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Board Certification

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Gary L Freed – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Use of Board Certification in ambulatory surgery center credentialing: a pilot study.
    Journal of Healthcare Management, 2020
    Co-Authors: Kelly M Dunham, Dianne Singer, Gary L Freed

    Abstract:

    : Ambulatory surgical centers (ASCs) play a considerable role in providing surgical care in the United States. However, compared to hospitals, ASCs may have less oversight and less-well-developed policies for credentialing and privileging. Specialty Board Certification is one metric for measuring physician competence. What proportion of ASCs currently requires Board Certification for privileging is unknown. This article examines the relationship between Board Certification and privileging policies at ASCs in the United States. A telephone survey of privileging personnel among a convenience sample of 139 freestanding ASCs with two or more specialty services was conducted between February and May 2007. Fifty out of 81 eligible ASCs completed the survey, resulting in a cooperation rate of 62 percent. More than half of ASCs surveyed require that surgical specialists (54 percent, N=27), nonsurgical specialists (56 percent, N=22), and non-American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) specialists (56 percent, N=24) be Board certified at some point during their tenure. Among ASCs that call for Board Certification during physician tenure, 11 percent (N=3) require surgical specialists, 5 percent (N=1) require nonsurgical specialists, and 12 percent (N=3) require non-ABMS specialists to hold current Board Certification at the point of initial privileging. Twenty-nine ASCs (59 percent) allow physicians to retain their privileges after Certification expires. Ensuring safe medical care necessitates coordination across healthcare organizations and regulatory agencies. Nevertheless, our results indicate that almost half of multispecialty ASCs are not using this measure of physician competence issued by specialty Boards as part of their privileging process.

  • changes in hospitals credentialing requirements for Board Certification from 2005 to 2010
    Journal of Hospital Medicine, 2013
    Co-Authors: Gary L Freed, Kelly M Dunham, Acham Gebremariam

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE

    In 2005, we conducted a study of the prevalence of Board Certification requirements for hospital privileging and found that one-third of hospitals did not require pediatricians to be Board certified. In 2010, the American Board of Pediatrics implemented the Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. To examine changes in the policies of hospitals regarding requirements for Board Certification, we surveyed privileging personnel at hospitals across the country.

    STUDY DESIGN

    Telephone survey between April 2010 and June 2010 of privileging personnel at a random sample of 220 hospitals.

    RESULTS

    Of the 220 hospitals, 23 were ineligible because they had no pediatricians on staff, and 26 hospitals refused to participate. The remaining 154 hospitals completed the survey, resulting in a 78% participation rate. Compared with our findings in 2005, in 2010 a greater proportion of hospitals now require Board Certification for general pediatricians (80% vs 67%, P = 0.141) and pediatric subspecialists (86% vs 71%, P = 0.048). Among these hospitals, a larger proportion (24% vs 4%) now requires Board Certification for all pediatricians at the point of initial privileging. However, a greater proportion of hospitals reported that they make exceptions to their Board Certification policies (99% vs 41%).

    CONCLUSION

    In the 5 years since our previous study, a larger proportion of hospitals now require pediatricians to be Board certified, although the proportion of hospitals that make exceptions to this policy has increased twofold. Hospitals appear to be incorporating the MOC program into their privileging policies. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2013;8:298–303. © 2013 Society of Hospital Medicine

  • perspectives and preferences among the general public regarding physician selection and Board Certification
    The Journal of Pediatrics, 2010
    Co-Authors: Gary L Freed, Kelly M Dunham, Sarah J Clark, Matthew M Davis

    Abstract:

    Objectives To characterize parental attitudes regarding Board Certification and other factors that influence selection of physicians to care for children. Study design A web-based survey administered in 2008 to a random sample of 3621 adults ≥18 years of age stratified by parents and non-parents. Proportion of respondents who view Board Certification and other measures of quality as important factors in selecting a physician to care for children. Results Survey completion rate was 62%. Almost all (95%) believe it is important or very important for doctors who care for children to be assessed on their quality of care, receive high ratings from patients (91%), and pass a written test at regular intervals (88%). Most reported that recommendations from friends or family (84%) and Board Certification (82%) were important or very important factors in choosing a physician for their child. Seventy-seven percent of parents stated that they would be likely to change their child’s physician if he/she did not maintain Board Certification Conclusion Parents report a preference for Board-certified physicians and expect them to participate in Maintenance of Certification. Greater understanding of quality measures and the Board Certification process would empower consumers to make more informed decisions in selecting a physician for their children.

