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Bunionette

The Experts below are selected from a list of 276 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Michael J Coughlin – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • The Bunionette deformity—evaluation and management
    Annals of Joint, 2020
    Co-Authors: Minton Truitt Cooper, Victor Anciano Granadillo, Michael J Coughlin

    Abstract:

    Bunionette refers to a painful prominence of the lateral eminence of the fifth metatarsal head. Evaluation consists of careful physical and radiographic examination, focusing on the nature of the deformity as well as other concomitant foot and ankle pathology. Many patients may be managed conservatively with shoe modification alone. However, in some cases this is not successful and surgical intervention may be considered. Successful surgical outcome is strongly tied to correct assessment of the deformity. A variety of surgical techniques have been described, ranging from proximal 5th metatarsal osteotomies to exostectomy. The aim of this article is to provide an overview or evaluation and management of this common deformity.

  • the Bunionette deformity evaluation and management
    Annals of Joint, 2020
    Co-Authors: Minton Truitt Cooper, Victor Anciano Granadillo, Michael J Coughlin

    Abstract:

    Bunionette refers to a painful prominence of the lateral eminence of the fifth metatarsal head. Evaluation consists of careful physical and radiographic examination, focusing on the nature of the deformity as well as other concomitant foot and ankle pathology. Many patients may be managed conservatively with shoe modification alone. However, in some cases this is not successful and surgical intervention may be considered. Successful surgical outcome is strongly tied to correct assessment of the deformity. A variety of surgical techniques have been described, ranging from proximal 5th metatarsal osteotomies to exostectomy. The aim of this article is to provide an overview or evaluation and management of this common deformity.

  • subcapital oblique osteotomy for correction of Bunionette deformity medium term results
    Foot & Ankle International, 2013
    Co-Authors: Minton Truitt Cooper, Michael J Coughlin

    Abstract:

    Background:Many procedures have been described for correction of Bunionette deformity. For symptomatic type I deformity, the authors have routinely performed a subcapital oblique osteotomy of the fifth metatarsal. The purpose of this study was to report the medium-term results of this procedure.Methods:This is a retrospective review of patients who underwent subcapital oblique osteotomy for correction of type I Bunionette deformity. Patients were evaluated radiographically and clinically. Sixteen feet in 14 patients were available at final follow-up.Results:At a mean 2.9-year follow-up, 88% of patients had good or excellent clinical result, 88% of patients had no limitation in activity, and mean pain score on a visual analog scale was 1.6 out of 10. Radiographically, a statistical difference was found when we compared the preoperative and 6-week follow-up fifth metatarsophalangeal angle; however, no statistical difference was found in the fourth to fifth intermetatarsal angle at any time or in comparison …

Minton Truitt Cooper – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • 〈 Clinical Research 〉 Subcaptial Oblique Fifth Metatarsal Osteotomy Versus Distal Chevron Osteotomy for Correction of Bunionette
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Minton Truitt Cooper, Michael J Coughlin

    Abstract:

    The aim of this study was to compare a distal subcapital oblique fifth metatarsal with a distal chev- ron osteotomy for correction of bunio- nette deformity. Materials and methods. Twenty cadaveric feet were randomly assigned to undergo either a subcapi- tal oblique or chevron osteotomy of the distal fifth metatarsal. Radiographic measurements, including 4-5 inter- metatarsal angle (IMA), fifth meta- tarsophalangeal angle (5-MPA) and foot width, were compared between the 2 groups. Results. Foot width and 5-MPA was significantly decreased in both groups with no difference between the groups. The 4-5 IMA was not sig- nificantly altered in either group. Conclusion. Decrease in foot width and 5-MPA was similarly achieved with either distal chevron or subcapital oblique osteotomy of the fifth metatarsal in normal cadaveric specimens. No sig- nificant difference was found between the 2 techniques in any of the radio- graphic parameters measured.

  • The Bunionette deformity—evaluation and management
    Annals of Joint, 2020
    Co-Authors: Minton Truitt Cooper, Victor Anciano Granadillo, Michael J Coughlin

    Abstract:

    Bunionette refers to a painful prominence of the lateral eminence of the fifth metatarsal head. Evaluation consists of careful physical and radiographic examination, focusing on the nature of the deformity as well as other concomitant foot and ankle pathology. Many patients may be managed conservatively with shoe modification alone. However, in some cases this is not successful and surgical intervention may be considered. Successful surgical outcome is strongly tied to correct assessment of the deformity. A variety of surgical techniques have been described, ranging from proximal 5th metatarsal osteotomies to exostectomy. The aim of this article is to provide an overview or evaluation and management of this common deformity.

