria a polyphasic approach to assessing the impact on organoleptic properties microbial ecosystem and volatilome composition
    Frontiers in Microbiology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Norman Wiernasz, Francoise Leroi, Mireille Cardinal, Josiane Cornet, Delphine Passerini, Frédérique Chevalier, Jens Rohloff, Sigurlaug Skίrnisdόttir, M. F. Pilet

    Abstract:

    Seafood and fishery products are very fragile commodities with short shelf-lives owing to rapid deterioration of their organoleptic and microbiological quality. Microbial growth and activity are responsible for up to 25% of food losses in the fishery industry. In this context and to meet consumer demand for minimally processed food, developing mild preservation technologies such as Biopreservation represents a major challenge. In this work, we studied the use of six lactic acid bacteria (LAB), previously selected for their properties as bioprotective agents, for salmon dill gravlax Biopreservation. Naturally contaminated salmon dill gravlax slices, with a commercial shelf-life of 21 days, were purchased from a French industrial company and inoculated by spraying with the protective cultures (PCs) to reach an initial concentration of 106 log CFU/g. PC impact on gravlax microbial ecosystem (cultural and acultural methods), sensory properties (sensory profiling test), biochemical parameters (pH, TMA, TVBN, biogenic amines) and volatilome was followed for 25 days of storage at 8° C in vacuum packaging. PC antimicrobial activity was also assessed in situ against Listeria monocytogenes. This polyphasic approach underlined two scenarios depending on the protective strain. Carnobacterium maltaromaticum SF1944, Lactococcus piscium EU2229 and Leuconostoc gelidum EU2249, were very competitive in the product, dominated the microbial ecosystem, and displayed antimicrobial activity against the spoilage microbiota and L. monocytogenes. The strains also expressed their own sensory and volatilome signatures. However, of these three strains, C. maltaromaticum SF1944 did not induce strong spoilage and was the most efficient for L. monocytogenes growth control. By contrast, Vagococcus fluvialis CD264, Carnobacterium inhibens MIP2551 and Aerococcus viridans SF1044 were not competitive, did not express strong antimicrobial activity and produced only few organic volatile compounds (VOCs). However, V. fluvialis CD264 was the only strain to extend the sensory quality, even beyond 25 days. This study shows that C. maltaromaticum SF1944 and V. fluvialis CD264 both have a promising potential as bioprotective cultures to ensure salmon gravlax microbial safety and sensorial quality, respectively.

  • Biopreservation, A new hurdle technology to improve safety and quality of seafood products
    6th International CIGR Technical Symposium – Towards a Sustainable Food Chain: Food Process, Bioprocessing and Food Quality Management, 2011
    Co-Authors: Anne Brillet-viel, M. F. Pilet, Xavier Dousset, Francois Le Chevalier, Mireille Cardinal, Josiane Cornet, J.J. Joffraud, Francoise Leroi

    Abstract:

    The Biopreservation technology consists in preventing growth of unwanted microorganisms in food by using added selected protective microflora. Three lactic acid bacteria strains selected for their inhibition properties and their ability to grow at low storage temperatures have been added in raw salmon fillets and cooked peeled shrimp packed under modified atmosphere, in comparison with a commercial bacterial strain. For each product, microbiological analyses and sensory evaluations were performed during the chilled storage to determine the effect of the protective flora to prevent the spoilage activities. Leuconostoc gelidum EU2247 and Lactococcus piscium EU2229 allowed to improve the sensory shelf-life of raw salmon and cooked shrimp respectively by comparison to the non-inoculated control, without any adverse effects suggesting that Biopreservation technology is promising for such applications.

Francoise Leroi – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Biopreservation of lightly preserved seafood products
    Infofish international, 2020
    Co-Authors: Francoise Leroi

    Abstract:

    Consumer trends indicate an increasing demand for natural, minimally processed convenience seafood with few additives. Biopreservation techniques developed by researchers in France to control Listeria monocytogenes and to extend shelf life of mildly preserved seafood have been commercialised.

