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Bottlenose Whale

The Experts below are selected from a list of 174 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Katsufumi Sato – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • correction body density and diving gas volume of the northern Bottlenose Whale hyperoodon ampullatus
    The Journal of Experimental Biology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Patrick J O Miller, Saana Isojunno, Tomoko Narazaki, Kagari Aoki, Sophie Smout, Katsufumi Sato

    Abstract:

    There was an error published in J. Exp. Biol. 219 , [2458-2468][1].

    Eqn 1 was presented incorrectly. A ‘−1’ was missing after the ratio of densities, and the subscript of the first instance of the density of seawater (ρsw) was given incorrectly as ‘w’ instead of ‘sw’.

    The original

  • body density and diving gas volume of the northern Bottlenose Whale hyperoodon ampullatus
    The Journal of Experimental Biology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Patrick J O Miller, Saana Isojunno, Tomoko Narazaki, Kagari Aoki, Sophie Smout, Katsufumi Sato

    Abstract:

    Diving lung volume and tissue density, reflecting lipid store volume, are important physiological parameters that have only been estimated for a few breath-hold diving species. We fitted 12 northern Bottlenose Whales with data loggers that recorded depth, 3-axis acceleration and speed either with a fly-wheel or from change of depth corrected by pitch angle. We fitted measured values of the change in speed during 5 s descent and ascent glides to a hydrodynamic model of drag and buoyancy forces using a Bayesian estimation framework. The resulting estimate of diving gas volume was 27.4±4.2 (95% credible interval, CI) ml kg−1, closely matching the measured lung capacity of the species. Dive-by-dive variation in gas volume did not correlate with dive depth or duration. Estimated body densities of individuals ranged from 1028.4 to 1033.9 kg m−3 at the sea surface, indicating overall negative tissue buoyancy of this species in seawater. Body density estimates were highly precise with ±95% CI ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 kg m−3, which would equate to a precision of <0.5% of lipid content based upon extrapolation from the elephant seal. Six Whales tagged near Jan Mayen (Norway, 71°N) had lower body density and were closer to neutral buoyancy than six Whales tagged in the Gully (Nova Scotia, Canada, 44°N), a difference that was consistent with the amount of gliding observed during ascent versus descent phases in these animals. Implementation of this approach using longer-duration tags could be used to track longitudinal changes in body density and lipid store body condition of free-ranging cetaceans.

  • Body density and diving gas volume of the northern Bottlenose Whale (Hyperoodon ampullatus).
    The Journal of experimental biology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Patrick Miller, Saana Isojunno, Tomoko Narazaki, Kagari Aoki, Sophie Smout, Katsufumi Sato

    Abstract:

    Diving lung volume and tissue density, reflecting lipid store volume, are important physiological parameters that have only been estimated for a few breath-hold diving species. We fitted 12 northern Bottlenose Whales with data loggers that recorded depth, 3-axis acceleration and speed either with a fly-wheel or from change of depth corrected by pitch angle. We fitted measured values of the change in speed during 5 s descent and ascent glides to a hydrodynamic model of drag and buoyancy forces using a Bayesian estimation framework. The resulting estimate of diving gas volume was 27.4±4.2 (95% credible interval, CI) ml kg(-1), closely matching the measured lung capacity of the species. Dive-by-dive variation in gas volume did not correlate with dive depth or duration. Estimated body densities of individuals ranged from 1028.4 to 1033.9 kg m(-3) at the sea surface, indicating overall negative tissue buoyancy of this species in seawater. Body density estimates were highly precise with ±95% CI ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 kg m(-3), which would equate to a precision of

Patrick J O Miller – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • correction body density and diving gas volume of the northern Bottlenose Whale hyperoodon ampullatus
    The Journal of Experimental Biology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Patrick J O Miller, Saana Isojunno, Tomoko Narazaki, Kagari Aoki, Sophie Smout, Katsufumi Sato

    Abstract:

    There was an error published in J. Exp. Biol. 219 , [2458-2468][1].

    Eqn 1 was presented incorrectly. A ‘−1’ was missing after the ratio of densities, and the subscript of the first instance of the density of seawater (ρsw) was given incorrectly as ‘w’ instead of ‘sw’.

