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Brain Atrophy

The Experts below are selected from a list of 309 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Peter A Calabresi – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • revisiting Brain Atrophy and its relationship to disability in multiple sclerosis
    PLOS ONE, 2012
    Co-Authors: Navid Shiee, Pierrelouis Bazin, Kathleen M Zackowski, Sheena K Farrell, Daniel M Harrison, Scott D Newsome, John N Ratchford, Brian S Caffo, Peter A Calabresi

    Abstract:

    Background
    Brain Atrophy is a well-accepted imaging biomarker of multiple sclerosis (MS) that partially correlates with both physical disability and cognitive impairment.

  • retinal nerve fiber layer is associated with Brain Atrophy in multiple sclerosis
    Neurology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Eliza Gordonlipkin, Gary Cutter, B Chodkowski, Daniel S Reich, Seth A Smith, Mathew Pulicken, Laura J Balcer, Elliot M Frohman, Peter A Calabresi

    Abstract:

    Gordon-Lipkin et al. reported the correlation between the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and Brain parenchymal Atrophy in multiple sclerosis (MS).1 These results confirm our previous study where we found correlation between RNFL thickness and gray matter and white matter volume.2

    Using two different approaches for measuring Brain Atrophy, both studies demonstrate that the thickness of the RNFL correlates with Brain Atrophy. In both cases, we studied patients at the early to medium stage of the disease, indicating that the Atrophy identified, both at the head of the optic nerve and in the Brain, is …

Rohit Bakshi – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Rate of Brain Atrophy in Benign vs Early Multiple Sclerosis
    JAMA Neurology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Susan A. Gauthier, Rohit Bakshi, Annika M. Berger, Zsuzsanna Liptak, Yang Duan, Svetlana Egorova, Guy J. Buckle, Bonnie I. Glanz, Samia J. Khoury, Howard L. Weiner

    Abstract:

    Background Benign multiple sclerosis (MS) is defined by minimal or no disability after many years of observation, therefore a less degenerative disease process is suspected to be present in this subset of patients. Objective To compare Brain Atrophy rates in patients with long-standing benign MS vs typical early MS. Design A longitudinal prospective cohort study and a retrospective database review. Setting An academic MS center. Patients Thirty-nine patients with clinically defined benign MS and an age-matched group of 40 patients with early relapsing-remitting MS. Main Outcome Measures Baseline demographic, treatment, Brain magnetic resonance imaging measures, and annualized Atrophy rates, derived from serial Brain parenchymal fraction measurements across 2 years, were compared. Results In the baseline analysis, patients with benign MS were matched to the early MS group on age, sex, treatment with immunomodulatory therapy, T2 lesion volume, and Brain parenchymal fraction. The mean (SD) annualized Brain Atrophy rate in patients with benign MS (−0.16% [0.51%]) was lower than that in patients with early MS (−0.46% [0.72%]) ( P  = .02). The difference remained significant after controlling for age, sex, and treatment ( P  = .04). Conclusions Serial magnetic resonance imaging revealed a low 2-year rate of Brain Atrophy in patients with clinically benign MS, suggesting a less prominent degenerative component in its pathogenesis than in patients with typical early MS. Identification of patients with a low rate of Brain Atrophy may indicate a benign course.

  • the measurement and clinical relevance of Brain Atrophy in multiple sclerosis
    Lancet Neurology, 2006
    Co-Authors: Robert A Bermel, Rohit Bakshi

    Abstract:

    Summary Brain Atrophy has emerged as a clinically relevant component of disease progression in multiple sclerosis. Progressive loss of Brain tissue bulk can be detected in vivo in a sensitive and reproducible manner by MRI. Clinical studies have shown that Brain Atrophy begins early in the disease course. The increasing amount of data linking Brain Atrophy to clinical impairments suggest that irreversible tissue destruction is an important determinant of disease progression to a greater extent than can be explained by conventional lesion assessments. In this review, we will summarise the proposed mechanisms contributing to Brain Atrophy in patients with multiple sclerosis. We will critically discuss the wide range of MRI-based methods used to quantify regional and whole-Brain-volume loss. Based on a review of current information, we will summarise the rate of Atrophy among phenotypes for multiple sclerosis, the clinical relevance of Brain Atrophy, and the effect of disease-modifying treatments on its progression.

Navid Shiee – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • revisiting Brain Atrophy and its relationship to disability in multiple sclerosis
    PLOS ONE, 2012
    Co-Authors: Navid Shiee, Pierrelouis Bazin, Kathleen M Zackowski, Sheena K Farrell, Daniel M Harrison, Scott D Newsome, John N Ratchford, Brian S Caffo, Peter A Calabresi

    Abstract:

    Background
    Brain Atrophy is a well-accepted imaging biomarker of multiple sclerosis (MS) that partially correlates with both physical disability and cognitive impairment.