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Rachel Johnson – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Is Beric a Briton?: the Representation of Cultural Identity in G.A. Henty’s Beric the Briton (1893) and Rosemary Sutcliff’s The Outcast (1955)
    , 2009
    Co-Authors: Rachel Johnson

    Abstract:

    This article is an investigation into differences in the representation of cultural identity represented in Beric the Britain by G.A. Henty (1893) and The Outcast by Rosemary Sutcliff (1955).
    G.A. Henty (1824-1902) and Rosemary Sutcliff (1920-1992) both present narratives of Britain under Roman invasion through the character of a young protagonist, initially perceived in both narratives as the product of a British tribal chieftain’s family with a clear cultural identity. Henty wrote in the second half of the nineteenth century at the height of imperial expansion when the sense of English cultural identity was strong. In contrast, Rosemary Sutcliff, writing post-empire, represents a more complex sense of identity. I investigate the mixed cultural identity of Sutcliff’s protagonist against the foundation of the exclusively British cultural identity of Henty’s Beric, thus foregrounding the increasing destabilization of cultural identity demonstrated in these two texts.

  • is beric a Briton the representation of cultural identity in g a henty s beric the Briton 1893 and rosemary sutcliff s the outcast 1955
    , 2009
    Co-Authors: Rachel Johnson

    Abstract:

    This article is an investigation into differences in the representation of cultural identity represented in Beric the Britain by G.A. Henty (1893) and The Outcast by Rosemary Sutcliff (1955).
    G.A. Henty (1824-1902) and Rosemary Sutcliff (1920-1992) both present narratives of Britain under Roman invasion through the character of a young protagonist, initially perceived in both narratives as the product of a British tribal chieftain’s family with a clear cultural identity. Henty wrote in the second half of the nineteenth century at the height of imperial expansion when the sense of English cultural identity was strong. In contrast, Rosemary Sutcliff, writing post-empire, represents a more complex sense of identity. I investigate the mixed cultural identity of Sutcliff’s protagonist against the foundation of the exclusively British cultural identity of Henty’s Beric, thus foregrounding the increasing destabilization of cultural identity demonstrated in these two texts.

Andrew Breeze – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • The Ancient Britons and Cronton, Lancashire
    Northern History, 2020
    Co-Authors: Andrew Breeze

    Abstract:

    CRONTON (SJ 4988), formerly in Lancashire and now in Merseyside, is a village (with an old cross) two miles north of Widnes. It is recorded as Crohinton and Growynton in 1242, Crouington in 1246, and Crouwenton in 1333. These forms have puzzled scholars. Ekwall proposed an interpretation from Old English crawena tun, ‘settlement of crows, homestead where crows gather’, though he admitted that the lack of a in the first element counted against this; Mills doubtfully suggests ‘farmstead at the place with a nook (Old English croh)’.1 Yet there seems a likelier solution. Cronton is four miles west of Penketh and Great Sankey, which have Celtic names. The first means ‘wood end’ (cf. Welsh pen and coed), the second may mean ‘treader, trampler’ (cf. Welsh sangi), originally referring to Sankey Brook.2 That may help us with Cronton. The first element seems equivalent to Middle Welsh crowyn ‘shed for animals, sty, coop, kennel’. This is attested in the medieval Welsh laws, which declare that a sucking pig in its sty (parchell yn y growyn) is worth a penny.3 At Cronton there hence appears to be a Brittonic form meaning ‘shed’, probably for pigs, to which Old English tun ‘farmstead’ has been added. Such an interpretation would have parallels. Loose, south of Maidstone in Kent, has an English name meaning ‘pig-sty’ (Old English hlose).4 The hamlet of Cororion (SH 5968), near Bangor in North Wales (and figuring in the twelfth-century Four Branches of the Mabinogi), is ‘Gwrion’s sty (creu)’.5 The Cornish cognate of creu is krow, found on the map at Colgrease ‘middle hut’ (SW 7958), a farm near Newquay, Cornwall.6

  • Britons in West Derby Hundred, Lancashire
    Northern History, 2020
    Co-Authors: Andrew Breeze

    Abstract:

    LANCASHIRE has many Celtic toponyms and almost no Anglo-Saxon archaeology. Maps make the point clear. One of pre-English toponymy will include the names of Cark, Cuerden, Haydock, Mellor, Penketh, Sankey, Treales, Werneth, Wigan, and so on, where the forms are evidently not English. The pattern is repeated by the element eccles (cf. Welsh eglwys ‘church’), with instances at Eccles near Manchester, Eccleston near St Helens, Eccleston near Chorley, Great Eccleston and Little Eccleston on the Wyre near Poulton, and Eccleshill near Darwen.2 These place-names are striking evidence for the early Celtic inhabitants of what is now Lancashire. In mute contrast are maps of Anglo-Saxon settlements and cemeteries for the pre-conversion period. On them, Lancashire is a blank.3 But can one say more on Lancashire’s Celtic toponyms? Very much so, it seems. Some years ago Pamela Russell, formerly of Liverpool University, set out the evidence they give for Britons in West Derby Hundred (one of the five medieval hundreds of southern Lancashire, effectively the coastal area between Mersey and Ribble). Her discoveries of Celtic place-names in the archives are significant, but her linguistic analysis needs revision. What follows thus has three functions: it examines her philological comments on Celtic and other toponyms; sets out implications of a revised account of them; and compares similar material from the rest of south Lancashire. It should thereby show what local place-names can tell historians and others. If it does, it provides an exercise repeatable for many other English hundreds, especially those in northern England. Pamela Russell’s paper comments on fifteen toponyms in West Derby Hundred and one outside it. The places concerned are Maghull, Alt, Broni Damfield, Incer Field, Dwerefield, Haydock, Ince, Walton (three times), Dowlache, Louchangile, Cundlache Bridge, Carketon, Brettargh Holt, and Bretland. They can be arranged in five geographical groups, as follows:

  • elaphus the Briton st germanus and bede
    The Journal of Theological Studies, 2002
    Co-Authors: Andrew Breeze

    Abstract:

    Cet article s’interroge sur l’identite d’un certain Elaphus, evoque dans l’Histoire Ecclesiastique de Bede comme un notable breton (de Grande-Bretagne) rencontre par Germain d’Auxerre lors de ses missions contre les Pelagiens (Ve siecle). S’agit-il d’un chef celte, d’un Saxon ou d’un notable de tradition romaine?

Ririn Oktavia Sari – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • analisis faktor faktor yang mempengaruhi peningkatan jumlah siswa pada lembaga pendidikan non formal Briton international english school di makassar
    AKMEN Jurnal Ilmiah, 2017
    Co-Authors: Andi Widiawati, Ririn Oktavia Sari

    Abstract:

    This research was purposed to determine the factors of academic motivations, career development and corporate brand image which affect the increase of student numbers at non formal English course Briton International English School among the courses business competition. The models used in this research were the method of documentation, questionnaire, and literature study using Likert scale. The method to determine the sample was purpose sampling and the analysis method was multiple linear regression method. The results of this research showed the variables of academic motivations, and brand image had significant and positive influences in increase of student numbers at non formal English course Briton International English School, while career development had positive influences but not significant parcially in increase of student numbers at non formal English course Briton International English School. The results of this research also showed the variabel of brand image is the dominan variabel influences in increase of student number at non formal English course Briton International English School. The implications of this research was purposed to help the corporate to be able to maintain the brand image as the main marketing strategy, for example by maintaining quality and providing the service to fulfill the variety of customer needs in learning English as the challenges to face ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) today.