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Bluetooth Device

The Experts below are selected from a list of 3015 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Oliver Storz – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • using Bluetooth Device names to support interaction in smart environments
    International Conference on Mobile Systems Applications and Services, 2009
    Co-Authors: Nigel Davies, Adrian Friday, Peter Newman, Sarah Rutlidge, Oliver Storz

    Abstract:

    An increasing trend in mobile and pervasive computing is the augmentation of everyday public spaces with local computation – leading to so called smart environments. However, there are no well accepted techniques for supporting spontaneous interaction between mobile users and these smart environments, though a wide range of techniques have been explored ranging from gesture recognition to downloading applications to a user’s phone. In this paper we explore an approach to supporting such interaction based on the use of Bluetooth Device (user-friendly) Names as a control channel between users’ mobile phones and computational resources in their local environment. Such an approach has many advantages over existing techniques though it is not without limitations. Our work focuses specifically on the use of Device Names to control and customize applications on large public displays in a campus environment. This paper describes our basic approach, a number of applications that we have constructed using this technique and the results of our evaluation work which has included a range of user studies and field trials. The paper concludes with an assessment of the viability of using our approach for interaction scenarios involving mobile users and computationally rich environments.

  • MobiSys – Using Bluetooth Device names to support interaction in smart environments
    Proceedings of the 7th international conference on Mobile systems applications and services – Mobisys '09, 2009
    Co-Authors: Nigel Davies, Adrian Friday, Peter Newman, Sarah Rutlidge, Oliver Storz

    Abstract:

    An increasing trend in mobile and pervasive computing is the augmentation of everyday public spaces with local computation – leading to so called smart environments. However, there are no well accepted techniques for supporting spontaneous interaction between mobile users and these smart environments, though a wide range of techniques have been explored ranging from gesture recognition to downloading applications to a user’s phone. In this paper we explore an approach to supporting such interaction based on the use of Bluetooth Device (user-friendly) Names as a control channel between users’ mobile phones and computational resources in their local environment. Such an approach has many advantages over existing techniques though it is not without limitations. Our work focuses specifically on the use of Device Names to control and customize applications on large public displays in a campus environment. This paper describes our basic approach, a number of applications that we have constructed using this technique and the results of our evaluation work which has included a range of user studies and field trials. The paper concludes with an assessment of the viability of using our approach for interaction scenarios involving mobile users and computationally rich environments.

Chih-yung Chang – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • relay reduction and disjoint routes construction for scatternet over Bluetooth radio system
    Journal of Network and Computer Applications, 2007
    Co-Authors: Gwojong Yu, Chih-yung Chang, Kuei-ping Shih

    Abstract:

    Bluetooth is a new technology for low-cost, low-power, and short-range wireless communication. By constructing a piconet, Bluetooth Device establishes link and communicates with other Device in a master-slave manner. Relay is a Bluetooth Device that joins two or more piconets and forwards data from one piconet to another, providing multi-hop (or inter-piconet) communication services. In a Bluetooth scatternet, the number of relays and the degree of each relay are factors that significantly affect the performance of entire network. Unnecessary relays raise the difficulty of scheduling, leading to frequent packet loss. Relay switching among several piconets in turns also creates guard time overhead and increases the transmission delay. This study presents an effective protocol that can dynamically adjust the network topology by reducing the unnecessary relays. An efficient scatternet environment thus can be constructed with characteristics of connected, high bandwidth utilization and low maintenance cost. Additionally, a routing protocol is developed to reduce the path length and generate two disjoint routes for any pair of source and destination Devices located in different piconets. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed protocols perform well in terms of route length, bandwidth consumption, and transmission delay.

