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Bluefin Tuna

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Barbara A Block – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • In situ cardiac performance of Pacific Bluefin Tuna hearts in response to acute temperature change.
    The Journal of experimental biology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Jason M Blank, Thomas D Williams, Susanna B Blackwell, Jeffery M Morrissette, Ana M Landeira-fernandez, Barbara A Block

    Abstract:

    This study reports the cardiovascular physiology of the Pacific Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus orientalis) in an in situ heart preparation. The performance of the Pacific Bluefin Tuna heart was examined at temperatures from 30 degrees C down to 2 degrees C. Heart rates ranged from 156 beats min(-1) at 30 degrees C to 13 beats min(-1) at 2 degrees C. Maximal stroke volumes were 1.1 ml x kg(-1) at 25 degrees C and 1.3 ml x kg(-1) at 2 degrees C. Maximal cardiac outputs were 18.1 ml x kg(-1) min(-1) at 2 degrees C and 106 ml x kg(-1) min(-1) at 25 degrees C. These data indicate that cardiovascular function in the Pacific Bluefin Tuna exhibits a strong temperature dependence, but cardiac function is retained at temperatures colder than those tolerated by tropical Tunas. The Pacific Bluefin Tuna‘s cardiac performance in the cold may be a key adaptation supporting the broad thermal niche of the Bluefin Tuna group in the wild. In situ data from Pacific Bluefin are compared to in situ measurements of cardiac performance in yellowfin Tuna and preliminary results from albacore Tuna.

  • DISTRIBUTION OF WESTERN TAGGED ATLANTIC Bluefin Tuna DETERMINED FROM ARCHIVAL AND POP-UP SATELLITE TAGS*
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Barbara A Block, Andreas Walli, Andre Boustany, Charles J Farwell, Heidi Dewar, Eric D Prince, Tom Williams, Mike Stokesbury, Andrew C Seitz

    Abstract:

    SUMMARY The successful deployment in recent years of electronic tag technology on Atlantic Bluefin Tuna has improved our ability to examine their movements throughout the North Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea. This has rapidly improved the ability to distinguish where the Bluefin Tuna feed and breed. When biological and physical data from the tags are combined with information about sea surface temperature and ocean color from remote sensing technologies, the relationship between the movements and behaviors of the fish can be linked to oceanographic processes. This paper focuses on the results of electronic tagging of Bluefin Tuna in the western North Atlantic. RESUME

  • direct measurement of swimming and diving kinematics of giant atlantic Bluefin Tuna thunnus thynnus
    Royal Society Open Science, 2019
    Co-Authors: Steve Wilson, Robert J Schallert, Jonathan J. Dale, Adrian C Gleiss, Barbara A Block

    Abstract:

    Tunas possess a range of physiological and mechanical adaptations geared towards high-performance swimming that are of considerable interest to physiologists, ecologists and engineers. Advances in biologging have provided significant improvements in understanding Tuna migrations and vertical movement patterns, yet our understanding of the locomotion and swimming mechanics of these fish under natural conditions is limited. We equipped Atlantic Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus thynnus) with motion-sensitive tags and video cameras to quantify the gaits and kinematics used by wild fish. Our data reveal significant variety in the locomotory kinematics of Atlantic Bluefin Tuna, ranging from continuous locomotion to two types of intermittent locomotion. The Tuna sustained swimming speeds in excess of 1.5 m s−1 (0.6 body lengths s−1), while beating their tail at a frequency of approximately 1 Hz. While diving, some descents were entirely composed of passive glides, with slower descent rates featuring more gliding, while ascents were primarily composed of active swimming. The observed swimming behaviour of Atlantic Bluefin Tuna is consistent with theoretical models predicting such intermittent locomotion to result in mechanical and physiological advantages. Our results confirm that Atlantic Bluefin Tuna possess behavioural specializations to increase their locomotory performance, which together with their unique physiology improve their capacity to use pelagic and mesopelagic habitats.

