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Bonded Interface

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D Arola – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • on the wear behavior and damage mechanism of Bonded Interface ceramic vs resin composite inlays
    Journal of The Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials, 2020
    Co-Authors: Ping Yu, Yuhuan Xiong, Peng Zhao, Zhou Xu, Haiyang Yu, D Arola

    Abstract:

    Abstract Advances in adhesive technologies have increased indications for the use of inlays. Decrease in the Bonded Interface integrity due to wear has been cited as the main cause of its failure. However, this process of Interface degradation and the influence of inlay material on damage mechanism appear to be poorly understood. Thus, we aimed to compare the wear behavior and Interface damage between ceramic and resin composite inlays Bonded to enamel under sliding contact and use the experimental findings to support recommendation of the appropriate inlay material. Bonded Interface specimens involving tooth enamel and either ceramic or resin composite inlays were prepared and subjected to reciprocating wear tests up to 5×104 cycles. The wear track profiles and morphologies were characterized after increments of cyclic sliding contact using white light interferometry and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Optical microscopy was used to evaluate sub-surface cracks and their propagation within the samples. A finite element analysis was used to analyze the stress distributions of the Bonded Interfaces. Composite inlays showed higher wear depth than the ceramic in the early stage (N ≤ 5×102 cycles), while no significant difference was found at the later stage. For ceramic inlay a greater portion of the contact load was concentrated in the ceramic structure, which facilitated cracks and chipping of the ceramic inlay, with rather minimal damage in the adjacent Interface and enamel. In contrast, for the resin composite inlay there was larger stress concentrated in the adjacent enamel, which caused the development of cracks and their propagation to the inner enamel. The restoration material could contribute to the stress distribution and extent of damage within enamel-inlay Bonded Interfaces. A tough ceramic appears to be more effective at protecting the residual dental tissue.

  • wear and damage at the Bonded Interface between tooth enamel and resin composite
    Journal of Dentistry, 2019
    Co-Authors: Zhou Xu, Ping Yu, Yuhuan Xiong, Peng Zhao, D Arola

    Abstract:

    Abstract Objective To investigate the wear mechanisms and evolution of damage in tooth enamel-resin composite Bonded Interfaces caused by sliding contact, and to develop an understanding of Interface degradation from a tribological viewpoint that supports clinical recommendations for improving Interface integrity. Methods Reciprocating wear tests were performed on Bonded Interface samples involving commercial resin composite (Tetric N Ceram Bulk Fill), resin cement (Rely X U200) and tooth enamel using the ball-on-flat configuration. The Bonded samples were subjected up to 5 × 104 cycles of sliding contact, and the wear depth and wear track morphology were characterized after increments using white light interferometry and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Optical microscopy was also used to evaluate cracks and their propagation in the samples. Results In the early stages of sliding contact, wear evolved most rapidly at the Interface, followed by the enamel and the resin composite. Gradually, the difference between the wear depth at the Interface and other areas decreased. Furthermore, cracks and brittle fracture appeared in the enamel during the early stages of wear, adjacent to the Interface. With continuing cyclic loading, enamel wear manifested primarily as ploughs, with discontinuous pits and peeled material. Cracking decreased to only a few cracks extending to the inner enamel and parallel to the Interface. Conclusions Cracking and damage occurred in the enamel during the early stages of sliding contact and accelerated by poor margin finishing. Cracks caused by wear under sliding contact could be one of the reasons for secondary caries and tooth discoloration.

  • designing multiagent dental materials for enhanced resistance to biofilm damage at the Bonded Interface
    ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, 2016
    Co-Authors: Mary Anne S Melo, Santiago Orrego, Michael D Weir, Huakun H.k. Xu, D Arola

    Abstract:

    The oral environment is considered to be an asperous environment for restored tooth structure. Recurrent dental caries is a common cause of failure of tooth-colored restorations. Bacterial acids, microleakage, and cyclic stresses can lead to deterioration of the polymeric resin–tooth Bonded Interface. Research on the incorporation of cutting-edge anticaries agents for the design of new, long-lasting, bioactive resin-based dental materials is demanding and provoking work. Released antibacterial agents such as silver nanoparticles (NAg), nonreleased antibacterial macromolecules (DMAHDM, dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate), and released acid neutralizer amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles (NACP) have shown potential as individual and dual anticaries approaches. In this study, these agents were synthesized, and a prospective combination was incorporated into all the dental materials required to perform a composite restoration: dental primer, adhesive, and composite. We focused on combining different de…