Kelly M Dunham – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Use of Board Certification in ambulatory surgery center credentialing: a pilot study.
    Journal of Healthcare Management, 2020
    Co-Authors: Kelly M Dunham, Dianne Singer, Gary L Freed

    Abstract:

    : Ambulatory surgical centers (ASCs) play a considerable role in providing surgical care in the United States. However, compared to hospitals, ASCs may have less oversight and less-well-developed policies for credentialing and privileging. Specialty Board Certification is one metric for measuring physician competence. What proportion of ASCs currently requires Board Certification for privileging is unknown. This article examines the relationship between Board Certification and privileging policies at ASCs in the United States. A telephone survey of privileging personnel among a convenience sample of 139 freestanding ASCs with two or more specialty services was conducted between February and May 2007. Fifty out of 81 eligible ASCs completed the survey, resulting in a cooperation rate of 62 percent. More than half of ASCs surveyed require that surgical specialists (54 percent, N=27), nonsurgical specialists (56 percent, N=22), and non-American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) specialists (56 percent, N=24) be Board certified at some point during their tenure. Among ASCs that call for Board Certification during physician tenure, 11 percent (N=3) require surgical specialists, 5 percent (N=1) require nonsurgical specialists, and 12 percent (N=3) require non-ABMS specialists to hold current Board Certification at the point of initial privileging. Twenty-nine ASCs (59 percent) allow physicians to retain their privileges after Certification expires. Ensuring safe medical care necessitates coordination across healthcare organizations and regulatory agencies. Nevertheless, our results indicate that almost half of multispecialty ASCs are not using this measure of physician competence issued by specialty Boards as part of their privileging process.

  • changes in hospitals credentialing requirements for Board Certification from 2005 to 2010
    Journal of Hospital Medicine, 2013
    Co-Authors: Gary L Freed, Kelly M Dunham, Acham Gebremariam

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE

    In 2005, we conducted a study of the prevalence of Board Certification requirements for hospital privileging and found that one-third of hospitals did not require pediatricians to be Board certified. In 2010, the American Board of Pediatrics implemented the Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. To examine changes in the policies of hospitals regarding requirements for Board Certification, we surveyed privileging personnel at hospitals across the country.

    STUDY DESIGN

    Telephone survey between April 2010 and June 2010 of privileging personnel at a random sample of 220 hospitals.

    RESULTS

    Of the 220 hospitals, 23 were ineligible because they had no pediatricians on staff, and 26 hospitals refused to participate. The remaining 154 hospitals completed the survey, resulting in a 78% participation rate. Compared with our findings in 2005, in 2010 a greater proportion of hospitals now require Board Certification for general pediatricians (80% vs 67%, P = 0.141) and pediatric subspecialists (86% vs 71%, P = 0.048). Among these hospitals, a larger proportion (24% vs 4%) now requires Board Certification for all pediatricians at the point of initial privileging. However, a greater proportion of hospitals reported that they make exceptions to their Board Certification policies (99% vs 41%).

    CONCLUSION

    In the 5 years since our previous study, a larger proportion of hospitals now require pediatricians to be Board certified, although the proportion of hospitals that make exceptions to this policy has increased twofold. Hospitals appear to be incorporating the MOC program into their privileging policies. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2013;8:298–303. © 2013 Society of Hospital Medicine

  • perspectives and preferences among the general public regarding physician selection and Board Certification
    The Journal of Pediatrics, 2010
    Co-Authors: Gary L Freed, Kelly M Dunham, Sarah J Clark, Matthew M Davis

    Abstract:

    Objectives To characterize parental attitudes regarding Board Certification and other factors that influence selection of physicians to care for children. Study design A web-based survey administered in 2008 to a random sample of 3621 adults ≥18 years of age stratified by parents and non-parents. Proportion of respondents who view Board Certification and other measures of quality as important factors in selecting a physician to care for children. Results Survey completion rate was 62%. Almost all (95%) believe it is important or very important for doctors who care for children to be assessed on their quality of care, receive high ratings from patients (91%), and pass a written test at regular intervals (88%). Most reported that recommendations from friends or family (84%) and Board Certification (82%) were important or very important factors in choosing a physician for their child. Seventy-seven percent of parents stated that they would be likely to change their child’s physician if he/she did not maintain Board Certification Conclusion Parents report a preference for Board-certified physicians and expect them to participate in Maintenance of Certification. Greater understanding of quality measures and the Board Certification process would empower consumers to make more informed decisions in selecting a physician for their children.