  • Selection of non-tyramine producing Carnobacterium strains for the Biopreservation of cold-smoked salmon
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Anne Brillet-viel, Sebastien Matamoros, Christine Blanchet-chevrollier, Francoise Leroi, Hervé Prévost, M. F. Pilet

    Abstract:

    Biogenic amines in fish products are the result of the decarboxylation of free amino-acids by microorganisms. In cold smoked salmon, tyramine is mainly produced by lactic acid bacteria of the genus Carnobacterium that are also interesting bacteria for the control of the risk of Listeria monocytogenes growth. In this study, we have screened a collection of Carnobacterium strains that could be used for Biopreservation in order to find a natural tyramine negative strain. This screening was performed using the detection by PCR test of a part of the tyrosine decarboxylase gene. On 35 strains of Carnobacterium tested, all showed the presence of the tdc gene suggesting that they all produce tyramine. This was assessed by the quantification of tyramine production for 10 strains. In a second part, a mutation procedure using ethyl methyl sulfonate was used to select a tyramine negative mutant of Carnobacterium divergens V41,that is a good candidate for Biopreservation applications. A mutant strain called C. divergens V41A8 was selected and characterized. The mutant was identical to the wild strain concerning carbohydrates fermentation profile, antibiogram spectrum, bacteriocin production, and bacteriocin spectrum towards Listeria monocytogenes. The growth of strain C. divergens V41A8 was tested by comparison to the wild strain on a sterile cold smoked salmon model. The mutant grew more slowly than the wild strain on the product but it reached nearly the same level after 28 days of storage. Moreover, the production of tyramine detected on cold smoked salmon inoculated with C. divergens V41 (122 µg/g after 28 days of storage) was not detected at all when the product was inoculated with the mutant strain C. divergens V41A8. This strain could be an interesting alternative for the application of biopreservative Carnobacterium on food products naturally contaminated with tyramine such as smoked fishes.

  • salmon gravlax Biopreservation with lactic acid bacteria a polyphasic approach to assessing the impact on organoleptic properties microbial ecosystem and volatilome composition
    Frontiers in Microbiology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Norman Wiernasz, Francoise Leroi, Mireille Cardinal, Josiane Cornet, Delphine Passerini, Frédérique Chevalier, Jens Rohloff, Sigurlaug Skίrnisdόttir, M. F. Pilet

    Abstract:

    Seafood and fishery products are very fragile commodities with short shelf-lives owing to rapid deterioration of their organoleptic and microbiological quality. Microbial growth and activity are responsible for up to 25% of food losses in the fishery industry. In this context and to meet consumer demand for minimally processed food, developing mild preservation technologies such as Biopreservation represents a major challenge. In this work, we studied the use of six lactic acid bacteria (LAB), previously selected for their properties as bioprotective agents, for salmon dill gravlax Biopreservation. Naturally contaminated salmon dill gravlax slices, with a commercial shelf-life of 21 days, were purchased from a French industrial company and inoculated by spraying with the protective cultures (PCs) to reach an initial concentration of 106 log CFU/g. PC impact on gravlax microbial ecosystem (cultural and acultural methods), sensory properties (sensory profiling test), biochemical parameters (pH, TMA, TVBN, biogenic amines) and volatilome was followed for 25 days of storage at 8° C in vacuum packaging. PC antimicrobial activity was also assessed in situ against Listeria monocytogenes. This polyphasic approach underlined two scenarios depending on the protective strain. Carnobacterium maltaromaticum SF1944, Lactococcus piscium EU2229 and Leuconostoc gelidum EU2249, were very competitive in the product, dominated the microbial ecosystem, and displayed antimicrobial activity against the spoilage microbiota and L. monocytogenes. The strains also expressed their own sensory and volatilome signatures. However, of these three strains, C. maltaromaticum SF1944 did not induce strong spoilage and was the most efficient for L. monocytogenes growth control. By contrast, Vagococcus fluvialis CD264, Carnobacterium inhibens MIP2551 and Aerococcus viridans SF1044 were not competitive, did not express strong antimicrobial activity and produced only few organic volatile compounds (VOCs). However, V. fluvialis CD264 was the only strain to extend the sensory quality, even beyond 25 days. This study shows that C. maltaromaticum SF1944 and V. fluvialis CD264 both have a promising potential as bioprotective cultures to ensure salmon gravlax microbial safety and sensorial quality, respectively.

