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Calling Thread

The Experts below are selected from a list of 12 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

William E. Weihl – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • SIGPLAN Workshop – Pipes: linguistic support for ordered asynchronous invocations
    Sigplan Notices, 1993
    Co-Authors: Eric Brewer, Adrian Colbrook, Wilson C. Hsieh, Paul S. Wang, William E. Weihl

    Abstract:

    We describe pipes, a new linguistic mechanism for sequences of ordered asynchronous procedure calls in multiprocessor systems. Pipes allow a sequence of remote invocations to be performed in order, but asynchronously with respect to the Calling Thread. Using pipes results in programs that are easier to understand and debug than those with explicit synchronization between asynchronous invocations. The semantics of pipes make no assumptions about the underlying architecture, which enhances code portability. However, the implementation of pipes by the language compiler can be optimized so as to take advantage of any underlying message ordering a particular architecture may provide. Pipes also provide application-transparent flow control for asynchronous invocations and are able to throttle invocations from multiple Calling Threads. We present four implementations of pipes and show that the performance and space overheads associated with pipes are low.

Ralph Lecessi – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Use in MultiThreaded Programs
    Functional Interfaces in Java, 2020
    Co-Authors: Ralph Lecessi

    Abstract:

    Runnable and Callable are interfaces whose implementations contain computations meant to be performed in a Thread separate from the Calling Thread. The CompletionStage interface models computations that can be performed as part of a future chain. CompletableFuture is a class that implements CompletionStage, and also implements the Future interface. CompletionStage’s thenApply method accepts a function that operates on the result of the current stage. The method executes after the current stage completes, and returns a new CompletionStage that can be used in a future chain.

Eric Brewer – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • SIGPLAN Workshop – Pipes: linguistic support for ordered asynchronous invocations
    Sigplan Notices, 1993
    Co-Authors: Eric Brewer, Adrian Colbrook, Wilson C. Hsieh, Paul S. Wang, William E. Weihl

    Abstract:

    We describe pipes, a new linguistic mechanism for sequences of ordered asynchronous procedure calls in multiprocessor systems. Pipes allow a sequence of remote invocations to be performed in order, but asynchronously with respect to the Calling Thread. Using pipes results in programs that are easier to understand and debug than those with explicit synchronization between asynchronous invocations. The semantics of pipes make no assumptions about the underlying architecture, which enhances code portability. However, the implementation of pipes by the language compiler can be optimized so as to take advantage of any underlying message ordering a particular architecture may provide. Pipes also provide application-transparent flow control for asynchronous invocations and are able to throttle invocations from multiple Calling Threads. We present four implementations of pipes and show that the performance and space overheads associated with pipes are low.