Andre Boustany – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • DISTRIBUTION OF WESTERN TAGGED ATLANTIC Bluefin Tuna DETERMINED FROM ARCHIVAL AND POP-UP SATELLITE TAGS*
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Barbara A Block, Andreas Walli, Andre Boustany, Charles J Farwell, Heidi Dewar, Eric D Prince, Tom Williams, Mike Stokesbury, Andrew C Seitz

    Abstract:

    SUMMARY The successful deployment in recent years of electronic tag technology on Atlantic Bluefin Tuna has improved our ability to examine their movements throughout the North Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea. This has rapidly improved the ability to distinguish where the Bluefin Tuna feed and breed. When biological and physical data from the tags are combined with information about sea surface temperature and ocean color from remote sensing technologies, the relationship between the movements and behaviors of the fish can be linked to oceanographic processes. This paper focuses on the results of electronic tagging of Bluefin Tuna in the western North Atlantic. RESUME

  • estimating natural mortality of atlantic Bluefin Tuna using acoustic telemetry
    Scientific Reports, 2019
    Co-Authors: Barbara A Block, Michael J W Stokesbury, Rebecca Whitlock, Robert J Schallert, Steve Wilson, Mike Castleton, Andre Boustany

    Abstract:

    Atlantic Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus thynnus) are highly migratory fish with a contemporary range spanning the North Atlantic Ocean. Bluefin Tuna populations have undergone severe decline and the status of the fish within each population remains uncertain. Improved biological knowledge, particularly of natural mortality and rates of mixing of the western (GOM) and eastern (Mediterranean) populations, is key to resolving the current status of the Atlantic Bluefin Tuna. We evaluated the potential for acoustic tags to yield empirical estimates of mortality and migration rates for long-lived, highly migratory species such as Atlantic Bluefin Tuna. Bluefin Tuna tagged in the Gulf of St. Lawrence (GSL) foraging ground (2009–2016) exhibited high detection rates post release, with 91% crossing receiver lines one year post tagging, 61% detected after year two at large, with detections up to ~1700 days post deployment. Acoustic detections per individual fish ranged from 3 to 4759 receptions. A spatially-structured Bayesian mark recapture model was applied to the acoustic detection data for Atlantic Bluefin Tuna electronically tagged in the GSL to estimate the rate of instantaneous annual natural mortality. We report a median estimate of 0.10 yr−1 for this experiment. Our results demonstrate that acoustic tags can provide vital fisheries independent estimates for life history parameters critical for improving stock assessment models.

  • east not least for pacific Bluefin Tuna
    Science, 2017
    Co-Authors: Daniel J Madigan, Andre Boustany, Bruce B Collette

    Abstract:

    High market values have incentivized extensive fisheries for Pacific Bluefin Tuna ( Thunnus orientalis , see the photo), a species whose longevity, commercial value, and long generation time make it particularly susceptible to overfishing ( 1 , 2 ). Today, the population of Pacific Bluefin Tuna stands at an estimated 2.6% of prefished levels ( 1 ). Yet, knowledge of its basic life history is incomplete. Recent studies ( 3 , 4 ) suggest that the fundamental distribution of Pacific Bluefin across the North Pacific has been misunderstood. The results underscore the need for basic movement ecology information to assist science-based fisheries management.

Charles J Farwell – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • DISTRIBUTION OF WESTERN TAGGED ATLANTIC Bluefin Tuna DETERMINED FROM ARCHIVAL AND POP-UP SATELLITE TAGS*
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Barbara A Block, Andreas Walli, Andre Boustany, Charles J Farwell, Heidi Dewar, Eric D Prince, Tom Williams, Mike Stokesbury, Andrew C Seitz

    Abstract:

    SUMMARY The successful deployment in recent years of electronic tag technology on Atlantic Bluefin Tuna has improved our ability to examine their movements throughout the North Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea. This has rapidly improved the ability to distinguish where the Bluefin Tuna feed and breed. When biological and physical data from the tags are combined with information about sea surface temperature and ocean color from remote sensing technologies, the relationship between the movements and behaviors of the fish can be linked to oceanographic processes. This paper focuses on the results of electronic tagging of Bluefin Tuna in the western North Atlantic. RESUME