Thaneshan Sapanathan – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • strength changes and Bonded Interface investigations in a spiral extruded aluminum copper composite
    Materials & Design, 2014
    Co-Authors: Thaneshan Sapanathan, S. Khoddam, Seyed-hamid Zahiri, A Zareihanzaki

    Abstract:

    Abstract Fabrication of metal-based composites with concurrent grain refinement is an exciting and novel avenue in hybrid metal manufacturing. Copper clad aluminum rods, that were fabricated using Axi-Symmetric Forward Spiral Composite Extrusion (AFSCE) are investigated here as an example. Careful investigations of the bonding mechanism in the AFSCE samples are needed to control mechanical and physical properties of the composite material. In order to understand the mechanism of the bonding between copper and aluminum in the AFSCE process, morphological and micro-structural investigations were conducted by using a Scanning Electron Microscope/Focused Ion Beam (SEM/FIB) dual ion microscope and X-ray diffraction to study the nature of the Interface. Hardness measurements across the Interface region of the AFSCE sample were also produced to examine the deformation mechanism. A near flawless Interface, without significant intermetallic or oxide layer, was identified. The strength variation in the copper region was characterized using micro-hardness tests which agreed well with the Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) observations of various sampling points. It was also found that the micro-hardness values near the Interface and the outer periphery regions of the copper were higher than the hardness values at the middle region of the material, which is approximately equal to that of unprocessed copper.

  • Strength changes and Bonded Interface investigations in a spiral extruded aluminum/copper composite
    Materials and Design, 2014
    Co-Authors: Thaneshan Sapanathan, S. Khoddam, Seyed-hamid Zahiri, Abbas Zarei-hanzaki

    Abstract:

    Fabrication of metal-based composites with concurrent grain refinement is an exciting and novel avenue in hybrid metal manufacturing. Copper clad aluminum rods, that were fabricated using Axi-Symmetric Forward Spiral Composite Extrusion (AFSCE) are investigated here as an example. Careful investigations of the bonding mechanism in the AFSCE samples are needed to control mechanical and physical properties of the composite material. In order to understand the mechanism of the bonding between copper and aluminum in the AFSCE process, morphological and micro-structural investigations were conducted by using a Scanning Electron Microscope/Focused Ion Beam (SEM/FIB) dual ion microscope and X-ray diffraction to study the nature of the Interface. Hardness measurements across the Interface region of the AFSCE sample were also produced to examine the deformation mechanism. A near flawless Interface, without significant intermetallic or oxide layer, was identified. The strength variation in the copper region was characterized using micro-hardness tests which agreed well with the Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) observations of various sampling points. It was also found that the micro-hardness values near the Interface and the outer periphery regions of the copper were higher than the hardness values at the middle region of the material, which is approximately equal to that of unprocessed copper. © 2014.

Abbas Zarei-hanzaki – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Strength changes and Bonded Interface investigations in a spiral extruded aluminum/copper composite
    Materials and Design, 2014
    Co-Authors: Thaneshan Sapanathan, S. Khoddam, Seyed-hamid Zahiri, Abbas Zarei-hanzaki

    Abstract:

    Fabrication of metal-based composites with concurrent grain refinement is an exciting and novel avenue in hybrid metal manufacturing. Copper clad aluminum rods, that were fabricated using Axi-Symmetric Forward Spiral Composite Extrusion (AFSCE) are investigated here as an example. Careful investigations of the bonding mechanism in the AFSCE samples are needed to control mechanical and physical properties of the composite material. In order to understand the mechanism of the bonding between copper and aluminum in the AFSCE process, morphological and micro-structural investigations were conducted by using a Scanning Electron Microscope/Focused Ion Beam (SEM/FIB) dual ion microscope and X-ray diffraction to study the nature of the Interface. Hardness measurements across the Interface region of the AFSCE sample were also produced to examine the deformation mechanism. A near flawless Interface, without significant intermetallic or oxide layer, was identified. The strength variation in the copper region was characterized using micro-hardness tests which agreed well with the Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) observations of various sampling points. It was also found that the micro-hardness values near the Interface and the outer periphery regions of the copper were higher than the hardness values at the middle region of the material, which is approximately equal to that of unprocessed copper. © 2014.