Blast Wall - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Blast Wall

The Experts below are selected from a list of 69 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

G K Schleye – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • inelastic deformation and failure of profiled stainless steel Blast Wall panels part i experimental investigations
    International Journal of Impact Engineering, 2005
    Co-Authors: G S Langdo, G K Schleye

    Abstract:

    This three-part article presents the results of experimental, analytical and numerical studies on the response of scale stainless steel Blast Wall panels and connection systems. The panel design was based on a deep trough trapezoidal profile with welded angle connections top and bottom and free sides. The loading applied to the panel was a triangular pulse pressure representative of a gas explosion overpressure. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of the connection detail on the overall performance of the panel/connection system under pulse pressure loading and to develop appropriate analytical and numerical models for correlation with the test results. Part I reports on the experimental investigations, whilst the analytical modelling considerations are examined in Part II. Finite element analysis, with ABAQUS, was used to simulate the Blast Wall panel behaviour and is discussed in Part III. Large permanent plastic deformations were produced in the panels without rupture, and localised buckling developed at the centre of the corrugations. The work highlights the importance of correctly modelling the support details and the variation in strength with Blast direction (the Blast Wall panels being stronger in the design direction). The modelling approaches predict a design capacity that is 39% higher than the current design guidance predicts, as a result of modelling the supports and including membrane action.

  • inelastic deformation and failure of profiled stainless steel Blast Wall panels part ii analytical modelling considerations
    International Journal of Impact Engineering, 2005
    Co-Authors: G S Langdo, G K Schleye

    Abstract:

    This three-part article presents the results of experimental, analytical and numerical studies on the response of 1/4 scale stainless steel Blast Wall panels and connection systems. The panel design was based on a deep trough trapezoidal profile with welded angle connections top and bottom and free sides. The loading applied to the panel was a triangular pulse pressure representative of a gas explosion overpressure. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of the connection detail on the overall performance of the panel/connection system under pulse pressure loading and to develop appropriate analytical and numerical models for correlation with the test results. Part I reports on the experimental investigations, whilst the analytical modelling considerations are examined in Part II. Finite element analysis, with ABAQUS, was used to simulate the Blast Wall panel behaviour and is discussed in Part III. Large permanent plastic deformations were produced in the panels without rupture, and localised buckling developed at the centre of the corrugations. The work highlights the importance of correctly modelling the support details and the variation in strength with Blast direction (the Blast Wall panels being stronger in the design direction). The modelling approaches predict a design capacity that is 39% higher than the current design guidance predicts, as a result of modelling the supports and including membrane action.

G K Schleyer – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • experimental investigation of Blast Wall panels under shock pressure loading
    International Journal of Impact Engineering, 2007
    Co-Authors: G K Schleyer, M J Lowak, M A Polcyn, G S Langdon

    Abstract:

    Abstract A series of field tests was carried out at the BakerRisk test site in San Antonio, Texas on 1 4 -scale stainless-steel Blast panels. The panel design was based on a deep trough trapezoidal profile, with welded angle connections at the top and bottom and free sides. The loading applied to the test panel was a shocked pressure pulse representative of the positive phase of the air Blast loading arising from a high-explosive charge. The aim of this work was (1) to show the effect of panel response on the reflected Blast loading and (2) to investigate the influence of the connection detail on the overall performance of the panel/connection system under shocked pressure loading. The data were also used to develop appropriate analytical and numerical models for correlation with the test results. Large permanent plastic deformations were produced in the panel without rupture. The work has shown that the connection detail can significantly influence the response and Blast resistance of the panel to extreme pressure loading. The results highlight the conservative nature of the design guidance for Blast Wall design, which limits the deflections to 1 40 th of the height of the Blast Wall. This in turn should lead to more economical design. The results also concluded that further test work was required to confirm that the panel response had any appreciable effect on the pressure loading.

  • deformation and failure of profiled stainless steel Blast Wall panels part iii finite element simulations and overall summary
    International Journal of Impact Engineering, 2006
    Co-Authors: G S Langdon, G K Schleyer

    Abstract:

    Abstract This three-part article presents the results of experimental, analytical and numerical studies on the response of 1 4 scale stainless steel Blast Wall panels and connection systems. The panel design was based on a deep trough trapezoidal profile with welded angle connections top and bottom and free sides. The loading applied to the panel was a triangular pulse pressure representative of a gas explosion overpressure. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of the connection detail on the overall performance of the panel/connection system under pulse pressure loading and to develop appropriate analytical and numerical models for correlation with the test results. Part I reported on the experimental investigations, whilst the analytical modelling considerations were examined in Part II. Finite element analysis, with ABAQUS, was used to simulate the Blast Wall panel behaviour and is discussed in Part III. Large permanent plastic deformations were produced in the panels without rupture, and localised buckling developed at the centre of the corrugations. The work highlights the importance of correctly modelling the support details and the variation in strength with Blast direction (the Blast Wall panels being stronger in the design direction). The modelling approaches predict a design capacity that is 39% higher than the current design guidance predicts, as a result of modelling the supports and including membrane action.

G S Langdo – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • inelastic deformation and failure of profiled stainless steel Blast Wall panels part i experimental investigations
    International Journal of Impact Engineering, 2005
    Co-Authors: G S Langdo, G K Schleye

    Abstract:

    This three-part article presents the results of experimental, analytical and numerical studies on the response of scale stainless steel Blast Wall panels and connection systems. The panel design was based on a deep trough trapezoidal profile with welded angle connections top and bottom and free sides. The loading applied to the panel was a triangular pulse pressure representative of a gas explosion overpressure. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of the connection detail on the overall performance of the panel/connection system under pulse pressure loading and to develop appropriate analytical and numerical models for correlation with the test results. Part I reports on the experimental investigations, whilst the analytical modelling considerations are examined in Part II. Finite element analysis, with ABAQUS, was used to simulate the Blast Wall panel behaviour and is discussed in Part III. Large permanent plastic deformations were produced in the panels without rupture, and localised buckling developed at the centre of the corrugations. The work highlights the importance of correctly modelling the support details and the variation in strength with Blast direction (the Blast Wall panels being stronger in the design direction). The modelling approaches predict a design capacity that is 39% higher than the current design guidance predicts, as a result of modelling the supports and including membrane action.

  • inelastic deformation and failure of profiled stainless steel Blast Wall panels part ii analytical modelling considerations
    International Journal of Impact Engineering, 2005
    Co-Authors: G S Langdo, G K Schleye

    Abstract:

    This three-part article presents the results of experimental, analytical and numerical studies on the response of 1/4 scale stainless steel Blast Wall panels and connection systems. The panel design was based on a deep trough trapezoidal profile with welded angle connections top and bottom and free sides. The loading applied to the panel was a triangular pulse pressure representative of a gas explosion overpressure. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of the connection detail on the overall performance of the panel/connection system under pulse pressure loading and to develop appropriate analytical and numerical models for correlation with the test results. Part I reports on the experimental investigations, whilst the analytical modelling considerations are examined in Part II. Finite element analysis, with ABAQUS, was used to simulate the Blast Wall panel behaviour and is discussed in Part III. Large permanent plastic deformations were produced in the panels without rupture, and localised buckling developed at the centre of the corrugations. The work highlights the importance of correctly modelling the support details and the variation in strength with Blast direction (the Blast Wall panels being stronger in the design direction). The modelling approaches predict a design capacity that is 39% higher than the current design guidance predicts, as a result of modelling the supports and including membrane action.