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Block Definition Diagram

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Hassan Mountassir – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • FACS – Incremental Modeling of System Architecture Satisfying SysML Functional Requirements
    Formal Aspects of Component Software, 2014
    Co-Authors: Oscar Carrillo, Samir Chouali, Hassan Mountassir

    Abstract:

    The aim of this work is to propose a methodological approach to model and verify Component-Based Systems (CBS), directly from SysML requirement Diagrams, and to ensure formally the architecture consistency of the specified systems. The architecture consistency is guaranteed, when the components that interact in CBS are compatible and all component requirements are preserved by the composition. We propose to exploit functional requirements of CBS, specified with SysML Diagrams, and the composition of components to specify incrementally system architecture. Component interfaces are specified with SysML sequence Diagrams to capture their behaviors (protocols). From a requirement Diagram, we associate atomic requirements, represented as LTL properties, to reusable components satisfying them. LTL properties are verified on the components with SPIN model-checker. Then, we specify system architecture incrementally, with SysML Block Definition Diagram (BDD) and Internal Block Diagram (IBD), by treating, one by one the atomic requirements.

  • ECSA – Specifying system architecture from SysML requirements and component interfaces
    Software Architecture, 2013
    Co-Authors: Samir Chouali, Oscar Carrillo, Hassan Mountassir

    Abstract:

    We propose to map functional system requirements, specified with SysML, directly into system architecture, by exploiting the composition relation between component interfaces. Our research challenge is to guarantee formally that the final system fulfill the set of all requirements. Our approach is based on component-based systems (CBS) specified with SysML models and Interface Automata (IA) to capture their behaviors. From a SysML Requirement Diagram (RD), we build a Block Definition Diagram (BDD) to specify system architecture, by taking, one by one, the lowest level of requirements. At each new added requirement, we add a new component satisfying this requirement, by the composition, in the partial architecture obtained in a precedent step. Then we verify whether the new component is compatible with the components in the partial architecture, and if the requirements are preserved.

  • Assembling Components using SysML with Non-Functional Requirements
    , 2013
    Co-Authors: Samir Chouali, Ahmed Hammad, Hassan Mountassir

    Abstract:

    Non-functional requirements of component based systems are important as their functional requirements, therefore they must be considered in components assembly. These properties are beforehand specified with SysML requirement Diagram. We specify component based system architecture with SysML Block Definition Diagram, and component behaviors with sequence Diagrams. We propose to specify formally component interfaces with interface automata, obtained from requirement and sequence Diagrams. In this formalism, transitions are annotated with costs to specify non-functional property. The compatibility between components is performed by synchronizing their interface automata. The approach is explained with the example of the electric car CyCab, where the costs are associated to energy consumption of component actions. Our approach verifies whether, a set of components, when composed according to the system architecture, achieve their tasks by respecting their non-functional requirements.

Samir Chouali – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • FACS – Incremental Modeling of System Architecture Satisfying SysML Functional Requirements
    Formal Aspects of Component Software, 2014
    Co-Authors: Oscar Carrillo, Samir Chouali, Hassan Mountassir

    Abstract:

    The aim of this work is to propose a methodological approach to model and verify Component-Based Systems (CBS), directly from SysML requirement Diagrams, and to ensure formally the architecture consistency of the specified systems. The architecture consistency is guaranteed, when the components that interact in CBS are compatible and all component requirements are preserved by the composition. We propose to exploit functional requirements of CBS, specified with SysML Diagrams, and the composition of components to specify incrementally system architecture. Component interfaces are specified with SysML sequence Diagrams to capture their behaviors (protocols). From a requirement Diagram, we associate atomic requirements, represented as LTL properties, to reusable components satisfying them. LTL properties are verified on the components with SPIN model-checker. Then, we specify system architecture incrementally, with SysML Block Definition Diagram (BDD) and Internal Block Diagram (IBD), by treating, one by one the atomic requirements.

