Bismuth Salicylate - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Bismuth Salicylate

The Experts below are selected from a list of 102 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Herbert L. Dupont – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Travellers’ Diarrhoea
    Drugs, 1993
    Co-Authors: Herbert L. Dupont

    Abstract:

    For those who venture from highly industrialised areas to developing tropical and semitropical areas, the chance of developing diarrhoea is about 40%. In most cases a bacterial pathogen is responsible for the illness. The antimicrobial agents with the greatest activity against these organisms are cotrimoxazole (trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole) during the summer months in the interior of Mexico (a region where this agent has been studied extensively), and the fluoroquinolones for other places or other times, until data become available to indicate the appropriateness of cotrimoxazole here as well. Persons at risk should take along with them a drug to treat symptoms of travellers’ diarrhoea, and an appropriate antimicrobial agent. At the passage of the third unformed stool, it is recommended that travellers treat themselves with fluids and salt (flavoured mineral water augmented with saltine crackers is sufficient in most cases), symptomatic treatment and antibacterial therapy. Of these, the antimicrobial is the most important component, which is given either as a single large dose or once or twice daily for 3 days. Perhaps optimal therapy for afebrile nondysenteric patients is loperamide in combination with the antibacterial drug. In the face of fever or dysentery, the antimicrobial should be used alone. In special situations where food and beverage restrictions cannot be followed and where the itinerary cannot tolerate even the slightest alterations because of illness, chemoprophylaxis can be considered. The most effective preventive medication in this case is the antimicrobial also used for therapy, taken in half the therapeutic dosage daily while in the area of risk. However, the majority of travellers should not use this approach. Bismuth Salicylate (where available) can be taken safely to prevent illness.

  • Travellers’ diarrhoea. Which antimicrobial?
    Drugs, 1993
    Co-Authors: Herbert L. Dupont

    Abstract:

    Summary
    For those who venture from highly industrialised areas to developing tropical and semitropical areas, the chance of developing diarrhoea is about 40%. In most cases a bacterial pathogen is responsible for the illness. The antimicrobial agents with the greatest activity against these organisms are cotrimoxazole (trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole) during the summer months in the interior of Mexico (a region where this agent has been studied extensively), and the fluoroquinolones for other places or other times, until data become available to indicate the appropriateness of cotrimoxazole here as well. Persons at risk should take along with them a drug to treat symptoms of travellers’ diarrhoea, and an appropriate antimicrobial agent.
    At the passage of the third unformed stool, it is recommended that travellers treat themselves with fluids and salt (flavoured mineral water augmented with saltine crackers is sufficient in most cases), symptomatic treatment and antibacterial therapy. Of these, the antimicrobial is the most important component, which is given either as a single large dose or once or twice daily for 3 days. Perhaps optimal therapy for afebrile nondysenteric patients is loperamide in combination with the antibacterial drug. In the face of fever or dysentery, the antimicrobial should be used alone.
    In special situations where food and beverage restrictions cannot be followed and where the itinerary cannot tolerate even the slightest alterations because of illness, chemoprophylaxis can be considered. The most effective preventive medication in this case is the antimicrobial also used for therapy, taken in half the therapeutic dosage daily while in the area of risk. However, the majority of travellers should not use this approach. Bismuth Salicylate (where available) can be taken safely to prevent illness.

R E Pounder – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • the absorption of Bismuth and Salicylate from oral doses of pepto bismol Bismuth Salicylate
    Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 2007
    Co-Authors: C U Nwokolo, P Mistry, R E Pounder

    Abstract:

    SUMMARY
    Plasma Bismuth and plasma Salicylate concentrations were measured before and after three 30-ml oral doses of Bismuth Salicylate (Pepto-Bismol liquid) in 10 fasting healthy subjects. From 0 to 120 min following the first dose of Bismuth Salicylate, the plasma Bismuth concentration was less than 1 ng/ml. The peak median plasma Bismuth concentration was at + 240 min (1.7 ng/ml; range 0.8–5.3 ng/ml). Salicylate appeared in the plasma of all subjects at + 30 min, and it reached a peak at + 120 min (median 61 mg/L; range 46–104 mg/L).

