Breast Imaging - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Breast Imaging

The Experts below are selected from a list of 21120 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Albert Einstein – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Medical Directors of Breast Imaging Centers: Beyond Films
    Journal of The American College of Radiology, 2006
    Co-Authors: Jay R. Parikh, Albert Einstein

    Abstract:

    Over the past decade, Breast radiologists have been increasingly asked to fulfill a new dynamic role as medical directors of Breast Imaging centers. To our knowledge, there are no standardized job descriptions nor defined roles and responsibilities for this position. Job descriptions are usually crafted to fit unique institutional and individual situations. To be an effective medical director of a Breast Imaging center, Breast imagers must be more than just film readers. In this article, the authors describe the diverse roles of contemporary medical directors of Breast Imaging centers.

  • Medical directors of Breast Imaging centers: Beyond films
    Journal of the American College of Radiology, 2006
    Co-Authors: Jay Parikh, Albert Einstein

    Abstract:

    Over the past decade, Breast radiologists have been increasingly asked to fulfill a new dynamic role as medical directors of Breast Imaging centers. To our knowledge, there are no standardized job descriptions nor defined roles and responsibilities for this position. Job descriptions are usually crafted to fit unique institutional and individual situations. To be an effective medical director of a Breast Imaging center, Breast imagers must be more than just film readers. In this article, the authors describe the diverse roles of contemporary medical directors of Breast Imaging centers. Copyright © 2006 American College of Radiology.

Jay Parikh – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Medical directors of Breast Imaging centers: Beyond films
    Journal of the American College of Radiology, 2006
    Co-Authors: Jay Parikh, Albert Einstein

    Abstract:

    Over the past decade, Breast radiologists have been increasingly asked to fulfill a new dynamic role as medical directors of Breast Imaging centers. To our knowledge, there are no standardized job descriptions nor defined roles and responsibilities for this position. Job descriptions are usually crafted to fit unique institutional and individual situations. To be an effective medical director of a Breast Imaging center, Breast imagers must be more than just film readers. In this article, the authors describe the diverse roles of contemporary medical directors of Breast Imaging centers. Copyright © 2006 American College of Radiology.

Stephen A. Feig – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Survey of Radiology Residents: Breast Imaging Training and Attitudes
    Radiology, 2003
    Co-Authors: Lawrence W. Bassett, Dione M. Farria, Stephen A. Feig, Barbara Monsees, Robert A. Smith, Lily Wang, Parizad Hooshi, James Sayre, Valerie P. Jackson

    Abstract:

    PURPOSE: To investigate the training and attitudes of residents regarding Breast Imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A telephone survey was conducted with 201 4th-year residents (postgraduate medical school year 5) and 10 3rd-year residents (postgraduate medical school year 4) at 211 accredited radiology residencies in the United States and Canada. Survey topics included organization of the Breast Imaging section, residents’ role in the section, clinical practice protocols of the training institution, residents’ personal thoughts about Breast Imaging, and their interest in performing Breast Imaging in the future. RESULTS: Of 211 programs, 203 (96%) had dedicated Breast Imaging rotations; 196 (93%) rotations were 8 weeks or longer; 153 (73%), 12 weeks or longer. Residents dictated reports in 199 (94%) programs. Residents performed real-time ultrasonography (US) in 186 (88%) programs, needle localization in 199 (94%), US-guided biopsy in 174 (82%), and stereotactically guided biopsy in 181 (86%). One hundred ei…

  • Society of Breast Imaging residency and fellowship training curriculum
    Radiologic Clinics of North America, 2000
    Co-Authors: Stephen A. Feig, Debra M. Ikeda., G.w. Eklund, Ferris M. Hall, Ellen B. Mendelson, Eva Rubin, Mark C. Segel, Alfred B. Watson, Carol B. Stelling, Valerie P. Jackson

    Abstract:

    A curriculum for resident education in Breast Imaging has recently been developed by the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI) in response to a request from the Curriculum Committee of the Association of Program Directors in Radiology. The curriculum is the result of several years of work on the part of the SBI Ad Hoc Committee on Breast Imaging Training and also incorporates suggestions made by SBI fellows. Residency curricula for several other branches of radiology, including pediatric radiology and musculoskeletal radiology, have already been published by their respective subspecialty societies. The Breast Imaging residency curriculum is intended to serve three purposes: First, to provide guidance to academic chairpersons, residency program directors, and academic section chiefs in developing, assessing, and improving their residency training programs. Second, to list for residents the topics they need to learn and the experience they should try to acquire during their residency. Third, to specify for practicing radiologists the material they need to know to remain up to date in the practice of screening, diagnostic, and interventional Breast Imaging. The curriculum contains extensive and detailed lists of key concepts that the resident is expected to know in 14 areas. The curriculum also makes recommendations about residency training including the types of interventional Breast procedures that the resident should learn to perform, the number of mammography examinations he or she should interpret, the educational resources that should be available, and the length of time that should be spent on the Breast Imaging rotation. Although the curriculum recommends that the resident become familiar with several specific documents, such as the American College of Radiology (ACR) Mammography Quality Control Manual 3 and the ACR Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS), 2 the curriculum leaves the selection of other textbooks to the discretion of the resident and his or her mentors. The committee hopes that residents familiarize themselves with curriculum topics by means of many different learning resources. The curriculum should raise awareness of the full scope and complexity of material required for Breast Imaging. The committee hopes that the curriculum (1) influences residency program directors to allot a proportionate number of slots in their department lecture schedules to Breast Imaging conferences, (2) encourages Breast Imaging attendings to include curriculum topics in their conferences and discussions with residents, and (3) stimulates residents to devote more after-hours studying to Breast Imaging and also to observe and perform more interventional procedures under faculty guidance. In addition to developing a residency curriculum guide, the SBI Curriculum Committee also developed a curriculum guide for Breast Imaging fellowships. Breast Imaging is a subspecialty with an expanded role in patient care that incorporates knowledge from such fields as anatomy, pathology, physics, technology, and epidemiology. Breast Imaging has undergone enormous growth and change in recent years and these trends may be expected to continue in the future. As a result, the residency and fellowship curricula will likely require periodic updates.

  • An introduction to economic issues in Breast Imaging.
    Radiologic Clinics of North America, 2000
    Co-Authors: Dione M. Farria, Stephen A. Feig

    Abstract:

    Mammography facilities face significant economic challenges in today’s health care market. In an era of decreasing reimbursement, increasing patient demands, and strict federal regulations, it is difficult for many Breast Imaging centers to provide high-quality services without accepting a financial loss. For radiologists and administrators, understanding Breast Imaging economic issues is critical. This article discusses some of the economic factors that shape the practice of mammography in the United States, including Medicare reimbursement, the role of new technology, the cost-effectiveness of screening mammography, and current economic challenges. A glossary of relevant economic terms is included at the end of this article.