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Brie Cheese

The Experts below are selected from a list of 141 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Manuel Nunez – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • effect of high pressure processing on lipolysis and volatile compounds of Brie Cheese during ripening and refrigerated storage
    International Dairy Journal, 2014
    Co-Authors: Javier Calzada, Ana Del Olmo, Antonia Picon, Manuel Nunez

    Abstract:

    Abstract Brie Cheeses were high pressure (HP)-treated at 400 or 600 MPa, on days 14 or 21 after manufacture, to prevent over-ripening. HP-treatment reduced total free fatty acid content of 120-day-old Cheese by up to 88.5%. On day 120, HP-treated Cheeses had levels of alcohols, aldehydes, acids, esters and ethers up to 3.4, 1.9, 43.8, 18.7 and 5.6 times higher, respectively, than control Cheese, while ketones and hydrocarbons levels were up to 88.6% and 48.9% lower, respectively. Levels of sulphur compounds, pyrazines and amines increased drastically in control Cheese from day 60 onwards, resulting in lower odour quality scores. On day 120, HP-treated Cheeses had levels of sulphur compounds, pyrazines and amines up to 96.9%, 99.3% and 99.4% lower, respectively, than control Cheese. Cheese appearance was impaired by HP-treatment, resulting in lower lightness and slightly more reddish and yellowish colour. These changes might diminish consumer acceptance of HP-treated Brie Cheese.

  • effect of high pressure processing on the microbiology proteolysis texture and flavour of Brie Cheese during ripening and refrigerated storage
    International Dairy Journal, 2014
    Co-Authors: Javier Calzada, Ana Del Olmo, Antonia Picon, Pilar Gaya, Manuel Nunez

    Abstract:

    Abstract Brie Cheeses were high pressure (HP)-treated at 400 or 600 MPa on days 14 or 21 after manufacture to prevent over-ripening. Lactic acid bacteria and Penicillium camemberti numbers declined markedly after HP treatment. In control Cheese pH increased 2.0 units from day 21 to day 60, but less than 0.3 units in HP-treated Cheeses. Cheeses treated at 600 MPa showed the maximum concentrations of residual caseins during refrigerated storage and control Cheese the minimum concentrations. A 7.6-fold increase in hydrophobic peptides was recorded from day 21 to day 60 in control Cheese and 0.8–1.6-fold increases in HP-treated Cheeses. The maximum aminopeptidase activity was detected in control Cheese, the highest free amino acid concentrations in Cheeses treated at 400 MPa. The firmest texture was recorded for Cheeses treated on day 14 at 400 or 600 MPa. HP-treated Cheeses showed higher flavour quality scores than control Cheese from day 60 onwards.

Javier Calzada – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • effect of high pressure processing on lipolysis and volatile compounds of Brie Cheese during ripening and refrigerated storage
    International Dairy Journal, 2014
    Co-Authors: Javier Calzada, Ana Del Olmo, Antonia Picon, Manuel Nunez

    Abstract:

    Abstract Brie Cheeses were high pressure (HP)-treated at 400 or 600 MPa, on days 14 or 21 after manufacture, to prevent over-ripening. HP-treatment reduced total free fatty acid content of 120-day-old Cheese by up to 88.5%. On day 120, HP-treated Cheeses had levels of alcohols, aldehydes, acids, esters and ethers up to 3.4, 1.9, 43.8, 18.7 and 5.6 times higher, respectively, than control Cheese, while ketones and hydrocarbons levels were up to 88.6% and 48.9% lower, respectively. Levels of sulphur compounds, pyrazines and amines increased drastically in control Cheese from day 60 onwards, resulting in lower odour quality scores. On day 120, HP-treated Cheeses had levels of sulphur compounds, pyrazines and amines up to 96.9%, 99.3% and 99.4% lower, respectively, than control Cheese. Cheese appearance was impaired by HP-treatment, resulting in lower lightness and slightly more reddish and yellowish colour. These changes might diminish consumer acceptance of HP-treated Brie Cheese.

  • effect of high pressure processing on the microbiology proteolysis texture and flavour of Brie Cheese during ripening and refrigerated storage
    International Dairy Journal, 2014
    Co-Authors: Javier Calzada, Ana Del Olmo, Antonia Picon, Pilar Gaya, Manuel Nunez

    Abstract:

    Abstract Brie Cheeses were high pressure (HP)-treated at 400 or 600 MPa on days 14 or 21 after manufacture to prevent over-ripening. Lactic acid bacteria and Penicillium camemberti numbers declined markedly after HP treatment. In control Cheese pH increased 2.0 units from day 21 to day 60, but less than 0.3 units in HP-treated Cheeses. Cheeses treated at 600 MPa showed the maximum concentrations of residual caseins during refrigerated storage and control Cheese the minimum concentrations. A 7.6-fold increase in hydrophobic peptides was recorded from day 21 to day 60 in control Cheese and 0.8–1.6-fold increases in HP-treated Cheeses. The maximum aminopeptidase activity was detected in control Cheese, the highest free amino acid concentrations in Cheeses treated at 400 MPa. The firmest texture was recorded for Cheeses treated on day 14 at 400 or 600 MPa. HP-treated Cheeses showed higher flavour quality scores than control Cheese from day 60 onwards.

