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Blood Rheology

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Shin-ichi Momomura – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Effects of submaximal exercise on Blood Rheology and sympathetic nerve activity.
    Circulation, 2010
    Co-Authors: Nahoko Ikeda, Takanori Yasu, Ken Tsuboi, Yoshitaka Sugawara, Norifumi Kubo, Tomio Umemoto, Kenshiro Arao, Masanobu Kawakami, Shin-ichi Momomura

    Abstract:

    Background: To explore the acute effects of submaximal exercise on Blood Rheology and sympathetic nerve activity. Methods and Results: The effects of exercise (20 or 80 Watts (W)) on Blood Rheology and sympathetic nerve activity were assessed in 10 healthy Japanese men. Blood sampling and heart rate variability (HRV) recording were performed during 20-min supine rest and standing ergometric exercise (20 W for 10 min, 80 W for 10 min) and recovery. Blood passage time across the microchannels (diameter, 7 μm) as a parameter of Blood Rheology, and the number of adhesive leukocytes on microchannel terraces as a parameter of leukocyte activation were measured. Sympathetic nerve activity was evaluated by plasma noradrenalin levels and the ratio of low-frequency (LF)/high-frequency (HF) by spectral analysis of HRV. Compared with values while supine at rest, significant increases in hematocrit, leukocyte count, noradrenalin level and Blood passage time were seen after strenuous ergometer exercise at 80 W (P

  • effects of submaximal exercise on Blood Rheology and sympathetic nerve activity
    Circulation, 2010
    Co-Authors: Nahoko Ikeda, Takanori Yasu, Ken Tsuboi, Yoshitaka Sugawara, Norifumi Kubo, Tomio Umemoto, Kenshiro Arao, Masanobu Kawakami, Shin-ichi Momomura

    Abstract:

    Background: To explore the acute effects of submaximal exercise on Blood Rheology and sympathetic nerve activity. Methods and Results: The effects of exercise (20 or 80 Watts (W)) on Blood Rheology and sympathetic nerve activity were assessed in 10 healthy Japanese men. Blood sampling and heart rate variability (HRV) recording were performed during 20-min supine rest and standing ergometric exercise (20 W for 10 min, 80 W for 10 min) and recovery. Blood passage time across the microchannels (diameter, 7 μm) as a parameter of Blood Rheology, and the number of adhesive leukocytes on microchannel terraces as a parameter of leukocyte activation were measured. Sympathetic nerve activity was evaluated by plasma noradrenalin levels and the ratio of low-frequency (LF)/high-frequency (HF) by spectral analysis of HRV. Compared with values while supine at rest, significant increases in hematocrit, leukocyte count, noradrenalin level and Blood passage time were seen after strenuous ergometer exercise at 80 W (P<0.01 each). The LF/HF ratio and nitric oxide metabolites tended to be increased with 80 W exercise. Conclusions: Strenuous exercise dynamically alters Blood rheological parameters, probably by changes in hematocrit and sympathetic nerve activity. (Circ J 2010; 74: 730-734)

Philippe Connes – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • altered Blood Rheology and impaired pressure induced cutaneous vasodilation in a mouse model of combined type 2 diabetes and sickle cell trait
    Microvascular Research, 2019
    Co-Authors: Sarah Skinner, Philippe Connes, Dominique Sigaudoroussel, Ming Lo, Elie Nader, Audrey Jossetlamaugarny, Emmanuelle Charrin

    Abstract:

    Abstract Objective Type 2 diabetes (T2D)-related vascular dysfunction and hemorheological abnormalities could possibly be amplified by sickle cell trait (SCT). These alterations could potentially increase the risk of vascular complications in individuals with combined T2D and SCT. Therefore, this study used a mouse model to determine whether vascular function and Blood Rheology were more severely altered in combined T2D and SCT than in T2D or SCT alone. Methods Townes transgenic mice with or without SCT received a 12-week high fat high sucrose or standard diet to create models of combined T2D-SCT, T2D, SCT, and controls. Pressure-induced vasodilation (PIV) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-mediated vasodilation in-vivo, and hemorheological parameters were measured. Results No significant differences in Blood viscosity, hematocrit, erythrocyte deformability, or PIV were observed between the control and T2D mice, or the control and SCT mice. However, Blood viscosity, erythrocyte deformability, and PIV were significantly altered in the T2D-SCT mice compared to the control mice. There were no differences in SNP response between the groups. Conclusions Although neither T2D nor SCT alone had significant effects on Blood Rheology parameters or vascular function, combined T2D-SCT mice had significantly altered Blood Rheology and significantly impaired vascular function.

