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Calonectris diomedea

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Petra Quillfeldt – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • is sex specific mass gain in cory s shearwaters Calonectris diomedea related to begging and steroid hormone expression
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 2007
    Co-Authors: Petra Quillfeldt, Inga Träger, Kate Griffiths, Katherine L. Buchanan, Juan F. Masello

    Abstract:

    Mass differences between the sexes of dimorphic bird species often appear early in the nestling development. But how do adults know how much to feed a chick in a sexually dimorphic species? Do chicks of the heavier sex beg more? We studied begging in Cory’s shearwaters Calonectris diomedea, a species with heavier adult and juvenile males than females. We found that begging rates and call numbers were not different between male and female chicks, but parameters of begging intensity differed between the sexes in their relationship to chick body condition. For the same body condition, males had significantly higher begging call numbers and rates. Acoustical parameters, which were analysed semi-automatically, included the lengths of call and silence intervals, the minimum, mean and maximum frequency in a call and the number of frequency peaks within a call. We found no consistent differences of acoustic begging call elements between the sexes. Male and female chicks did not differ in the levels of the steroid hormones testosterone or corticosterone in the second quarter of the nestling period, and the mechanism leading to sex-related differences in begging rates for a given body condition remains unknown.

  • Is sex-specific mass gain in Cory’s shearwaters Calonectris diomedea related to begging and steroid hormone expression?
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 2006
    Co-Authors: Petra Quillfeldt, Inga Träger, Kate Griffiths, Katherine L. Buchanan, Juan F. Masello

    Abstract:

    Mass differences between the sexes of dimorphic bird species often appear early in the nestling development. But how do adults know how much to feed a chick in a sexually dimorphic species? Do chicks of the heavier sex beg more? We studied begging in Cory’s shearwaters Calonectris diomedea, a species with heavier adult and juvenile males than females. We found that begging rates and call numbers were not different between male and female chicks, but parameters of begging intensity differed between the sexes in their relationship to chick body condition. For the same body condition, males had significantly higher begging call numbers and rates. Acoustical parameters, which were analysed semi-automatically, included the lengths of call and silence intervals, the minimum, mean and maximum frequency in a call and the number of frequency peaks within a call. We found no consistent differences of acoustic begging call elements between the sexes. Male and female chicks did not differ in the levels of the steroid hormones testosterone or corticosterone in the second quarter of the nestling period, and the mechanism leading to sex-related differences in begging rates for a given body condition remains unknown.

  • Do Acoustic Parameters of Begging Calls of Cory’s Shearwaters Calonectris diomedea Reflect Chick Body Condition?
    Waterbirds, 2006
    Co-Authors: Inga Traeger, Juan F. Masello, Roger Mundry, Petra Quillfeldt

    Abstract:

    Abstract A previous study of begging in Cory’s Shearwaters (Calonectris diomedea) found that chicks convey information about their body condition through the number and rate of begging calls uttered during a feeding session. Parents delivered larger meals when chicks begged more intensely. Here we test whether acoustic properties of begging calls of Cory’s Shearwaters are related to body condition of chicks, and whether parents are responsive to changes in acoustic parameters. Acoustic parameters, which were analyzed using semi-automatic call contour analysis, included the duration of calls and silent intervals, the minimum, mean and maximum frequency in a call and the number of frequency peaks within a call. We found that, in contrast to the number and rate of begging calls, acoustic parameters did not reflect chick body condition, and were not correlated with the meal size delivered by the attending adults.

Juan F. Masello – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • is sex specific mass gain in cory s shearwaters Calonectris diomedea related to begging and steroid hormone expression
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 2007
    Co-Authors: Petra Quillfeldt, Inga Träger, Kate Griffiths, Katherine L. Buchanan, Juan F. Masello

    Abstract:

    Mass differences between the sexes of dimorphic bird species often appear early in the nestling development. But how do adults know how much to feed a chick in a sexually dimorphic species? Do chicks of the heavier sex beg more? We studied begging in Cory’s shearwaters Calonectris diomedea, a species with heavier adult and juvenile males than females. We found that begging rates and call numbers were not different between male and female chicks, but parameters of begging intensity differed between the sexes in their relationship to chick body condition. For the same body condition, males had significantly higher begging call numbers and rates. Acoustical parameters, which were analysed semi-automatically, included the lengths of call and silence intervals, the minimum, mean and maximum frequency in a call and the number of frequency peaks within a call. We found no consistent differences of acoustic begging call elements between the sexes. Male and female chicks did not differ in the levels of the steroid hormones testosterone or corticosterone in the second quarter of the nestling period, and the mechanism leading to sex-related differences in begging rates for a given body condition remains unknown.

  • Is sex-specific mass gain in Cory’s shearwaters Calonectris diomedea related to begging and steroid hormone expression?
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 2006
    Co-Authors: Petra Quillfeldt, Inga Träger, Kate Griffiths, Katherine L. Buchanan, Juan F. Masello

    Abstract:

    Mass differences between the sexes of dimorphic bird species often appear early in the nestling development. But how do adults know how much to feed a chick in a sexually dimorphic species? Do chicks of the heavier sex beg more? We studied begging in Cory’s shearwaters Calonectris diomedea, a species with heavier adult and juvenile males than females. We found that begging rates and call numbers were not different between male and female chicks, but parameters of begging intensity differed between the sexes in their relationship to chick body condition. For the same body condition, males had significantly higher begging call numbers and rates. Acoustical parameters, which were analysed semi-automatically, included the lengths of call and silence intervals, the minimum, mean and maximum frequency in a call and the number of frequency peaks within a call. We found no consistent differences of acoustic begging call elements between the sexes. Male and female chicks did not differ in the levels of the steroid hormones testosterone or corticosterone in the second quarter of the nestling period, and the mechanism leading to sex-related differences in begging rates for a given body condition remains unknown.