  • the Bunionette deformity evaluation and management
    Annals of Joint, 2020
    Co-Authors: Minton Truitt Cooper, Victor Anciano Granadillo, Michael J Coughlin

    Abstract:

    Bunionette refers to a painful prominence of the lateral eminence of the fifth metatarsal head. Evaluation consists of careful physical and radiographic examination, focusing on the nature of the deformity as well as other concomitant foot and ankle pathology. Many patients may be managed conservatively with shoe modification alone. However, in some cases this is not successful and surgical intervention may be considered. Successful surgical outcome is strongly tied to correct assessment of the deformity. A variety of surgical techniques have been described, ranging from proximal 5th metatarsal osteotomies to exostectomy. The aim of this article is to provide an overview or evaluation and management of this common deformity.

Christina Stukenborgcolsman – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • the reverse ludloff osteotomy for Bunionette deformity
    Foot and Ankle Specialist, 2016
    Co-Authors: Hazibullah Waizy, James R Jastifer, Christina Stukenborgcolsman, Leif Claassen

    Abstract:

    Background. The typical Bunionette deformity often presents as pain over the lateral margin of the fifth metatarsal head. There have been numerous operative treatments described for this pathology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results after a reverse Ludloff osteotomy in cases of severe Bunionette deformities. Methods. Between 2008 and 2012, 16 patients received a reverse Ludloff osteotomy of the fifth metatarsal due to a symptomatic type II or III Bunionette that failed nonoperative treatment. We retrospectively reviewed charts, radiographic images, postoperative AOFAS (American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society) lesser toe scores, and the EQ-5D at a mean of 41.9 months (range, 31-74 months) of follow-up. Additionally, limitation in activities of daily living, pain, and patient satisfaction were assessed. Results. At latest follow-up, the mean AOFAS lesser toe score was 86.6 points and the mean EQ-5D score was 14.1. Fifteen patients had no or only little limitations. Fifteen out of 16 p…

  • minimally invasive osteotomy for symptomatic Bunionette deformity is not advisable for severe deformities a critical retrospective analysis of the results
    Foot and Ankle Specialist, 2012
    Co-Authors: Hazibullah Waizy, Gavin Olender, Farhad Mansouri, Thilo Floerkemeier, Christina Stukenborgcolsman

    Abstract:

    Bunionette, or tailor’s bunion, is a painful protrusion on the plantar and/or lateral aspect of the fifth metatarsal head. Until recently, there have been very good results reported in literature when minimally invasive therapy is used to treat this deformity. In this study, the authors critically review the outcome of patients operated by the minimal invasive technique. A total of 31 feet were retrospectively reviewed with a mean follow-up of 52 months (range 14-106 months). The results were related to the preoperative severity of the Bunionette deformity. The mean intermetatarsal angle IV/V was reduced from 12° to 7.5° postoperatively. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score showed good and excellent values (80-100 points) at follow-up in 16 (12 type I, 4 type III) feet. Fourteen (2 type I, 5 type II, 7 type III) feet were rated as satisfactory (60-80 points) and one (type III) foot with fair (56 points). Nine patients (5 type II and 4 type III) indicated that they would not undergo the op…

  • clinical research minimally invasive osteotomy for symptomatic Bunionette deformity is not advisable for severe deformities a critical retrospective analysis of the results
    , 2012
    Co-Authors: Hazibullah Waizy, Gavin Olender, Farhad Mansouri, Thilo Floerkemeier, Christina Stukenborgcolsman

    Abstract:

    Bunionette, or tailor’s bunion, is a painful protrusion on the plantar and/or lateral aspect of the fifth metatarsal head. Until recently, there have been very good results reported in literature when minimally invasive therapy is used to treat this deformity. In this study, the authors critically review the out- come of patients operated by the min- imal invasive technique. A total of 31 feet were retrospectively reviewed with a mean follow-up of 52 months (range 14-106 months). The results were related to the preoperative sever- ity of the Bunionette deformity. The mean intermetatarsal angle IV/V was reduced from 12° to 7.5° postoper- atively. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score showed good and excellent values (80-100 points) at follow-up in 16 (12 type I, 4 type III) feet. Fourteen (2 type I, 5 type II, 7 type III) feet were rated as satisfactory (60-80 points) and one (type III) foot with fair (56 points). Nine patients (5 type II and 4 type III) indicated that they would not undergo the operative procedure again. Our results show inclusive evi- dence that minimal invasive osteot- omies have a good clinical outcome in the treatment of high-grade deformi- ties. The best future option is to consider the classification of the deformity before a minimally invasive operation is to take place.