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Brachialgia

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Jake Timothy – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion versus posterior cervical foraminotomy in the treatment of Brachialgia: the Leeds spinal unit experience (2008–2013)
    Acta Neurochirurgica, 2015
    Co-Authors: Senthil K. Selvanathan, Chris Beagrie, Simon Thomson, Rob Corns, Kenan Deniz, Chris Derham, Gerry Towns, Jake Timothy

    Abstract:

    Background The surgical management of cervical Brachialgia utilising anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) or posterior cervical foraminotomy (PCF) is a controversial area in spinal surgery. Previous studies are limited by utilisation of non-validated outcome measures and, importantly, absence of pre-operative analysis to ensure both groups are matched. The authors aimed to compare the effectiveness of ACDF and PCF using validated outcome measures. To our knowledge, it is the first study in the literature to do this. Methods The authors conducted a 5-year retrospective review (2008–2013) of outcomes following both the above procedures and also compared the effectiveness of both techniques. Patients with myelopathy and large central discs were excluded. The main outcome variables measured were the neck disability index (NDI) and visual analogue scores (VAS) for neck and arm pain pre-operatively and again at 2-year follow-up. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test and Student t -tests were used to test differences. Results A total of 150 ACDFs and 51 PCFs were performed for Brachialgia. There was no differences in the pre-operative NDI, VAS neck and arm scores between both groups ( p  > 0.05). As expected, both ACDF and PCF delivered statistically significant improvement in NDI, VAS-neck and VAS-arm scores. The degree of improvement of NDI, VAS-neck and VAS-arm were the same between both groups of patients ( p  > 0.05) with a trend favouring the PCF group. In the ACDF group, two (1.3 %) patients needed repeat ACDF due to adjacent segment disease. One patient (0.7 %) needed further decompression via a foraminotomy. In the PCF group one (2.0 %) patient needed ACDF due to persistent Brachialgia. Conclusions We found both interventions delivered similar improvements in the VAS and NDI scores in patients. Both techniques may be appropriately utilised when treating a patient with cervical Brachialgia.

  • anterior cervical discectomy and fusion versus posterior cervical foraminotomy in the treatment of Brachialgia the leeds spinal unit experience 2008 2013
    Acta Neurochirurgica, 2015
    Co-Authors: Senthil K. Selvanathan, Chris Beagrie, Simon Thomson, Rob Corns, Kenan Deniz, Chris Derham, Gerry Towns, Jake Timothy

    Abstract:

    Background
    The surgical management of cervical Brachialgia utilising anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) or posterior cervical foraminotomy (PCF) is a controversial area in spinal surgery. Previous studies are limited by utilisation of non-validated outcome measures and, importantly, absence of pre-operative analysis to ensure both groups are matched. The authors aimed to compare the effectiveness of ACDF and PCF using validated outcome measures. To our knowledge, it is the first study in the literature to do this.

Wolfgang Hönle – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Karpaltunnelsyndrom: Wann muss der Patient unter das Messer?
    DNP – Der Neurologe & Psychiater, 2018
    Co-Authors: Alexander Schuh, René Handschu, Thomas Eibl, Michael Janka, Wolfgang Hönle

    Abstract:

    Das Karpaltunnelsyndrom ist das häufigste Engpasssyndrom eines peripheren Nervs. Der Patient bemerkt ein — teilweise schmerzhaftes — Einschlafen der Hand mit Ausstrahlung in die Schulter (Brachialgia paraesthetica nocturna). Hinzu kommt ein Pelzigkeitsgefühl der radialen dreieinhalb Finger. Wann welche Therapieformen indiziert sind, fasst dieser Überblick zusammen.

  • Das Karpaltunnelsyndrom — wann muss der Patient unters Messer?
    Mmw-fortschritte Der Medizin, 2017
    Co-Authors: Alexander Schuh, René Handschu, Thomas Eibl, Michael Janka, Wolfgang Hönle

    Abstract:

    Das Karpaltunnelsyndrom ist das haufigste Engpasssyndrom eines peripheren Nervs. Der Patient bemerkt ein — teilweise schmerzhaftes — Einschlafen der Hand mit Ausstrahlung in die Schulter (Brachialgia paraesthetica nocturna). Hinzu kommt ein Pelzigkeitsgefuhl der radialen dreieinhalb Finger. Lesen Sie hier, wann welche Therapieformen indiziert sind.

Hannu Manninen – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • cervical rotation lateral flexion test in Brachialgia
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 1992
    Co-Authors: Karlaugust Lindgren, Eeva Leino, Hannu Manninen

    Abstract:

    Abstract The cervical rotation lateral flexion test (CRLF test), developed earlier, was used to examine patients with Brachialgia and thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) symptoms to detect possible restriction of the movement of the first rib. The test was performed for 23 patients, five of them both before and after treatment. The patients were assessed independently by two clinicians to analyze the interobserver reliability. A cineradiographic examination was performed so that any restriction of the movement of the first rib during expiration and inspiration could be detected objectively. The interobserver repeatability of the test was excellent, thus making the cineradiographic examination unnecessary. It is recommended that this test be included in the clinical investigation of all patients with Brachialgia with or without radicular pain.