Sonia Garde – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • industrial scale application of lactobacillus reuteri coupled with glycerol as a Biopreservation system for inhibiting clostridium tyrobutyricum in semi hard ewe milk cheese
    Food Microbiology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Marta Ávila, David Delgado, Natalia Gomeztorres, Pilar Gaya, Sonia Garde

    Abstract:

    The suitability of the Biopreservation system formed by reuterin-producing L. reuteri INIA P572 and glycerol (required for reuterin production) to prevent late blowing defect (LBD) was evaluated in industrial sized semi-hard ewe milk cheese contaminated with Clostridium tyrobutyricum INIA 68, a wild strain isolated from a LBD cheese. For this purpose, six batches of cheese were made (three with and three without clostridial spores): control cheeses with lactococci starter, cheeses with L. reuteri as adjunct, and cheeses with L. reuteri and 30 mM glycerol. Spores of C. tyrobutyricum INIA 68 germinated during pressing of cheese curd, causing butyric acid fermentation in cheese after 30 d of ripening. The addition of L. reuteri, without glycerol, enhanced the symptoms and the formation of volatile compounds associated with LBD. When glycerol was added to cheese milk contaminated with C. tyrobutyricum, L. reuteri was able to produce reuterin in cheese resulting in cheeses with a uniform cheese matrix and a volatile profile similar to cheese made with L. reuteri and glycerol (without spores). Accordingly, L. reuteri INIA P572 coupled with glycerol seems a novel Biopreservation system to inhibit Clostridium growth and prevent LBD by means of in situ reuterin production.

  • Effect of reuterin-producing Lactobacillus reuteri coupled with glycerol on the volatile fraction, odour and aroma of semi-hard ewe milk cheese
    International Journal of Food Microbiology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Natalia Gómez-torres, Marta Ávila, David Delgado, Sonia Garde

    Abstract:

    The effect of the Biopreservation system formed by Lactobacillus reuteri INIA P572, a reuterin-producing strain, and glycerol (required for reuterin production), on the volatile fraction, aroma and odour of industrial sized semi-hard ewe milk cheese (Castellano type) was investigated over a 3-month ripening period. The volatile compounds were extracted and analyzed by SPME-GC-MS and cheese odour and aroma profiles were studied by descriptive sensory analysis. Control cheese was made only with a mesophilic starter and experimental cheeses with L. reuteri were made with and without glycerol. The addition of L. reuteri INIA P572 to milk enhanced the formation of six volatile compounds. Despite the changes in the volatile compounds profile, the use of L. reuteri INIA P572 did not noticeably affect the sensory characteristics of cheese. On the other hand, the addition of L. reuteri INIA P572 coupled with 30 mM glycerol enhanced the formation of twelve volatile compounds, but decreased the formation of five ones. The use of the Biopreservation system did not affect overall odour and aroma quality of cheese although it resulted in a significant decrease of the odour intensity scores. In addition, this cheese received significant higher scores for “cheesy” aroma and significant lower scores for the aroma attributes “milky”, “caramel” and “yogurt-like”. The first two axes of a principal component analysis (PCA) performed for selected volatile compounds and sensory characteristics, accounting for 75% of the variability between cheeses, separated cheeses made with L. reuteri INIA P572 and glycerol from the rest of cheeses, and also differentiated control cheese from cheeses made with L. reuteri INIA P572 from day 60 onward. Our results showed that the reuterin-producing L. reuteri INIA P572 strain, when coupled with glycerol, may be a suitable Biopreservation system to use in cheese without affecting odour and aroma quality.