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Buffering Effect

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Robert Kumsta – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • oxytocin and the stress Buffering Effect of social company a genetic study in daily life
    Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 2020
    Co-Authors: Maurizio Sicorello, Linda Dieckmann, Dirk Moser, Maike Luhmann, Wolff Schlotz, Robert Kumsta

    Abstract:

    : Social relationships are a crucial determinant of both mental and physical health. This Effect is partly due to social Buffering of stress. Animal studies suggest that social Buffering is mediated via the oxytocin system, while studies in humans are sparse and limited by the low ecological validity of laboratory settings. In the present study, participants (N = 326) completed smartphone questionnaires four times a day over 4 to 5 days, measuring stressors, negative affect, and social context to assess social Buffering. We found that under stress, participants reported a higher need for social company. Further, the impact of prior stressful events on momentary negative affect was attenuated by the perceived pleasantness of current social company. This social Buffering Effect was moderated by haplotypes of the oxytocin receptor gene, based on two well-described single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs2268498, rs53576). Effects were robust when controlling for gender and age, applying different data quality criteria, and even apparent in genotype-based analyses. Our findings demonstrate that social Buffering and its modulation by oxytocin system characteristics have implications for life as lived outside the laboratory.

  • Oxytocin and the stress Buffering Effect of social company: A genetic study in daily life
    , 2019
    Co-Authors: Maurizio Sicorello, Linda Dieckmann, Dirk Moser, Maike Luhmann, Wolff Schlotz, Robert Kumsta

    Abstract:

    Social relationships are a crucial determinant of both mental and physical health. This Effect is partly due to social Buffering of stress. Animal studies suggest that social Buffering is mediated via the oxytocin system, while studies in humans are sparse and limited by the low ecological validity of laboratory settings. In our study, participants (N = 326) completed smartphone questionnaires four times a day over four to five days, measuring stressors, negative affect, and social context. We found that under stress participants reported a higher need for social company. Further, the impact of prior stressful events on momentary negative affect was attenuated by the perceived pleasantness of current social company. This social Buffering Effect was moderated by haplotypes of the oxytocin receptor gene, based on two well-described single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs2268498, rs53576). Our findings demonstrate that social Buffering and its modulation by oxytocin system characteristics have implications for life as lived outside the laboratory.

Gerhard Troster – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • a time to trust the Buffering Effect of trust and its temporal variations in the context of high reliability teams
    Journal of Organizational Behavior, 2018
    Co-Authors: Michael J Burtscher, Bertolt Meyer, Klaus Jonas, Sebastian Feese, Gerhard Troster

    Abstract:

    This study aims to further clarify the functionality of job resources in the context of high‐reliability teams. Combining extant stress models with theoretical considerations from team research, we address temporal variations in the Buffering Effect of trust in teammates. We hypothesize that trust buffers the negative Effect of objective physical activity on perceived strain and that this Buffering Effect is more pronounced during later performance episodes (i.e., when employees complete a series of temporally distinguishable tasks). We tested the hypotheses with a sample of professional firefighters who completed a sequence of 3 performance episodes in a high‐fidelity simulation environment. Each participant was equipped with a smartphone capturing individual motion activity, which we used as an indicator of physical activity. In line with our hypotheses, multilevel modeling revealed a Buffering Effect of trust on the relationship between physical activity and perceived strain. Importantly, this Buffering Effect was more pronounced in the second performance episode as compared with the first performance episode. Our findings add a temporal perspective to the understanding of the Effectiveness of job resources. In addition, the current study illustrates the usefulness of smartphones for obtaining behavioral data in a naturalistic setting.

  • A time to trust? The Buffering Effect of trust and its temporal variations in the context of high‐reliability teams
    Journal of Organizational Behavior, 2018
    Co-Authors: Michael J Burtscher, Bertolt Meyer, Klaus Jonas, Sebastian Feese, Gerhard Troster

    Abstract:

    This study aims to further clarify the functionality of job resources in the context of high‐reliability teams. Combining extant stress models with theoretical considerations from team research, we address temporal variations in the Buffering Effect of trust in teammates. We hypothesize that trust buffers the negative Effect of objective physical activity on perceived strain and that this Buffering Effect is more pronounced during later performance episodes (i.e., when employees complete a series of temporally distinguishable tasks). We tested the hypotheses with a sample of professional firefighters who completed a sequence of 3 performance episodes in a high‐fidelity simulation environment. Each participant was equipped with a smartphone capturing individual motion activity, which we used as an indicator of physical activity. In line with our hypotheses, multilevel modeling revealed a Buffering Effect of trust on the relationship between physical activity and perceived strain. Importantly, this Buffering Effect was more pronounced in the second performance episode as compared with the first performance episode. Our findings add a temporal perspective to the understanding of the Effectiveness of job resources. In addition, the current study illustrates the usefulness of smartphones for obtaining behavioral data in a naturalistic setting.

Arnold B Bakker – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • threats of workplace violence and the Buffering Effect of social support
    Group & Organization Management, 2007
    Co-Authors: Ij Hetty Van Emmerik, Martin Euwema, Arnold B Bakker

    Abstract:

    Based on the perspective of the psychological contract, this study among 2,782 constabulary officers tested the hypothesis that threats of workplace violence lead to reduced job investments (i.e., affective organizational commitment and dedication). Multilevel analyses showed negative relationships between threats of workplace violence (individually experienced and as expressed in an unsafe climate) and job investments. Peer support was related to more job investments and buffered an unsafe climate, that is, the negative relationship between an unsafe climate and reduced job investments was stronger for employees with low levels of peer support. Experiencing an unsafe climate at the aggregate level by the cumulative experience of threat by employees can perhaps be thought of as facing a common enemy, and it has been shown that this has consequences for employees’ attitudes that can be buffered by peer support.