  • PIMRC – TARP: a traffic-aware restructuring protocol for Bluetooth radio networks
    2005 IEEE 16th International Symposium on Personal Indoor and Mobile Radio Communications, 2005
    Co-Authors: Chih-yung Chang, Chao-tsun Chang, Sheng-wen Chang, Chih-hsiung Tseng

    Abstract:

    Bluetooth is a well-known wireless technology designed for wireless personal area networks (WPAN). The Bluetooth Device randomly searches and connects with other Devices using the inquiry/inquiry scan and the page/page scan operations, resulting an uncontrolled scatternet topology. The unpredictable scatternet topology usually raises the problem of redundant traffic and causes inefficient communications. A traffic-aware restructuring protocol (TARP) is presented for partially restructuring a piconet or neighboring piconets by applying role switch mechanism. According to the recent routes and their traffic pattern, the TARP adjusts piconet structure by selecting the proper master from Devices of a piconet and switches proper Devices of neighboring piconets to reduce the route length and thus improve the power and bandwidth consumptions and transmission delay. Performance results show that TARP significantly improves network performance by reducing traffic load and power consumptions

  • TARP: a traffic-aware restructuring protocol for Bluetooth radio networks
    2005 IEEE 16th International Symposium on Personal Indoor and Mobile Radio Communications, 2005
    Co-Authors: Chih-yung Chang, Chao-tsun Chang, Sheng-wen Chang, Chih-hsiung Tseng

    Abstract:

    Bluetooth is a well-known wireless technology designed for wireless personal area networks (WPAN). The Bluetooth Device randomly searches and connects with other Devices using the inquiry/inquiry scan and the page/page scan operations, resulting an uncontrolled scatternet topology. The unpredictable scatternet topology usually raises the problem of redundant traffic and causes inefficient communications. A traffic-aware restructuring protocol (TARP) is presented for partially restructuring a piconet or neighboring piconets by applying role switch mechanism. According to the recent routes and their traffic pattern, the TARP adjusts piconet structure by selecting the proper master from Devices of a piconet and switches proper Devices of neighboring piconets to reduce the route length and thus improve the power and bandwidth consumptions and transmission delay. Performance results show that TARP significantly improves network performance by reducing traffic load and power consumptions

Nigel Davies – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • using Bluetooth Device names to support interaction in smart environments
    International Conference on Mobile Systems Applications and Services, 2009
    Co-Authors: Nigel Davies, Adrian Friday, Peter Newman, Sarah Rutlidge, Oliver Storz

    Abstract:

    An increasing trend in mobile and pervasive computing is the augmentation of everyday public spaces with local computation – leading to so called smart environments. However, there are no well accepted techniques for supporting spontaneous interaction between mobile users and these smart environments, though a wide range of techniques have been explored ranging from gesture recognition to downloading applications to a user’s phone. In this paper we explore an approach to supporting such interaction based on the use of Bluetooth Device (user-friendly) Names as a control channel between users’ mobile phones and computational resources in their local environment. Such an approach has many advantages over existing techniques though it is not without limitations. Our work focuses specifically on the use of Device Names to control and customize applications on large public displays in a campus environment. This paper describes our basic approach, a number of applications that we have constructed using this technique and the results of our evaluation work which has included a range of user studies and field trials. The paper concludes with an assessment of the viability of using our approach for interaction scenarios involving mobile users and computationally rich environments.

  • MobiSys – Using Bluetooth Device names to support interaction in smart environments
    Proceedings of the 7th international conference on Mobile systems applications and services – Mobisys '09, 2009
    Co-Authors: Nigel Davies, Adrian Friday, Peter Newman, Sarah Rutlidge, Oliver Storz

    Abstract:

    An increasing trend in mobile and pervasive computing is the augmentation of everyday public spaces with local computation – leading to so called smart environments. However, there are no well accepted techniques for supporting spontaneous interaction between mobile users and these smart environments, though a wide range of techniques have been explored ranging from gesture recognition to downloading applications to a user’s phone. In this paper we explore an approach to supporting such interaction based on the use of Bluetooth Device (user-friendly) Names as a control channel between users’ mobile phones and computational resources in their local environment. Such an approach has many advantages over existing techniques though it is not without limitations. Our work focuses specifically on the use of Device Names to control and customize applications on large public displays in a campus environment. This paper describes our basic approach, a number of applications that we have constructed using this technique and the results of our evaluation work which has included a range of user studies and field trials. The paper concludes with an assessment of the viability of using our approach for interaction scenarios involving mobile users and computationally rich environments.