  • movements of pacific Bluefin Tuna thunnus orientalis in the eastern north pacific revealed with archival tags
    Progress in Oceanography, 2010
    Co-Authors: Andre Boustany, Charles J Farwell, Robyn Matteson, Michael Castleton, Barbara A Block

    Abstract:

    In this study, 253 Pacific Bluefin Tuna were archivally tagged off the coast of California, USA and Baja California, Mexico between August 2002 and August 2005. One hundred and fifty-seven fish were recaptured and 143 datasets were obtained and analyzed, yielding electronic tag datasets of up to 1203 days. Mean days at large for the 143 fish was 359 ± 248 (SD) days. A total of 38,012 geolocations were calculated from light-based longitude and SST-based latitude estimates, allowing us to examine the seasonal movement of juvenile Bluefin Tuna off the west coast of North America. Electronic tagged Bluefin Tuna showed repeatable seasonal movements along the west coast of North America. Bluefin Tuna were found farthest south in the spring when they were located off southern Baja California, Mexico and farthest north in the fall when fish were found predominately off central and northern California. Fish showed latitudinal movement patterns that were correlated with peaks in coastal upwelling-induced primary productivity. Interannual variation in the locality of these productivity peaks was linked with a corresponding movement in the distribution of tagged fish. Overall geographical area occupied by tagged Bluefin varied with primary productivity, with fish being more tightly clustered in areas of high productivity and more dispersed in regions of low productivity. In the spring through fall, Bluefin Tuna were located in areas with the highest levels of primary productivity available in the California Current ecosystem. However, in the winter months, tagged Bluefin Tuna were found in areas with lower productivity compared to other regions along the coast at that time of year suggesting that during the winter, Bluefin Tuna are feeding on aggregations of pelagic red crabs, sardines and anchovies that preferentially spawn in areas of reduced coastal upwelling.

  • annual migrations diving behavior and thermal biology of atlantic Bluefin Tuna thunnus thynnus on their gulf of mexico breeding grounds
    Marine Biology, 2007
    Co-Authors: Steven L H Teo, Michael J W Stokesbury, Charles J Farwell, Kevin C Weng, Heidi Dewar, Eric D Prince, Andrew C Seitz, Andre M Boustany, Shana Beemer, Barbara A Block

    Abstract:

    Electronic tags were used to examine the biology of Atlantic Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus thynnus L.) on their breeding grounds in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). The hypothesis that movement patterns, div- ing behavior, and thermal biology change during dif- ferent stages of the breeding migration was tested. Mature Atlantic Bluefin Tuna tagged in the western Atlantic and the GOM, were on their breeding grounds from February to June for an average of 39 ± 11 days. The Bluefin Tuna experienced significantly warmer mean sea surface temperatures (SSTs) within the GOM (26.4 ± 1.6� C) than outside the GOM (20.2 ± 1.9� C). As the Bluefin Tuna entered and exited the GOM, the fish dove to daily maximum depths of 568 ± 50 and 580 ± 144 m, respectively, and exhibited directed movement paths to and from the localized breeding areas. During the putative breeding phase, the Bluefin Tuna had significantly shallower daily max- imum depths (203 ± 76 m), and exhibited shallow oscillatory dives during the night. The movement paths of the Bluefin Tuna during the breeding phase were significantly more residential and sinuous. The heat transfer coefficients (K) were calculated for a Bluefin Tuna in the GOM using the recorded ambient and body temperatures. The K for this fish increased rapidly at the high ambient temperatures encountered in the GOM, and was significantly higher at night in the breeding phase when the fish was exhibiting shallow oscillatory dives. This suggests that the fish were behaviorally and physiologically thermoregulating in the Gulf of Mexico. This study demonstrates that the movement patterns, diving behavior, and thermal biology of Atlantic Bluefin Tuna change significantly at different stages of the breeding migration and can be used to define spawning location and timing.