Calcium Cation - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Calcium Cation

The Experts below are selected from a list of 156 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Chi Sun Poon – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • effects of sodium Calcium Cation exchange on the mechanical properties of Calcium silicate hydrate c s h
    Construction and Building Materials, 2020
    Co-Authors: Yohannes Lim Yaphary, Florence Sanchez, Chi Sun Poon

    Abstract:

    Abstract Calcium silicate hydrate layer (C-S-Hlayer) is considered to be the fundamental building block of hydrated cement. The effect of sodium ions on the atomic scale mechanical properties of C-S-Hlayer remains, however, unclear. Yet, this information is critical for understanding and predicting the macroscopic performance of concrete structures during their service life. Herein, the intrinsic mechanical properties of C-S-Hlayer with sodium-exchange ions replacing some Calcium Cations were studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The interatomic interactions provided insights into the role of Na+ within the atomistic scale of C-S-Hlayer. It was found that Na+ did not significantly alter the mechanical properties (i.e., strength and stiffness) of C-S-Hlayer. The larger Cationic attraction on the interlayer water molecules seen in the presence of Na+ occurred due to the exchange of two Na+ for one Calcium Cation and resulted in a volume expansion of C-S-Hlayer while a stiffening of its interlayer.

  • Effects of sodium/Calcium Cation exchange on the mechanical properties of Calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H)
    Construction and Building Materials, 2020
    Co-Authors: Yohannes Lim Yaphary, Florence Sanchez, Chi Sun Poon

    Abstract:

    Abstract Calcium silicate hydrate layer (C-S-Hlayer) is considered to be the fundamental building block of hydrated cement. The effect of sodium ions on the atomic scale mechanical properties of C-S-Hlayer remains, however, unclear. Yet, this information is critical for understanding and predicting the macroscopic performance of concrete structures during their service life. Herein, the intrinsic mechanical properties of C-S-Hlayer with sodium-exchange ions replacing some Calcium Cations were studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The interatomic interactions provided insights into the role of Na+ within the atomistic scale of C-S-Hlayer. It was found that Na+ did not significantly alter the mechanical properties (i.e., strength and stiffness) of C-S-Hlayer. The larger Cationic attraction on the interlayer water molecules seen in the presence of Na+ occurred due to the exchange of two Na+ for one Calcium Cation and resulted in a volume expansion of C-S-Hlayer while a stiffening of its interlayer.

Yohannes Lim Yaphary – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • effects of sodium Calcium Cation exchange on the mechanical properties of Calcium silicate hydrate c s h
    Construction and Building Materials, 2020
    Co-Authors: Yohannes Lim Yaphary, Florence Sanchez, Chi Sun Poon

    Abstract:

    Abstract Calcium silicate hydrate layer (C-S-Hlayer) is considered to be the fundamental building block of hydrated cement. The effect of sodium ions on the atomic scale mechanical properties of C-S-Hlayer remains, however, unclear. Yet, this information is critical for understanding and predicting the macroscopic performance of concrete structures during their service life. Herein, the intrinsic mechanical properties of C-S-Hlayer with sodium-exchange ions replacing some Calcium Cations were studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The interatomic interactions provided insights into the role of Na+ within the atomistic scale of C-S-Hlayer. It was found that Na+ did not significantly alter the mechanical properties (i.e., strength and stiffness) of C-S-Hlayer. The larger Cationic attraction on the interlayer water molecules seen in the presence of Na+ occurred due to the exchange of two Na+ for one Calcium Cation and resulted in a volume expansion of C-S-Hlayer while a stiffening of its interlayer.

  • Effects of sodium/Calcium Cation exchange on the mechanical properties of Calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H)
    Construction and Building Materials, 2020
    Co-Authors: Yohannes Lim Yaphary, Florence Sanchez, Chi Sun Poon

    Abstract:

    Abstract Calcium silicate hydrate layer (C-S-Hlayer) is considered to be the fundamental building block of hydrated cement. The effect of sodium ions on the atomic scale mechanical properties of C-S-Hlayer remains, however, unclear. Yet, this information is critical for understanding and predicting the macroscopic performance of concrete structures during their service life. Herein, the intrinsic mechanical properties of C-S-Hlayer with sodium-exchange ions replacing some Calcium Cations were studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The interatomic interactions provided insights into the role of Na+ within the atomistic scale of C-S-Hlayer. It was found that Na+ did not significantly alter the mechanical properties (i.e., strength and stiffness) of C-S-Hlayer. The larger Cationic attraction on the interlayer water molecules seen in the presence of Na+ occurred due to the exchange of two Na+ for one Calcium Cation and resulted in a volume expansion of C-S-Hlayer while a stiffening of its interlayer.

M. E. Meyerhoff – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Photonic crystal microcavity source based ion sensor
    IEEE Sensors 2005., 2005
    Co-Authors: Swapnajit Chakravarty, J. Topolancik, P. K. Bhattacharya, Subhananda Chakrabarti, Y. Kang, M. E. Meyerhoff

    Abstract:

    An optical ion sensor based on the shifts of resonance of a photonic crystal microcavity coated with an ion sensing polymer is demonstrated. A 20nm shift is observed for perchlorate ion and a 5nm shift is observed for Calcium Cation

  • Ion detection with photonic crystal microcavities
    Optics Letters, 2005
    Co-Authors: Swapnajit Chakravarty, J. Topolancik, P. K. Bhattacharya, Subhananda Chakrabarti, Y. Kang, M. E. Meyerhoff

    Abstract:

    We have experimentally demonstrated a Cation and anion sensor by using short linear photonic crystal microcavities with an embedded quantum dot active region. The photonic crystal microcavity covered with an ion-selective polymer forms a submicrometer optical detection system sensitive to small changes of perchlorate anion (ClO4?) and Calcium Cation (Ca2+) concentrations.