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Brittle Material

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K T Ramesh – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • corrigendum to multi scale defect interactions in high rate Brittle Material failure part i model formulation and application to alon
    Journal of The Mechanics and Physics of Solids, 2017
    Co-Authors: Andrew L Tonge, K T Ramesh

    Abstract:

    Abstract A minor error was present in one equation in the original paper, “Multi-scale defect interactions in high-rate Brittle Material failure. Part I: Model formulation and application to AlON” and in the corresponding computational implementation. The correction is provided here. None of the primary conclusions of the original paper are affected.

  • multi scale defect interactions in high rate Brittle Material failure part i model formulation and application to alon
    Journal of The Mechanics and Physics of Solids, 2016
    Co-Authors: Andrew L Tonge, K T Ramesh

    Abstract:

    Abstract Within this two part series we develop a new Material model for ceramic protection Materials to provide an interface between microstructural parameters and bulk continuum behavior to provide guidance for Materials design activities. Part I of this series focuses on the model formulation that captures the strength variability and strain rate sensitivity of Brittle Materials and presents a statistical approach to assigning the local flaw distribution within a specimen. The Material model incorporates a Mie–Gruneisen equation of state, micromechanics based damage growth, granular flow and dilatation of the highly damaged Material, and pore compaction for the porosity introduced by granular flow. To provide initial qualitative validation and illustrate the usefulness of the model, we use the model to investigate Edge on Impact experiments ( Strassburger, 2004 ) on Aluminum Oxynitride (AlON), and discuss the interactions of multiple mechanisms during such an impact event. Part II of this series is focused on additional qualitative validation and using the model to suggest Material design directions for boron carbide.

Andrew L Tonge – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • corrigendum to multi scale defect interactions in high rate Brittle Material failure part i model formulation and application to alon
    Journal of The Mechanics and Physics of Solids, 2017
    Co-Authors: Andrew L Tonge, K T Ramesh

    Abstract:

    Abstract A minor error was present in one equation in the original paper, “Multi-scale defect interactions in high-rate Brittle Material failure. Part I: Model formulation and application to AlON” and in the corresponding computational implementation. The correction is provided here. None of the primary conclusions of the original paper are affected.

  • multi scale defect interactions in high rate Brittle Material failure part i model formulation and application to alon
    Journal of The Mechanics and Physics of Solids, 2016
    Co-Authors: Andrew L Tonge, K T Ramesh

    Abstract:

    Abstract Within this two part series we develop a new Material model for ceramic protection Materials to provide an interface between microstructural parameters and bulk continuum behavior to provide guidance for Materials design activities. Part I of this series focuses on the model formulation that captures the strength variability and strain rate sensitivity of Brittle Materials and presents a statistical approach to assigning the local flaw distribution within a specimen. The Material model incorporates a Mie–Gruneisen equation of state, micromechanics based damage growth, granular flow and dilatation of the highly damaged Material, and pore compaction for the porosity introduced by granular flow. To provide initial qualitative validation and illustrate the usefulness of the model, we use the model to investigate Edge on Impact experiments ( Strassburger, 2004 ) on Aluminum Oxynitride (AlON), and discuss the interactions of multiple mechanisms during such an impact event. Part II of this series is focused on additional qualitative validation and using the model to suggest Material design directions for boron carbide.

Chao Jiang – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • on crack propagation in Brittle Material using the distinct lattice spring model
    International Journal of Solids and Structures, 2017
    Co-Authors: Chao Jiang, Gaofeng Zhao, N Khalili

    Abstract:

    Abstract With the rapid development of high-performance computing, Lattice Spring Models (LSMs) using a simple fracturing law demonstrate many prospects for simulating crack propagation in Brittle solids. In this paper, a comprehensive study on crack propagation in Brittle Material is conducted using the distinct lattice spring model (DLSM) with high-performance computing and physical tests on crack propagation in Brittle Material from this work and the literature. The relationship between the simple fracturing law and the fracture criterion based on linear elastic fracture mechanics is investigated for the first time. The work involved includes the correlation between the Stress Intensity Factor (SIF) and spring deformation, the influence of the particle size on fracture toughness, and the relationship between the micro-spring failure and the critical stress intensity factors. Our results indicate that the simple fracturing law based on spring deformation may be easier and more fundamental for understanding crack propagation in Brittle Materials than fracture-toughness-based criteria. The applicability of the simple fracturing law is further confirmed from numerical modelling of crack propagation and coalescence problems with complex pre-existing cracks. Our results show that models with an appropriate resolution can simulate the crack path reasonably. Finally, the advantages of using the simple fracturing law are highlighted through multiple dynamic crack propagation and three-dimensional fracturing.