  • Do Acoustic Parameters of Begging Calls of Cory’s Shearwaters Calonectris diomedea Reflect Chick Body Condition?
    Waterbirds, 2006
    Co-Authors: Inga Traeger, Juan F. Masello, Roger Mundry, Petra Quillfeldt

    Abstract:

    Abstract A previous study of begging in Cory’s Shearwaters (Calonectris diomedea) found that chicks convey information about their body condition through the number and rate of begging calls uttered during a feeding session. Parents delivered larger meals when chicks begged more intensely. Here we test whether acoustic properties of begging calls of Cory’s Shearwaters are related to body condition of chicks, and whether parents are responsive to changes in acoustic parameters. Acoustic parameters, which were analyzed using semi-automatic call contour analysis, included the duration of calls and silent intervals, the minimum, mean and maximum frequency in a call and the number of frequency peaks within a call. We found that, in contrast to the number and rate of begging calls, acoustic parameters did not reflect chick body condition, and were not correlated with the meal size delivered by the attending adults.

David Costantini – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • individual variation of persistent organic pollutants in relation to stable isotope ratios sex reproductive phase and oxidative status in scopoli s shearwaters Calonectris diomedea from the southern mediterranean
    Science of The Total Environment, 2017
    Co-Authors: David Costantini, Bruno Massa, Manrico Sebastiano, Martina S. Müller, Igor Eulaers, Per Ambus, Govindan Malarvannan, Adrian Covaci, Giacomo Dellomo

    Abstract:

    Little is known about the accumulation of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and its consequences for seabirds in the Mediterranean basin. We characterised the plasma contaminant profile (polychlorinated biphenyls ΣPCBs; organochlorine pesticides ΣOCPs; polybrominated diphenyl ethers ΣPBDEs) of a population of the seabird Scopoli’s shearwater (Calonectris diomedea) that breeds in the southern Mediterranean (Linosa Island) and investigated (i) whether sex, stable isotope ratios (related to diet), reproductive phase (early incubation vs. late breeding season) and body mass explained variation in contaminant burden and (ii) whether they predict health-related variables. The predominant category of POPs was ΣPCBs contributing between 53.0 and 92.4% of the total POPs in each shearwater. The percentage contribution of ΣOCPs to total POPs ranged between 7.6 and 47.0%, while that of ΣPBDEs ranged between <1% and 22.1%. Near the end of the breeding season, concentrations of ΣPCBs, ΣOCPs and ΣPOPs were significantly higher than at the beginning of the incubation period. ΣPBDEs were higher in males than females near the end of the breeding season, while they were higher in females than males at the beginning of the egg incubation period. Carbon- and nitrogen isotope ratios and individual body mass were not significantly associated with any contaminant class. Mates differed in the concentration of POPs, but they had similar stable isotope values. There was little evidence for a connection between contaminants and blood-based markers of oxidative balance. None of the contaminants predicted the probability of a bird being resighted as a breeder the following year. Thus, although POPs were present at high concentrations in some individuals, our study suggests little concern regarding POP exposure for this shearwater population.

  • Individual variation of persistent organic pollutants in relation to stable isotope ratios, sex, reproductive phase and oxidative status in Scopoli’s shearwaters (Calonectris diomedea) from the Southern Mediterranean
    Science of The Total Environment, 2017
    Co-Authors: David Costantini, Bruno Massa, Manrico Sebastiano, Martina S. Müller, Igor Eulaers, Per Ambus, Govindan Malarvannan, Adrian Covaci, Giacomo Dell'omo

    Abstract:

    Little is known about the accumulation of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and its consequences for seabirds in the Mediterranean basin. We characterised the plasma contaminant profile (polychlorinated biphenyls ΣPCBs; organochlorine pesticides ΣOCPs; polybrominated diphenyl ethers ΣPBDEs) of a population of the seabird Scopoli’s shearwater (Calonectris diomedea) that breeds in the southern Mediterranean (Linosa Island) and investigated (i) whether sex, stable isotope ratios (related to diet), reproductive phase (early incubation vs. late breeding season) and body mass explained variation in contaminant burden and (ii) whether they predict health-related variables. The predominant category of POPs was ΣPCBs contributing between 53.0 and 92.4% of the total POPs in each shearwater. The percentage contribution of ΣOCPs to total POPs ranged between 7.6 and 47.0%, while that of ΣPBDEs ranged between

  • oxidative stress predicts long term resight probability and reproductive success in scopoli s shearwater Calonectris diomedea
    Conservation Physiology, 2015
    Co-Authors: David Costantini, Giacomo Dellomo

    Abstract:

    A major challenge in conservation physiology is to find out biomarkers that reliably reflect individual variation in wear and tear. Recent work has suggested that biomarkers of oxidative stress may provide an additional tool to assess the health state of individuals and to predict fitness perspectives. In this study, we assessed whether three biomarkers of plasma oxidative status predicted the following factors: (i) the resight probability as breeder in the next seasons; and (ii) the cumulative reproductive output over multiple years in Scopoli’s shearwaters (Calonectris diomedea) using a 7 year individual-based data set. Our results show that shearwaters having higher levels of a marker of oxidative damage (reactive oxygen metabolites) in 2008 had a lower resight probability in the next years and a lower number of chicks raised from 2008 to 2014. In contrast, two biomarkers of antioxidant defences (non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity of plasma and thiols) did not have any predictive value. Increased concentrations of plasma reactive oxygen metabolites, together with the significant individual repeatability over time in this metric of oxidative stress found in numerous studies, suggest that this metric might serve as a blood-derived biomarker for health and fitness perspectives in birds and, possibly, also in other taxa.