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Bourdon Tube

The Experts below are selected from a list of 207 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Paolo Dario – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Electrolytic Silicone Bourdon Tube Microactuator for Reconfigurable Surgical Robots
    Proceedings 2007 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, 2007
    Co-Authors: Robert J. Webster, Arianna Menciassi, Paolo Dario

    Abstract:

    Many compelling future surgical applications will be enabled by a new kind of surgical tool, capable of entering the human body through natural orifices or very small incisions and then reconfiguring into complex kinematic structures at the site of intervention. We describe a first step toward this goal – the development of a microactuator designed for use in surgical robots that are composed of large quantities of reconfigurable micro-robotic modules. The miniaturizable design proposed harnesses the Bourdon effect to convert electrolytic pressure into mechanical motion obtaining more than 400% displacement variation while consuming less than 0.5 W at less than 5 V. We describe the design, construction, and experimental results with our prototype microactuator.

  • ICRA – Electrolytic Silicone Bourdon Tube Microactuator for Reconfigurable Surgical Robots
    Proceedings 2007 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, 2007
    Co-Authors: Robert J. Webster, Arianna Menciassi, Paolo Dario

    Abstract:

    Many compelling future surgical applications will be enabled by a new kind of surgical tool, capable of entering the human body through natural orifices or very small incisions and then reconfiguring into complex kinematic structures at the site of intervention. We describe a first step toward this goal – the development of a microactuator designed for use in surgical robots that are composed of large quantities of reconfigurable micro-robotic modules. The miniaturizable design proposed harnesses the Bourdon effect to convert electrolytic pressure into mechanical motion obtaining more than 400% displacement variation while consuming less than 0.5 W at less than 5 V. We describe the design, construction, and experimental results with our prototype microactuator.

Robert J. Webster – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Electrolytic Silicone Bourdon Tube Microactuator for Reconfigurable Surgical Robots
    Proceedings 2007 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, 2007
    Co-Authors: Robert J. Webster, Arianna Menciassi, Paolo Dario

    Abstract:

    Many compelling future surgical applications will be enabled by a new kind of surgical tool, capable of entering the human body through natural orifices or very small incisions and then reconfiguring into complex kinematic structures at the site of intervention. We describe a first step toward this goal – the development of a microactuator designed for use in surgical robots that are composed of large quantities of reconfigurable micro-robotic modules. The miniaturizable design proposed harnesses the Bourdon effect to convert electrolytic pressure into mechanical motion obtaining more than 400% displacement variation while consuming less than 0.5 W at less than 5 V. We describe the design, construction, and experimental results with our prototype microactuator.

  • ICRA – Electrolytic Silicone Bourdon Tube Microactuator for Reconfigurable Surgical Robots
    Proceedings 2007 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, 2007
    Co-Authors: Robert J. Webster, Arianna Menciassi, Paolo Dario

    Abstract:

    Many compelling future surgical applications will be enabled by a new kind of surgical tool, capable of entering the human body through natural orifices or very small incisions and then reconfiguring into complex kinematic structures at the site of intervention. We describe a first step toward this goal – the development of a microactuator designed for use in surgical robots that are composed of large quantities of reconfigurable micro-robotic modules. The miniaturizable design proposed harnesses the Bourdon effect to convert electrolytic pressure into mechanical motion obtaining more than 400% displacement variation while consuming less than 0.5 W at less than 5 V. We describe the design, construction, and experimental results with our prototype microactuator.

Arianna Menciassi – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Electrolytic Silicone Bourdon Tube Microactuator for Reconfigurable Surgical Robots
    Proceedings 2007 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, 2007
    Co-Authors: Robert J. Webster, Arianna Menciassi, Paolo Dario

    Abstract:

    Many compelling future surgical applications will be enabled by a new kind of surgical tool, capable of entering the human body through natural orifices or very small incisions and then reconfiguring into complex kinematic structures at the site of intervention. We describe a first step toward this goal – the development of a microactuator designed for use in surgical robots that are composed of large quantities of reconfigurable micro-robotic modules. The miniaturizable design proposed harnesses the Bourdon effect to convert electrolytic pressure into mechanical motion obtaining more than 400% displacement variation while consuming less than 0.5 W at less than 5 V. We describe the design, construction, and experimental results with our prototype microactuator.

  • ICRA – Electrolytic Silicone Bourdon Tube Microactuator for Reconfigurable Surgical Robots
    Proceedings 2007 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, 2007
    Co-Authors: Robert J. Webster, Arianna Menciassi, Paolo Dario

    Abstract:

    Many compelling future surgical applications will be enabled by a new kind of surgical tool, capable of entering the human body through natural orifices or very small incisions and then reconfiguring into complex kinematic structures at the site of intervention. We describe a first step toward this goal – the development of a microactuator designed for use in surgical robots that are composed of large quantities of reconfigurable micro-robotic modules. The miniaturizable design proposed harnesses the Bourdon effect to convert electrolytic pressure into mechanical motion obtaining more than 400% displacement variation while consuming less than 0.5 W at less than 5 V. We describe the design, construction, and experimental results with our prototype microactuator.