  • the role of Blood Rheology in sickle cell disease
    Blood Reviews, 2016
    Co-Authors: Philippe Connes, Tamas Alexy, Jon A Detterich, Marc Romana, Marie Dominique Hardydessources, Samir K Ballas

    Abstract:

    Studies performed in the last decades have highlighted the need to better understand the contribution of the endothelium, vascular function, oxidative stress, inflammation, coagulation, hemolysis and vascular adhesion mechanisms to the pathophysiology of acute vaso-occlusive like events and chronic organ damages in sickle cell disease (SCD). Although SCD is a hemorheological disease, a few works focused on the contribution of Blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, red Blood cell deformability and aggregation in the pathophysiology of SCD. After a brief description of basic hemoRheology, the present review focuses on the role of the hemorheological abnormalities in the causation of several SCD complications, mainly in sickle cell anemia and hemoglobin (Hb) SC disease. Several genetic and cellular modulators of Blood Rheology in SCD are discussed, as well as unresolved questions and perspectives.

  • Blood Rheology Blood flow and human health
    Nutrition and Enhanced Sports Performance#R##N#Muscle Building Endurance and Strength, 2013
    Co-Authors: Philippe Connes, Stephane P Dufour, Aurelien Pichon, Fabrice Favret

    Abstract:

    Aerobic exercise capacity is tightly related to the ability of the cardiovascular system to bring enough oxygen to active muscles. This chapter first focuses on skeletal muscle Blood flow control and presents its responses to acute and chronic exercise, with a particular emphasis on the role of the active muscle mass and environmental factors. The second part describes how Blood Rheology impacts on the regulation of Blood flow and vascular function. The effects of acute and chronic exercise on Blood Rheology are then discussed, including Blood viscosity, red Blood cell deformability and aggregation. The last part focuses on a selection of nutritional supplements considered to have an impact on the cardiovascular system, Blood flow responses, Blood Rheology and ultimately exercise performance. We discuss how intermediates of the nitric oxide metabolism, antioxidants as well as minerals and trace elements could modulate Blood flow and Blood Rheology, and improve endurance exercise performance.

Takanori Yasu – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Effects of submaximal exercise on Blood Rheology and sympathetic nerve activity.
    Circulation, 2010
    Co-Authors: Nahoko Ikeda, Takanori Yasu, Ken Tsuboi, Yoshitaka Sugawara, Norifumi Kubo, Tomio Umemoto, Kenshiro Arao, Masanobu Kawakami, Shin-ichi Momomura

    Abstract:

    Background: To explore the acute effects of submaximal exercise on Blood Rheology and sympathetic nerve activity. Methods and Results: The effects of exercise (20 or 80 Watts (W)) on Blood Rheology and sympathetic nerve activity were assessed in 10 healthy Japanese men. Blood sampling and heart rate variability (HRV) recording were performed during 20-min supine rest and standing ergometric exercise (20 W for 10 min, 80 W for 10 min) and recovery. Blood passage time across the microchannels (diameter, 7 μm) as a parameter of Blood Rheology, and the number of adhesive leukocytes on microchannel terraces as a parameter of leukocyte activation were measured. Sympathetic nerve activity was evaluated by plasma noradrenalin levels and the ratio of low-frequency (LF)/high-frequency (HF) by spectral analysis of HRV. Compared with values while supine at rest, significant increases in hematocrit, leukocyte count, noradrenalin level and Blood passage time were seen after strenuous ergometer exercise at 80 W (P

  • effects of submaximal exercise on Blood Rheology and sympathetic nerve activity
    Circulation, 2010
    Co-Authors: Nahoko Ikeda, Takanori Yasu, Ken Tsuboi, Yoshitaka Sugawara, Norifumi Kubo, Tomio Umemoto, Kenshiro Arao, Masanobu Kawakami, Shin-ichi Momomura

    Abstract:

    Background: To explore the acute effects of submaximal exercise on Blood Rheology and sympathetic nerve activity. Methods and Results: The effects of exercise (20 or 80 Watts (W)) on Blood Rheology and sympathetic nerve activity were assessed in 10 healthy Japanese men. Blood sampling and heart rate variability (HRV) recording were performed during 20-min supine rest and standing ergometric exercise (20 W for 10 min, 80 W for 10 min) and recovery. Blood passage time across the microchannels (diameter, 7 μm) as a parameter of Blood Rheology, and the number of adhesive leukocytes on microchannel terraces as a parameter of leukocyte activation were measured. Sympathetic nerve activity was evaluated by plasma noradrenalin levels and the ratio of low-frequency (LF)/high-frequency (HF) by spectral analysis of HRV. Compared with values while supine at rest, significant increases in hematocrit, leukocyte count, noradrenalin level and Blood passage time were seen after strenuous ergometer exercise at 80 W (P<0.01 each). The LF/HF ratio and nitric oxide metabolites tended to be increased with 80 W exercise. Conclusions: Strenuous exercise dynamically alters Blood rheological parameters, probably by changes in hematocrit and sympathetic nerve activity. (Circ J 2010; 74: 730-734)