    The original

  • body density and diving gas volume of the northern Bottlenose Whale hyperoodon ampullatus
    The Journal of Experimental Biology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Patrick J O Miller, Saana Isojunno, Tomoko Narazaki, Kagari Aoki, Sophie Smout, Katsufumi Sato

    Abstract:

    Diving lung volume and tissue density, reflecting lipid store volume, are important physiological parameters that have only been estimated for a few breath-hold diving species. We fitted 12 northern Bottlenose Whales with data loggers that recorded depth, 3-axis acceleration and speed either with a fly-wheel or from change of depth corrected by pitch angle. We fitted measured values of the change in speed during 5 s descent and ascent glides to a hydrodynamic model of drag and buoyancy forces using a Bayesian estimation framework. The resulting estimate of diving gas volume was 27.4±4.2 (95% credible interval, CI) ml kg−1, closely matching the measured lung capacity of the species. Dive-by-dive variation in gas volume did not correlate with dive depth or duration. Estimated body densities of individuals ranged from 1028.4 to 1033.9 kg m−3 at the sea surface, indicating overall negative tissue buoyancy of this species in seawater. Body density estimates were highly precise with ±95% CI ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 kg m−3, which would equate to a precision of <0.5% of lipid content based upon extrapolation from the elephant seal. Six Whales tagged near Jan Mayen (Norway, 71°N) had lower body density and were closer to neutral buoyancy than six Whales tagged in the Gully (Nova Scotia, Canada, 44°N), a difference that was consistent with the amount of gliding observed during ascent versus descent phases in these animals. Implementation of this approach using longer-duration tags could be used to track longitudinal changes in body density and lipid store body condition of free-ranging cetaceans.

  • severity of expert identified behavioural responses of humpback Whale minke Whale and northern Bottlenose Whale to naval sonar
    Aquatic Mammals, 2015
    Co-Authors: Lise Doksaeter Sivle, Petter H Kvadsheim, Charlotte Cure, Saana Isojunno, Paul J Wensveen, Fleur Visser, Lars Kleivane, Peter L Tyack, Catriona M Harris, Patrick J O Miller

    Abstract:

    Controlled exposure experiments using 1 to2 kHz sonar signals were conducted with 11 humpback Whales (Megaptera novaeangliae), one minke Whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata), and one northern Bottlenose Whale (Hyperoodon ampullatus) during three field trials from 2011 to 2013. Ship approaches without sonar transmis-sions, playbacks of killer Whale vocalizations, and broadband noise were conducted as controls. Behavioural parameters such as horizontal movement, diving, social interactions, and vocalizations were recorded by animal-attached tags and by visual and acoustic tracking. Based on these data, two expert panels independently scored the severity of behavioural changes that were judged likely to be responses to the experimental stimuli, using a severity scale ranging from no effect (0) to high potential to affect vital rates (9) if exposed repeatedly. After scoring, consensus was reached with a third-party moderator. In humpback Whales, killer Whale playbacks induced more severe responses than sonar exposure, and both sonar exposures and killer Whale playbacks induced more responses and responses of higher severity than the no-sonar ship approaches and broadband noise playbacks. The most common response during sonar exposures in all three species was avoidance of the sound source. The most severe responses to sonar (severity 8) were progressive high-speed avoidance by the minke Whale and long-term area avoidance by the Bottlenose Whale. Other severe responses included prolonged avoidance and cessation of feeding (severity 7). The minke Whale and Bottlenose Whale started avoiding the source at a received sound pressure level (SPL) of 146 and 130 dB re 1 μPa, respectively. Humpback Whales generally had less severe responses that were triggered at higher received levels. The probability of severity scores with the potential to affect vital rates increased with increasing sound exposure level (SEL). The single experiments with minke and Bottlenose Whales suggest they have greater susceptibility to sonar disturbance than humpback Whales, but additional studies are needed to confirm this result.

