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Boundary Velocity

The Experts below are selected from a list of 285 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Max D Gunzburger – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Boundary Velocity control of incompressible flow with an application to viscous drag reduction
    Siam Journal on Control and Optimization, 1992
    Co-Authors: Max D Gunzburger, Thomas P Svobodny

    Abstract:

    An optimal Boundary control problem for the Navier–Stokes equations is presented. The control is the Velocity on the Boundary, which is constrained to lie in a closed, convex subset of $H^{{1 / 2}} $ of the Boundary. A necessary condition for optimality is derived. Computations are done when the control set is actually finite-dimensional, resulting in an application to viscous drag reduction.

  • Optimal Boundary control of nonsteady incompressible flow with an application to viscous drag reduction
    29th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, 1990
    Co-Authors: Thomas P Svobodny, Max D Gunzburger

    Abstract:

    The objective of this study is to characterize the Boundary Velocity distribution that in some sense gives the lowest viscous drag for viscous, incompressible flows. The case is considered where the control is explicitly constrained. Necessary conditions are presented for optimal controls for the Navier-Stokes equations in a bounded region. An application to reducing viscous drag by blowing and suction is discussed. The first part of the study considers static control; the second part is concerned with time-varying optimal controls.

Thomas P Svobodny – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Boundary Velocity control of incompressible flow with an application to viscous drag reduction
    Siam Journal on Control and Optimization, 1992
    Co-Authors: Max D Gunzburger, Thomas P Svobodny

    Abstract:

    An optimal Boundary control problem for the Navier–Stokes equations is presented. The control is the Velocity on the Boundary, which is constrained to lie in a closed, convex subset of $H^{{1 / 2}} $ of the Boundary. A necessary condition for optimality is derived. Computations are done when the control set is actually finite-dimensional, resulting in an application to viscous drag reduction.

  • Optimal Boundary control of nonsteady incompressible flow with an application to viscous drag reduction
    29th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, 1990
    Co-Authors: Thomas P Svobodny, Max D Gunzburger

    Abstract:

    The objective of this study is to characterize the Boundary Velocity distribution that in some sense gives the lowest viscous drag for viscous, incompressible flows. The case is considered where the control is explicitly constrained. Necessary conditions are presented for optimal controls for the Navier-Stokes equations in a bounded region. An application to reducing viscous drag by blowing and suction is discussed. The first part of the study considers static control; the second part is concerned with time-varying optimal controls.

Robert A Canfield – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Boundary Velocity method for continuum shape sensitivity of nonlinear fluid structure interaction problems
    Journal of Fluids and Structures, 2013
    Co-Authors: Robert A Canfield

    Abstract:

    Abstract A Continuum Sensitivity Equation (CSE) method was developed in local derivative form for fluid–structure shape design problems. The Boundary Velocity method was used to derive the continuum sensitivity equations and sensitivity Boundary conditions in local derivative form for a built-up joined beam structure under transient aerodynamic loads. For nonlinear problems, when the Newton–Raphson method is used, the tangent stiffness matrix yields the desired sensitivity coefficient matrix for solving the linear sensitivity equations in the Galerkin finite element formulation. For built-up structures with strain discontinuity, the local sensitivity variables are not continuous at the joints, requiring special treatment to assemble the elemental local sensitivities and the generalized force vector. The coupled fluid–structure physics and continuum sensitivity equations for gust response of a nonlinear joined beam with an airfoil model were posed and solved. The results were compared to the results obtained by finite difference (FD) method.

  • Boundary Velocity method for continuum shape sensitivity of nonlinear fluid–structure interaction problems
    Journal of Fluids and Structures, 2013
    Co-Authors: Robert A Canfield

    Abstract:

    Abstract A Continuum Sensitivity Equation (CSE) method was developed in local derivative form for fluid–structure shape design problems. The Boundary Velocity method was used to derive the continuum sensitivity equations and sensitivity Boundary conditions in local derivative form for a built-up joined beam structure under transient aerodynamic loads. For nonlinear problems, when the Newton–Raphson method is used, the tangent stiffness matrix yields the desired sensitivity coefficient matrix for solving the linear sensitivity equations in the Galerkin finite element formulation. For built-up structures with strain discontinuity, the local sensitivity variables are not continuous at the joints, requiring special treatment to assemble the elemental local sensitivities and the generalized force vector. The coupled fluid–structure physics and continuum sensitivity equations for gust response of a nonlinear joined beam with an airfoil model were posed and solved. The results were compared to the results obtained by finite difference (FD) method.