Alberto Gallace – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Tasting shapes and words
    Food Quality and Preference, 2011
    Co-Authors: Charles Spence, Alberto Gallace

    Abstract:

    Abstract We report a series of quick and simple paper-and-pencil demonstrations illustrating the reliable crossmodal correspondences that people have between commercially-available food and drink items and both visually-presented shapes and nonsense words. The foodstuffs tested in this study included still and sparkling water, Brie Cheese and cranberry juice, and two kinds of chocolate. Participants were given paper-based line scales, anchored at either end with a nonsense word or simple outline shape. They were instructed to taste the foodstuffs and to indicate whether their perception of the flavour matched more one or other of the items anchoring the scales, and then mark the appropriate point on the scale. The results highlight the fact that certain of these foodstuffs (sparkling water, cranberry juice, and Maltesers – chocolate-covered malt honeycomb) were better associated with angular shapes and high-pitched meaningless words, such as ‘kiki’ and ‘takete’, whose pronunciation requires sharp inflection of the mouth. By contrast, still water, Brie, and Caramel Nibbles (chocolate-covered caramel) were all more strongly associated with rounded shapes and softer sounding, lower-pitched pseudo-words, such as ‘bouba’ and ‘maluma’. These results, which build on the classic literature on ‘sound symbolism’, have both theoretical and applied implications: On the one hand, they demonstrate that the phenomenon of sound symbolism extends beyond the visual modality, by showing that speech sounds carry meaning in the domain of flavour, and in terms of the oral-somatosensory attributes of foodstuffs as well. As a consequence, these results may also be useful on an applied level in terms of helping companies to design novel brand names and graphics for the packaging of their food and drink items that best connote the likely attributes of the product within.

  • Tasting shapes and words
    Food Quality and Preference, 2011
    Co-Authors: Charles Spence, Alberto Gallace

    Abstract:

    We report a series of quick and simple paper-and-pencil demonstrations illustrating the reliable crossmodal correspondences that people have between commercially-available food and drink items and both visually-presented shapes and nonsense words. The foodstuffs tested in this study included still and sparkling water, Brie Cheese and cranberry juice, and two kinds of chocolate. Participants were given paper-based line scales, anchored at either end with a nonsense word or simple outline shape. They were instructed to taste the foodstuffs and to indicate whether their perception of the flavour matched more one or other of the items anchoring the scales, and then mark the appropriate point on the scale. The results highlight the fact that certain of these foodstuffs (sparkling water, cranberry juice, and Maltesers – chocolate-covered malt honeycomb) were better associated with angular shapes and high-pitched meaningless words, such as ‘kiki’ and ‘takete’, whose pronunciation requires sharp inflection of the mouth. By contrast, still water, Brie, and Caramel Nibbles (chocolate-covered caramel) were all more strongly associated with rounded shapes and softer sounding, lower-pitched pseudo-words, such as ‘bouba’ and ‘maluma’. These results, which build on the classic literature on ‘sound symbolism’, have both theoretical and applied implications: On the one hand, they demonstrate that the phenomenon of sound symbolism extends beyond the visual modality, by showing that speech sounds carry meaning in the domain of flavour, and in terms of the oral-somatosensory attributes of foodstuffs as well. As a consequence, these results may also be useful on an applied level in terms of helping companies to design novel brand names and graphics for the packaging of their food and drink items that best connote the likely attributes of the product within. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  • On the taste of “Bouba” and “Kiki”: An exploration of word-food associations in neurologically normal participants.
    Cognitive Neuroscience, 2010
    Co-Authors: Alberto Gallace, Erica A. Boschin, Charles Spence

    Abstract:

    We investigated whether there are reliable crossmodal associations between foods/flavours and words in neurologically normal individuals. Participants were given a range of foods to taste, and had to rate each one along a number of dimensions. These included scales anchored with the words “takete/maluma” and “bouba/kiki”. The results highlight the existence of robust crossmodal associations between complex foods/flavours and words in normal (i.e., nonsynesthetic) individuals. For example, crisps (potato chips) and cranberry sauce are rated as being more “takete” than Brie Cheese, while mint chocolate is rated as more “kiki” than regular chocolate. On the basis of these results, we suggest that our brains can extract supramodal/conceptual properties from foods/flavours (just as has been demonstrated previously using auditory and visual stimuli) and meaningfully match them crossmodally. The possibility that this process is based on the global Gestalt of a food rather than on any specific sensory qualities i…