Building Physics - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Building Physics

The Experts below are selected from a list of 2298 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Carleric Hagentoft – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • reliability analysis in Building Physics design
    Building and Environment, 2008
    Co-Authors: Krystyna Pietrzyk, Carleric Hagentoft

    Abstract:

    Abstract The idea of reliability analysis in Building Physics design is presented. Reliability of Building performance is described in terms of the probability of exceeding the critical values by the physical measures as a result of the changes of physical state of a Building due to variations of climatic, structural or serviceability parameters. Demand–capacity model and the first-order reliability method (FORM) are proposed as a tool for the reliability analysis. An example of probability-based analysis of air exchange in a Building illustrates the use of the reliability analysis approach in ventilation design.

  • the international Building Physics toolbox in simulink
    Energy and Buildings, 2007
    Co-Authors: Angela Sasic Kalagasidis, Peter Weitzmann, Toke Rammer Nielsen, Ruut Hannele Peuhkuri, Carleric Hagentoft, Carsten Rode

    Abstract:

    The International Building Physics Toolbox (IBPT) is a software library developed originally for heat, air and moisture system analysis in Building Physics. The toolbox is constructed as a modular structure of standard Building elements, using the graphical programming language Simulink. To enable development of the toolbox, a common modelling platform is defined: a set of unique communication signals, material database and documentation protocol. The IBPT is an open source and available on the Internet. Any user can utilize, expand and develop the contents of the toolbox. This paper presents structure and essence of the library. Potential applications of the toolbox are illustrated through examples. (C) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • How Do We Implement Building Physics Knowledge to the Building Sector
    , 2005
    Co-Authors: Jesper Arfvidsson, Carleric Hagentoft, Ingemar Samuelsson

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND It is quite obvious, from the statistics covering Buildings with moisture damage cases in Sweden, that available knowledge in Building Physics design, in particular moisture design, is not sufficiently used. A lot of knowledge, design tools and suggestions for best practice have certainly not reached the every day designer and all Building construction sites. A lot stays unused. Reports are occupying the bookshelves of a few all ready enlightened, in some research groups and in the office of skilled consultants.

Sigrid Reiter – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Coupling approach in Building Physics.
    , 2011
    Co-Authors: Mathieu Barbason, Sigrid Reiter

    Abstract:

    Due to growing concerns in energy savings, architects and Building engineers need to decrease Buildings energy footprint. To achieve this goal, industrials have several tools and, among them, the two most interesting are the “Multizonal Approach” and the “Computational Fluid Dynamics”. The first one permits to obtain results over one year in a few minutes but it suffers from a lack of resolution and a bad precision. Indeed, every room of the Building is represented by a node in a network. The results are then calculated on the basis of this network and the temperature inside the room is supposed to be uniform. Thus, this approach is not able to describe thermal gradients inside rooms. This is a problem for numerous configurations such as atria or rooms equipped with a radiant panel or a displacement ventilation. On the other hand, the second approach gives very precise results but it is impossible to realize long term studies due to numerical resources. Indeed, it takes several hours to obtain results in one configuration but it permits to describe the thermal behaviour in details. It has already proven to be able to deal with several physical phenomena involved in Building Physics. Unfortunately, these tools are not use widely because of their drawbacks. But, their advantages could be combined with those of the Multizonal Approach thanks to a coupling approach. The perspectives of this new tool are very interesting. This new approach will be address in details. Especially, this coupling approach has to take into account the three main discontinuities between the two tools [2]. 1) Time resolution: the time-scale characteristic of the first approach is generally one hour while it is one second with CFD; 2) Space resolution: meshing approaches are completely different for the two approaches; 3) Numerical and temporal resources: the first approach is very easy to use and gives results within a few seconds while CFD requires experience, material and a lot of time before to give interesting results. This paper will address these three problematic and, eventually, a two-room example of this technique will be described to assess the interest of this method.

  • a validation process for cfd use in Building Physics study of contaminant dispersion
    , 2011
    Co-Authors: Mathieu Barbason, Sigrid Reiter

    Abstract:

    Growing interests in environmental concerns oblige Building engineers to develop new approaches and to get used to new skills. Among them, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) holds more and more importance. This technique can help to improve the comfort of the occupants but also to predict very early Building energy performance. Moreover, it is possible to study the quality of the air. This last point will greatly help Building engineers to improve sanitary conditions in various cases such as hospitals, clean rooms or even in classical Buildings. However, this approach is still new and need to be validated. Indeed, CFD is still new in the frame of Building Physics. This paper aims to prove the ability of CFD to predict accurately contaminant dispersion and to demonstrate the breakthroughs that CFD can bring in the near future.