Dianne Singer – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Use of Board Certification in ambulatory surgery center credentialing: a pilot study.
    Journal of Healthcare Management, 2020
    Co-Authors: Kelly M Dunham, Dianne Singer, Gary L Freed

    Abstract:

    : Ambulatory surgical centers (ASCs) play a considerable role in providing surgical care in the United States. However, compared to hospitals, ASCs may have less oversight and less-well-developed policies for credentialing and privileging. Specialty Board Certification is one metric for measuring physician competence. What proportion of ASCs currently requires Board Certification for privileging is unknown. This article examines the relationship between Board Certification and privileging policies at ASCs in the United States. A telephone survey of privileging personnel among a convenience sample of 139 freestanding ASCs with two or more specialty services was conducted between February and May 2007. Fifty out of 81 eligible ASCs completed the survey, resulting in a cooperation rate of 62 percent. More than half of ASCs surveyed require that surgical specialists (54 percent, N=27), nonsurgical specialists (56 percent, N=22), and non-American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) specialists (56 percent, N=24) be Board certified at some point during their tenure. Among ASCs that call for Board Certification during physician tenure, 11 percent (N=3) require surgical specialists, 5 percent (N=1) require nonsurgical specialists, and 12 percent (N=3) require non-ABMS specialists to hold current Board Certification at the point of initial privileging. Twenty-nine ASCs (59 percent) allow physicians to retain their privileges after Certification expires. Ensuring safe medical care necessitates coordination across healthcare organizations and regulatory agencies. Nevertheless, our results indicate that almost half of multispecialty ASCs are not using this measure of physician competence issued by specialty Boards as part of their privileging process.

  • health plan use of Board Certification and reCertification of surgeons and nonsurgical subspecialists in contracting policies
    Archives of Surgery, 2009
    Co-Authors: Gary L Freed, Kelly M Dunham, Dianne Singer

    Abstract:

    Objectives To characterize the role of Board Certification in general surgeon, surgical specialist, and nonsurgical subspecialist credentialing and contracting policies and to examine possible variation among different types of health plans. Design Telephone survey conducted from October 27, 2006, through March 30, 2007. Setting Health plans across the United States. Participants Health plan credentialing personnel from a random sample of 223 health plans stratified by enrollment size, plan type, Medicaid enrollment, and tax status. Main Outcome Measures Proportion of health plans that require specialty Board Certification at initial contract or at some point during association with the plan and health plan requirements for reCertification. Results Of 223 health plans, 9 were ineligible, and credentialing personnel completed the telephone survey in 176, which resulted in an overall response rate of 82%. More than 60% of the health plans in this study did not require surgical specialists, general surgeons, or nonsurgical subspecialists ever to be Board certified to contract with the plan. Approximately two-thirds of respondents reported that they did not require surgeons (65%) or nonsurgical subspecialists (63%) with time-limited Board Certification to recertify in their specialty. More than half of the health plans reported that they made exceptions to their Board Certification policies based on geographic or network need. Conclusions Most health plans did not use specialty Board Certification to assess surgeon and nonsurgical subspecialist competence.

  • use of Board Certification and reCertification in hospital privileging policies for general surgeons surgical specialists and nonsurgical subspecialists
    Archives of Surgery, 2009
    Co-Authors: Gary L Freed, Kelly M Dunham, Dianne Singer

    Abstract:

    Objectives To better understand the relationship between Board Certification and credentialing policies for surgeons and nonsurgical subspecialists and to examine possible variation in use of Board Certification among different types of hospitals. Design, Setting, and Participants Telephone survey conducted from November 14, 2006, through March 16, 2007, of the privileging personnel among a random sample of 235 nonchildren’s hospitals stratified by teaching status, bed size, metropolitan statistical area, system affiliation, and tax status. Main Outcome Measures Proportion of hospitals that require specialty Board Certification to gain privileges and hospital requirements for reCertification. Results Of 235 hospitals, 11 were ineligible and 183 completed the telephone interview, resulting in an overall response rate of 82%. Approximately one-third of hospitals did not require surgeons and nonsurgical subspecialists ever to be Board certified to receive hospital privileges. Among the 109 hospitals that required Certification at some point, only 5 (5%) required surgeons and 3 (3%) required nonsurgical subspecialists to be Board certified at the point of initial privileging. More than three-fourths of hospitals had exceptions to their Certification policies for surgeons and 84 (77%) had them for nonsurgical subspecialists. Eighty-two percent of all hospitals and two-thirds of hospitals whose policies required reCertification allowed surgeons and nonsurgical subspecialists to retain privileges when their Board Certification expired. Conclusion Most hospitals do not consistently use Board Certification to ensure physician competence at their institutions.