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Block Cipher

The Experts below are selected from a list of 19113 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Takanori Isobe – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • A single-key attack on the full GOST Block Cipher
    Journal of Cryptology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Takanori Isobe

    Abstract:

    The GOST Block Cipher is the Russian encryption standard published in 1989. In spite of considerable cryptanalytic efforts over the past 20 years, a key recovery attack on the full GOST Block Cipher with-out any key conditions (e.g., weak keys and related keys) has not been published yet. In this paper, we show a first single-key attack, which works for all key classes, on the full GOST Block Cipher. To construct the attack, we develop a new attack framework called Reflection-Meet-in-the-Middle Attack. This approach combines techniques of the reflection attack and the meet-in-the-middle attack. We apply it to the GOST Block Cipher with further novel techniques which are the effective MITM techniques using equivalent keys on short rounds. As a result, a key can be recovered with 2 225 computations and 2 32 known plaintexts.

  • a single key attack on the full gost Block Cipher
    Journal of Cryptology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Takanori Isobe

    Abstract:

    The GOST Block Cipher is the Russian encryption standard published in 1989. In spite of considerable cryptanalytic efforts over the past 20 years, a key recovery attack on the full GOST Block Cipher without any key conditions (e.g., weak keys and related keys) has not been published yet. In this paper, we show the first single-key attack, which works for all key classes, on the full GOST Block Cipher. To begin, we develop a new attack framework called Reflection-Meet-in-the-Middle Attack. This approach combines techniques of the reflection attack and the meet-in-the-middle (MITM) attack. Then we apply it to the GOST Block Cipher employing bijective S-boxes. In order to construct the full-round attack, we use additional novel techniques which are the effective MITM techniques using equivalent keys on a small number of rounds. As a result, a key can be recovered with a time complexity of 2225 encryptions and 232 known plaintexts. Moreover, we show that our attack is applicable to the full GOST Block Cipher using any S-boxes, including non-bijective S-boxes.

Matthew J.b. Robshaw – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • CHES – The LED Block Cipher
    Cryptographic Hardware and Embedded Systems – CHES 2011, 2011
    Co-Authors: Thomas Peyrin, Axel Poschmann, Matthew J.b. Robshaw

    Abstract:

    We present a new Block Cipher LED. While dedicated to compact hardware implementation, and offering the smallest silicon footprint among comparable Block Ciphers, the Cipher has been designed to simultaneously tackle three additional goals. First, we explore the role of an ultra-light (in fact non-existent) key schedule. Second, we consider the resistance of Ciphers, and LED in particular, to related-key attacks: we are able to derive simple yet interesting AES-like security proofs for LED regarding related- or single-key attacks. And third, while we provide a Block Cipher that is very compact in hardware, we aim to maintain a reasonable performance profile for software implementation.

  • The LED Block Cipher
    Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), 2011
    Co-Authors: Jian Guo, Thomas Peyrin, Axel Poschmann, Matthew J.b. Robshaw

    Abstract:

    We present a new Block Cipher LED . While dedicated to compact hardware implementation, and offering the smallest silicon footprint among comparable Block Ciphers, the Cipher has been designed to simultaneously tackle three additional goals. First, we explore the role of an ultra-light (in fact non-existent) key schedule. Second, we consider the resistance of Ciphers, and LED in particular, to related-key attacks: we are able to derive simple yet interesting AES -like security proofs for LED regarding related- or single-key attacks. And third, while we provide a Block Cipher that is very compact in hardware, we aim to maintain a reasonable performance profile for software implementation.

  • present an ultra lightweight Block Cipher
    Cryptographic Hardware and Embedded Systems, 2007
    Co-Authors: Andrey Bogdanov, Matthew J.b. Robshaw, Axel Poschmann, Lars R Knudsen, Gregor Leander, Christof Paar, Yannick Seurin, C Vikkelsoe

    Abstract:

    With the establishment of the AES the need for new Block Ciphers has been greatly diminished; for almost all Block Cipher applications the AES is an excellent and preferred choice. However, despite recent implementation advances, the AES is not suitable for extremely constrained environments such as RFID tags and sensor networks. In this paper we describe an ultra-lightweight Block Cipher, present . Both security and hardware efficiency have been equally important during the design of the Cipher and at 1570 GE, the hardware requirements for present are competitive with today’s leading compact stream Ciphers.

Axel Poschmann – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • CHES – The LED Block Cipher
    Cryptographic Hardware and Embedded Systems – CHES 2011, 2011
    Co-Authors: Thomas Peyrin, Axel Poschmann, Matthew J.b. Robshaw

    Abstract:

    We present a new Block Cipher LED. While dedicated to compact hardware implementation, and offering the smallest silicon footprint among comparable Block Ciphers, the Cipher has been designed to simultaneously tackle three additional goals. First, we explore the role of an ultra-light (in fact non-existent) key schedule. Second, we consider the resistance of Ciphers, and LED in particular, to related-key attacks: we are able to derive simple yet interesting AES-like security proofs for LED regarding related- or single-key attacks. And third, while we provide a Block Cipher that is very compact in hardware, we aim to maintain a reasonable performance profile for software implementation.

  • The LED Block Cipher
    Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), 2011
    Co-Authors: Jian Guo, Thomas Peyrin, Axel Poschmann, Matthew J.b. Robshaw

    Abstract:

    We present a new Block Cipher LED . While dedicated to compact hardware implementation, and offering the smallest silicon footprint among comparable Block Ciphers, the Cipher has been designed to simultaneously tackle three additional goals. First, we explore the role of an ultra-light (in fact non-existent) key schedule. Second, we consider the resistance of Ciphers, and LED in particular, to related-key attacks: we are able to derive simple yet interesting AES -like security proofs for LED regarding related- or single-key attacks. And third, while we provide a Block Cipher that is very compact in hardware, we aim to maintain a reasonable performance profile for software implementation.

  • present an ultra lightweight Block Cipher
    Cryptographic Hardware and Embedded Systems, 2007
    Co-Authors: Andrey Bogdanov, Matthew J.b. Robshaw, Axel Poschmann, Lars R Knudsen, Gregor Leander, Christof Paar, Yannick Seurin, C Vikkelsoe

    Abstract:

    With the establishment of the AES the need for new Block Ciphers has been greatly diminished; for almost all Block Cipher applications the AES is an excellent and preferred choice. However, despite recent implementation advances, the AES is not suitable for extremely constrained environments such as RFID tags and sensor networks. In this paper we describe an ultra-lightweight Block Cipher, present . Both security and hardware efficiency have been equally important during the design of the Cipher and at 1570 GE, the hardware requirements for present are competitive with today’s leading compact stream Ciphers.