    The study demonstrates that, despite rapid and substantial absorption of Salicylate, there is negligible absorption of Bismuth into the bloodstream from standard oral doses of Bismuth Salicylate.

C U Nwokolo – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Transmucosal penetration of Bismuth particles in the human stomach
    Gastroenterology, 2016
    Co-Authors: C U Nwokolo, J Lewin, M. Hudson, Roy E. Pounder

    Abstract:

    Abstract Electron microscopic examination of upper gastrointestinal biopsies with x-ray microanalysis was used to detect electron-dense particles of Bismuth in the mucosa of the upper gastrointestinal tract, 30–60 minutes after oral dosing with either tripotassium dicitrato Bismuthate [De-Noltab; Brocades (Great Britain) Ltd., Weybridge, UK; five patients] or Bismuth Salicylate (Pepto-Bismol; Richardson Vicks Ltd., Egham, UK; five patients), or without dosing (two patients). Transmucosal penetration of Bismuth particles was observed in the gastric antral mucosa of all patients who had been dosed with tripotassium dicitrato Bismuthate, but there was no penetration after oral dosing with Bismuth Salicylate. Persorption of Bismuth particles through the gastric mucosa to the vascular endothelium provides an explanation for the rapid rise of plasma Bismuth concentration observed only after oral dosing with tripotassium dicitrato Bismuthate.

  • the absorption of Bismuth and Salicylate from oral doses of pepto bismol Bismuth Salicylate
    Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 2007
    Co-Authors: C U Nwokolo, P Mistry, R E Pounder

    Abstract:

    SUMMARY
    Plasma Bismuth and plasma Salicylate concentrations were measured before and after three 30-ml oral doses of Bismuth Salicylate (Pepto-Bismol liquid) in 10 fasting healthy subjects. From 0 to 120 min following the first dose of Bismuth Salicylate, the plasma Bismuth concentration was less than 1 ng/ml. The peak median plasma Bismuth concentration was at + 240 min (1.7 ng/ml; range 0.8–5.3 ng/ml). Salicylate appeared in the plasma of all subjects at + 30 min, and it reached a peak at + 120 min (median 61 mg/L; range 46–104 mg/L).

    The study demonstrates that, despite rapid and substantial absorption of Salicylate, there is negligible absorption of Bismuth into the bloodstream from standard oral doses of Bismuth Salicylate.

  • The effect of histamine H2-receptor blockade on Bismuth absorption from three ulcer-healing compounds
    Gastroenterology, 1991
    Co-Authors: C U Nwokolo, M. Hudson, E. J. Prewett, A. M. Sawyerr, Roy E. Pounder

    Abstract:

    Abstract Twelve healthy male subjects were dosed with six regimens: ranitidine and De-Noltab (tripotassium dicitrato Bismuthate; Gist-Brocades Ltd., Weybridge, England), placebo and De-Noltab, ranitidine and Pepto-Bismol liquid [Bismuth Salicylate; Procter & Gamble (Health and Beauty Care) Ltd., Egham, England], placebo and Pepto-Bismol, ranitidine and Roter tablets (Bismuth subnitrate; Roter Pharma Ltd., Ashford, England), and placebo and Roter. Ranitidine, 300 mg, or placebo was administered at 10 pm (night before) and at 7 am; at 9 am, the oral dose of Bismuth was either 2 De-Noltabs, 3 30-mL doses of Pepto-Bismol liquid, or 2 Roter tablets. When predosed with placebo, the median integrated 8-hour plasma Bismuth concentration was significantly greater after dosing with De-Noltabs than after dosing with either Pepto-Bismol or Roter (61, 8, and 8 ng · h/mL, respectively), with a similar trend for 8-hour median urinary Bismuth excretion (213, 40, and 6 μg, respectively). When predosed with ranitidine, only after De-Noltab administration were there significant increases in the 8-hour plasma Bismuth concentration (147 ng · h/mL), and 8-hour urinary Bismuth excretion (686 μg). Eliminating intragastric acidity may enhance Bismuth absorption after oral dosing with De-Noltabs by maintaining intragastric tripotassium dicitrato Bismuthate as a colloidal suspension.