  • A validation process for CFD use in Building Physics – study of contaminant dispersion.
    , 2011
    Co-Authors: Mathieu Barbason, Sigrid Reiter

    Abstract:

    Growing interests in environmental concerns oblige Building engineers to develop new approaches and to get used to new skills. Among them, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) holds more and more importance. This technique can help to improve the comfort of the occupants but also to predict very early Building energy performance. Moreover, it is possible to study the quality of the air. This last point will greatly help Building engineers to improve sanitary conditions in various cases such as hospitals, clean rooms or even in classical Buildings. However, this approach is still new and need to be validated. Indeed, CFD is still new in the frame of Building Physics. This paper aims to prove the ability of CFD to predict accurately contaminant dispersion and to demonstrate the breakthroughs that CFD can bring in the near future.

Angela Sasic Kalagasidis – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • the international Building Physics toolbox in simulink
    Energy and Buildings, 2007
    Co-Authors: Angela Sasic Kalagasidis, Peter Weitzmann, Toke Rammer Nielsen, Ruut Hannele Peuhkuri, Carleric Hagentoft, Carsten Rode

    Abstract:

    The International Building Physics Toolbox (IBPT) is a software library developed originally for heat, air and moisture system analysis in Building Physics. The toolbox is constructed as a modular structure of standard Building elements, using the graphical programming language Simulink. To enable development of the toolbox, a common modelling platform is defined: a set of unique communication signals, material database and documentation protocol. The IBPT is an open source and available on the Internet. Any user can utilize, expand and develop the contents of the toolbox. This paper presents structure and essence of the library. Potential applications of the toolbox are illustrated through examples. (C) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • ham tools an integrated simulation tool for heat air and moisture transfer analyses in Building Physics
    , 2004
    Co-Authors: Angela Sasic Kalagasidis

    Abstract:

    ‘HAM-Tools’ is a Building simulation software. ‘HAM’ stands for H eat, A ir and M oisture transport processes in a Building and Building envelope that can be simulated by this program, and ‘Tools’ describes its modular structure. The main objective of this tool is to obtain simulations of transfer processes related to Building Physics, i.e. heat and mass transport in Buildings and Building components in operating conditions. The tool is to be used as a research and educational tool for the investigation of the mechanism of the above mentioned processes and of the degree of their correlation when they are coupled. Using the graphical programming language Simulink®, the code is developed as a library of predefined calculation procedures (tools) where each supports the calculation of the HAM transfer processes in a Building part or an interacting system. Tools are grouped according to their functionality into five sub-systems: Constructions (Building envelope parts), Zones (air volume of the room), Systems (HVAC systems), Helpers (weather data) and Gains (casual gains). When all sub-systems are coupled together and solved simultaneously, the resulted simulation represents the highest level of integration in the HAM-Tools. The modular structure in Simulink, using systems and subsystems and the graphical approach, facilitate handling and control of a very complex interaction between different parts of the model. This thesis encloses a presentation of HAM-Tools structure, mathematical and numerical models that it is based on, selected examples of the application of the code and results of validation tests. As a part of the International Building Physics Toolbox, HAM-Tools is an open research tool and publicly available for a free downloading. Any researcher can use, expand and develop the contents of the library.

  • presentation of the international Building Physics toolbox for simulink
    Presentation of the International Building Physics Toolbox for Simulink, 2003
    Co-Authors: Peter Weitzmann, Angela Sasic Kalagasidis, Toke Rammer Nielsen, Ruut Hannele Peuhkuri, Carleric Hagentoft

    Abstract:

    The international Building Physics toolbox (IBPT) is a software library specially constructed for HAM system analysis in Building Physics. The toolbox is constructed as a modular structure of the standard Building elements using the graphical programming language Simulink. Two research groups have participated in this project. In order to enable the development of the toolbox, a common modelling platform was defined: a set of unique communication signals, material database and documentation protocol. The IBPT is open source and publicly available on the Internet. Any researcher and student can use, expand, and develop the contents of the toolbox. This paper presents the structure and the backbone of the library. Three examples are given to visualize the possibilities of the toolbox.