Calophyllum inophyllum - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Calophyllum inophyllum

The Experts below are selected from a list of 1902 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Aldara Da Silva Cesar – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Calophyllum inophyllum l a prospective non edible biodiesel feedstock study of biodiesel production properties fatty acid composition blending and engine performance
    Renewable & Sustainable Energy Reviews, 2014
    Co-Authors: A E Atabani, Aldara Da Silva Cesar

    Abstract:

    Recently, non-edible oil resources are gaining worldwide attention because they can be found easily in many parts of the world especially wastelands that are not appropriate for cultivating food crops, eliminate competition for food, more efficient, more environmentally friendly, produce useful by-products and they are more economical compared to edible oils. Jatropha curcas, Pongamia pinnata, Calophylium inophyllum, Croton megaiocarpus and Azadirachta indica are some of the major non-edible feedstocks for biodiesel production. This paper investigates the potential of Calophyllum inophyllum as a promising feedstock for biodiesel production. In this paper, several aspects such as physical and chemical properties of crude Calophyllum inophyllum oil and methyl ester, fatty acid composition, blending and engine performance and emissions of Calophyllum inophyllum methyl ester were studied. Overall, Calophyllum inophyllum appears to be an acceptable feedstock for future biodiesel production. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • Calophyllum inophyllum L. – A prospective non-edible biodiesel feedstock. Study of biodiesel production, properties, fatty acid composition, blending and engine performance
    Renewable & Sustainable Energy Reviews, 2014
    Co-Authors: A E Atabani, Aldara Da Silva Cesar

    Abstract:

    Recently, non-edible oil resources are gaining worldwide attention because they can be found easily in many parts of the world especially wastelands that are not appropriate for cultivating food crops, eliminate competition for food, more efficient, more environmentally friendly, produce useful by-products and they are more economical compared to edible oils. Jatropha curcas, Pongamia pinnata, Calophylium inophyllum, Croton megaiocarpus and Azadirachta indica are some of the major non-edible feedstocks for biodiesel production. This paper investigates the potential of Calophyllum inophyllum as a promising feedstock for biodiesel production. In this paper, several aspects such as physical and chemical properties of crude Calophyllum inophyllum oil and methyl ester, fatty acid composition, blending and engine performance and emissions of Calophyllum inophyllum methyl ester were studied. Overall, Calophyllum inophyllum appears to be an acceptable feedstock for future biodiesel production. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

A E Atabani – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Calophyllum inophyllum l a prospective non edible biodiesel feedstock study of biodiesel production properties fatty acid composition blending and engine performance
    Renewable & Sustainable Energy Reviews, 2014
    Co-Authors: A E Atabani, Aldara Da Silva Cesar

    Abstract:

    Recently, non-edible oil resources are gaining worldwide attention because they can be found easily in many parts of the world especially wastelands that are not appropriate for cultivating food crops, eliminate competition for food, more efficient, more environmentally friendly, produce useful by-products and they are more economical compared to edible oils. Jatropha curcas, Pongamia pinnata, Calophylium inophyllum, Croton megaiocarpus and Azadirachta indica are some of the major non-edible feedstocks for biodiesel production. This paper investigates the potential of Calophyllum inophyllum as a promising feedstock for biodiesel production. In this paper, several aspects such as physical and chemical properties of crude Calophyllum inophyllum oil and methyl ester, fatty acid composition, blending and engine performance and emissions of Calophyllum inophyllum methyl ester were studied. Overall, Calophyllum inophyllum appears to be an acceptable feedstock for future biodiesel production. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • Calophyllum inophyllum L. – A prospective non-edible biodiesel feedstock. Study of biodiesel production, properties, fatty acid composition, blending and engine performance
    Renewable & Sustainable Energy Reviews, 2014
    Co-Authors: A E Atabani, Aldara Da Silva Cesar

    Abstract:

    Recently, non-edible oil resources are gaining worldwide attention because they can be found easily in many parts of the world especially wastelands that are not appropriate for cultivating food crops, eliminate competition for food, more efficient, more environmentally friendly, produce useful by-products and they are more economical compared to edible oils. Jatropha curcas, Pongamia pinnata, Calophylium inophyllum, Croton megaiocarpus and Azadirachta indica are some of the major non-edible feedstocks for biodiesel production. This paper investigates the potential of Calophyllum inophyllum as a promising feedstock for biodiesel production. In this paper, several aspects such as physical and chemical properties of crude Calophyllum inophyllum oil and methyl ester, fatty acid composition, blending and engine performance and emissions of Calophyllum inophyllum methyl ester were studied. Overall, Calophyllum inophyllum appears to be an acceptable feedstock for future biodiesel production. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Shigetomo Yonemori – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • two xanthones from roots of Calophyllum inophyllum
    Phytochemistry, 1995
    Co-Authors: Munekazu Iinuma, Hideki Tosa, Toshiyuki Tanaka, Shigetomo Yonemori

    Abstract:

    Abstract From the root bark of Calophyllum inophyllum, a new xanthone named caloxanthone D and from the root heartwood, another new xanthone, caloxanthone E, in addition to four known xanthones [1,3,8-trihydroxy-7-methoxy-, 1,3-dihydroxy-7,8-methoxy-, 1,3,5-trihydroxy-2-methoxy- and 6-hydroxy-1,5-dimethoxy-] were isolated. The structures were determined by analysis of NMR spectral data including 2D techniques.

  • two xanthones from root bark of Calophyllum inophyllum
    Phytochemistry, 1994
    Co-Authors: Munekazu Iinuma, Hideki Tosa, Toshiyuki Tanaka, Shigetomo Yonemori

    Abstract:

    Two new xanthones, named caloxanthones A and B, were isolated from the root bark of Calophyllum inophyllum, in addition to known xanthones (macluraxanthone and 1,5-dihydroxyxanthone) and (−)-epicatechin. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic analysis, in particular, by 2D NMR techniques.

  • two new xanthones in the underground part of Calophyllum inophyllum
    Heterocycles, 1994
    Co-Authors: Munekazu Iinuma, Hideki Tosa, Toshiyuki Tanaka, Shigetomo Yonemori

    Abstract:

    From the root bark of Calophyllum inophyllum L. (Guttiferae), a new xanthone named caloxanthone C (1) and 4-hydroxyxanthone (2), and from the heartwood of root, a new xanthone 1-hydroxy-2-methoxyxanthone (3) in addition to three known xanthones [1,2-dimethoxy-(4), 2-hydroxy- 1-methoxy-(5)], and 6-deoxyjacareubin (6) were isolated. The structures were characterized by means of a spectroscopic analysis