  • ECSA – Specifying system architecture from SysML requirements and component interfaces
    Software Architecture, 2013
    Co-Authors: Samir Chouali, Oscar Carrillo, Hassan Mountassir

    Abstract:

    We propose to map functional system requirements, specified with SysML, directly into system architecture, by exploiting the composition relation between component interfaces. Our research challenge is to guarantee formally that the final system fulfill the set of all requirements. Our approach is based on component-based systems (CBS) specified with SysML models and Interface Automata (IA) to capture their behaviors. From a SysML Requirement Diagram (RD), we build a Block Definition Diagram (BDD) to specify system architecture, by taking, one by one, the lowest level of requirements. At each new added requirement, we add a new component satisfying this requirement, by the composition, in the partial architecture obtained in a precedent step. Then we verify whether the new component is compatible with the components in the partial architecture, and if the requirements are preserved.

  • Assembling Components using SysML with Non-Functional Requirements
    , 2013
    Co-Authors: Samir Chouali, Ahmed Hammad, Hassan Mountassir

    Abstract:

    Non-functional requirements of component based systems are important as their functional requirements, therefore they must be considered in components assembly. These properties are beforehand specified with SysML requirement Diagram. We specify component based system architecture with SysML Block Definition Diagram, and component behaviors with sequence Diagrams. We propose to specify formally component interfaces with interface automata, obtained from requirement and sequence Diagrams. In this formalism, transitions are annotated with costs to specify non-functional property. The compatibility between components is performed by synchronizing their interface automata. The approach is explained with the example of the electric car CyCab, where the costs are associated to energy consumption of component actions. Our approach verifies whether, a set of components, when composed according to the system architecture, achieve their tasks by respecting their non-functional requirements.

Alan Grigg – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Model-based systems product line engineering with physical design variability for aircraft systems
    2016 11th System of Systems Engineering Conference (SoSE), 2016
    Co-Authors: Mole Li, Lin Guan, Charles Dickerson, Alan Grigg

    Abstract:

    Software Product Line Engineering (SPLE) has drawn large amounts of attention during the last two decades as it offers the benefits of reducing cost and time to market by reusing requirements and components. Recently, more and more large scale industries start to implement SPLE in their domains (combining SPLE with model-based modelling methods). However, the problem of how to combine SPLE with Model-Based System Engineering is still a challenge, as systems are much broader than the software domain. Unlike software engineering, system engineering has to consider the physical resources aspect. This paper classifies typical types of physical variability and provides general modelling solutions for each type of physical variation at the system design stage. Specifically, this approach combines a variability model with a SysML Block Definition Diagram and an Internal Block Diagram to model the contextual variability, architectural variability, connector variability, instance number variability, component variability, location variability and evolutional variability of physical designs. Variability is modelled separately to help reduce the complexity of design models. Last but not least, the proposed method is illustrated by an aircraft system case study.

  • SoSE – Model-based systems product line engineering with physical design variability for aircraft systems
    2016 11th System of Systems Engineering Conference (SoSE), 2016
    Co-Authors: Lin Guan, Charles E. Dickerson, Alan Grigg

    Abstract:

    Software Product Line Engineering (SPLE) has drawn large amounts of attention during the last two decades as it offers the benefits of reducing cost and time to market by reusing requirements and components. Recently, more and more large scale industries start to implement SPLE in their domains (combining SPLE with model-based modelling methods). However, the problem of how to combine SPLE with Model-Based System Engineering is still a challenge, as systems are much broader than the software domain. Unlike software engineering, system engineering has to consider the physical resources aspect. This paper classifies typical types of physical variability and provides general modelling solutions for each type of physical variation at the system design stage. Specifically, this approach combines a variability model with a SysML Block Definition Diagram and an Internal Block Diagram to model the contextual variability, architectural variability, connector variability, instance number variability, component variability, location variability and evolutional variability of physical designs. Variability is modelled separately to help reduce the complexity of design models. Last but not least, the proposed method is illustrated by an aircraft system case study.