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Blowout Fracture

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Jin Sik Burm – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • internal fixation in trapdoor type orbital Blowout Fracture
    Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 2005
    Co-Authors: Jin Sik Burm

    Abstract:

    Background: The most common orbital Blowout Fracture is a trapdoor type. In many cases of trapdoor Fracture, the bony segment has a stable hinge consisting of a greenstick Fracture and the sinus mucoperiosteum that is attached to the intact orbital wall. If the displaced bony segment opposite the hinge is reduced into the original position and fixed on the unaffected bone, the orbital Fracture may be reconstructed by internal fixation of the bony segment itself rather than requiring substitution with alloplastic implants or a bone graft. Methods: In 20 cases of orbital Blowout Fracture of a trapdoor type, internal fixation was performed using a cantilever fixation technique (with a piece of titanium micromesh or a titanium microplate plus a microscrew) or a ledge fixation technique (with a piece of micromesh). Results: In all cases, the orbital wall was accurately reconstructed in its normal anatomical position. The associated ocular problems disappeared except for mild diplopia in one patient and there were no surgical complications associated with the internal fixation. Conclusions: The advantages of internal fixation include anatomical reconstruction of the orbital wall; preservation of the original orbital bone and the mucoperiosteum of the sinus as an osteomucoperiosteal flap resulting in rapid wound healing and normal mucus drainage function of the sinus; the simplicity of the procedure; and con-sequently, the absence of surgery-related complications. This technique is presented as one of the preferred treatments for trapdoor-type orbital Blowout Fractures.

  • pure orbital Blowout Fracture new concepts and importance of medial orbital Blowout Fracture
    Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 1999
    Co-Authors: Jin Sik Burm, Chul Hoon Chung, Suk Joon Oh

    Abstract:

    Pure orbital Blowout Fracture first occurs at the weakest point of the orbital wall. Although the medial orbital wall theoretically should be involved more frequently than the orbital floor, the orbital floor has been reported as the most common site of pure orbital Blowout Fractures. A total of 82

Suk Joon Oh – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • pure orbital Blowout Fracture new concepts and importance of medial orbital Blowout Fracture
    Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 1999
    Co-Authors: Jin Sik Burm, Chul Hoon Chung, Suk Joon Oh

    Abstract:

    Pure orbital Blowout Fracture first occurs at the weakest point of the orbital wall. Although the medial orbital wall theoretically should be involved more frequently than the orbital floor, the orbital floor has been reported as the most common site of pure orbital Blowout Fractures. A total of 82

Gyeong Min Park – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • prognostic ct findings of diplopia after surgical repair of pure orbital Blowout Fracture
    Journal of Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery, 2016
    Co-Authors: Hyena Jung, Jae Young Byun, Gyeong Min Park

    Abstract:

    Abstract Purpose Diplopia is a common sequela of Blowout Fracture even after proper surgical management. We investigated the prognostic factors of diplopia after surgery of pure Blowout Fracture. Materials and methods We retrospectively reviewed CT images of 181 patients with pure orbital Blowout Fracture who underwent at least six months of postoperative follow-up. We evaluated the following CT factors: (1) Fracture site (orbital floor, medial wall of the orbit, or both), (2) Fracture type (closed flap, open flap), (3) Fracture size, (4) volume of herniated orbital soft tissue, (5) ratio of volume of herniated orbital soft tissue to Fracture size, (6) number of points of contact between extraocular muscle (EOM) and bony edge, (7) presence of EOM thickening, (8) EOM swelling ratio, (9) presence of displacement of EOM, (10) presence of deformity of EOM, (11) presence of tenting of EOM, and (12) presence of entrapment of EOM. The associations between diplopia at six months after surgical repair and various risk factors were analyzed using logistic regression models for univariable and multivariable analyses. Results EOM tenting and deformity and ratio of volume of herniated orbital soft tissue to Fracture size were found to be statistically significant risk factors of diplopia at six months after repair on univariable analysis (all P  Conclusion The prognosis of patients was predicted by CT evaluation. Patients who have tenting or deformity of EOM on CT scan are more likely to have postoperative diplopia.