Sascha K Hooker – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • uncertain status of the northern Bottlenose Whale hyperoodon ampullatus population fragmentation legacy of whaling and current threats
    Endangered Species Research, 2012
    Co-Authors: Hal Whitehead, Sascha K Hooker

    Abstract:

    The northern Bottlenose Whale Hyperoodon ampullatus is the best-known beaked Whale species, but its conservation status remains very uncertain. A medium-sized cetacean that lives in the deeper waters of the northern North Atlantic, it is remarkable for its deep dives and inquisitiveness towards ships. There seem to have been of the order of 100 000 Whales prior to 40 yr of intense whaling beginning in the 1880s, and this population was undoubtedly heavily reduced by 1920. The effects of a second phase of whaling between 1937 and 1973 are con- tentious, and current abundance estimates are patchy. There are suggestions of metapopulation structure (even at the scale of 50 km) in the western Atlantic among populations that do not appear to migrate. In the eastern Atlantic, data on population structure and migrations are few and confusing. Whales are incidentally caught in fishing gear and interact with fisheries off Labrador, Canada. They may also be affected by underwater noise. However, the population con- sequences of these and other anthropogenic stressors, particularly within this unknown metapop- ulation structure, are very uncertain. In some respects, such as the paucity of sightings on major whaling grounds off mainland Norway and Labrador, the picture that we have is disturbing. Analyses of genes, contaminants and vocalizations, as well as photoidentification and satellite tag data, can inform about population structure, migrations, life history parameters, current popula- tion sizes, and threats.

  • Fluctuations in distribution and patterns of individual range use of northern Bottlenose Whales
    Marine Ecology Progress Series, 2002
    Co-Authors: Sascha K Hooker, Shannon Gowans, Hal Whitehead, Robin W Baird

    Abstract:

    This study investigated the pattern and scale of distribution, movements and range use of the northern Bottlenose Whale Hyperoodon ampullatus above a submarine canyon, the Gully, off eastern Canada between 1988 and 1998. Locations and individual identification photographs were collected during encounters with Whales. Whales showed a discrete distribution within the canyon associated with water depth (500 to 1500 m) and relatively steep topography. Encounter rate and distribution showed some variation between years. Changes in distribution were observed toward the north or south of the canyon, probably a consequence of changes in prey distribution. Individual Whales within the canyon displaced 4 to 5 km over 24 h, with negligible further increase in displace- ment over time scales up to 20 d (their approximate residency period). Short-term VHF radio-track- ing of 5 individuals provided an independent source of movement data, showing displacements of approximately 2 km in 1 h and 5 to 10 km in 1 d. The relative lack of movement observed for these Whales supports the hypothesis that the canyon contains a profitable and localized food source. Movements of Whales best fit a model of short-term residence within ranges of approximately 25 km 2 , although the range size of mature males was smaller than that of females and immature males. Photo- resightings were also used to investigate variation in the positions of individual Whales within the Gully. Within years, individuals showed some separation of ranges associated with periods of high Whale abundance, but there was no separation between different age-sex classes. Between years, mature males showed consistent spatial orientations relative to each other, suggesting preferred locations possibly related to mating opportunities.

  • Social organization in northern Bottlenose Whales, Hyperoodon ampullatus: not driven by deep-water foraging?
    Animal Behaviour, 2001
    Co-Authors: Shannon Gowans, Hal Whitehead, Sascha K Hooker

    Abstract:

    Abstract It is postulated that deep-water foraging in sperm Whales, Physeter macrocephalus, has led to communal care of young and long-term female bonds. By studying the social organization of a second, unrelated, deep-diving species, the northern Bottlenose Whale, we investigated the role that deep diving may play in the evolution of cetacean sociality. Northern Bottlenose Whales in a deep-water canyon, the Gully off Nova Scotia, Canada, form small groups (X±SD=3.04±1.86). Associations within age/sex classes (female/immature, subadult male and mature male) were significantly higher than associations between different classes. Females and immature Bottlenose Whales formed a loose network of associations, showing no preferential associations with particular individuals or those from specific age/sex classes nor any long-term bonds. Mature and subadult males had stronger associations with individuals in their own class, and associations between some males lasted for several years, although males also formed many short-term associations. Overall the social organization of northern Bottlenose Whales in the Gully appears to resemble that of some Bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus, living in shallow, enclosed bays. Thus deep-water foraging does not appear to necessarily lead to the evolution of long-term bonds between females.