Campgrounds - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Campgrounds

The Experts below are selected from a list of 234 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

James Shanahan – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Campground Manager and User Perceptions of Risk Associated with Negative Human–Black Bear Interactions
    Human Dimensions of Wildlife, 2007
    Co-Authors: Meredith L Gore, Barbara A Knuth, Paul D Curtis, James Shanahan

    Abstract:

    Negative human–black bear interactions in New York’s Adirondack Park Campgrounds pose risk management challenges. Communication is one tool available to modify human behavior and reduce associated risks, but knowledge of constructs influencing risk perception among key stakeholder groups is needed to design effective risk communication approaches. We interviewed managers (n = 14) and users (n = 40) at 7 Adirondack Park Campgrounds to characterize risk perceptions between groups. We identified eight constructs influencing risk perceived by users and/or managers with three constructs congruent between groups, and five constructs divergent. We discuss how congruencies and shared understanding across groups, and explicit recognition by risk communicators of differences between groups, may offer opportunities to maximize successes of risk communication efforts in Campgrounds.

  • stakeholder perceptions of risk associated with human black bear conflicts in new york s adirondack park Campgrounds implications for theory and practice
    Wildlife Society Bulletin, 2006
    Co-Authors: Meredith L Gore, Barbara A Knuth, Paul D Curtis, James Shanahan

    Abstract:

    Abstract New York State’s Adirondack Park is home to an estimated 6,000 black bears (Ursus americanus), about 75% of the state’s total population. Human–bear interactions at the Park’s nearly 100 Campgrounds are commonplace. Some interactions are conflicts that include risks to personal safety and property damage. Between 19 June 2003 and 18 August 2003, we interviewed 54 Adirondack Park campers and caretakers at 7 Campgrounds to determine stakeholder-perceived risks. We structured interviews to assess 9 possible constructs influencing risks not yet reported in the literature for human–bear conflicts from campground stakeholders’ perspectives: volition of exposure; certainty; feelings of dread; perceived frequency of exposure to risk; responsiveness of black bear managers; trust in black bear managers; familiarity of risk; natural causes of risk; and control over risk. Overall, perceived risk associated with human–bear conflict was low. Evidence-based analysis revealed 8 of 9 constructs to be salient. We …

  • Stakeholder Perceptions of Risk Associated with Human–Black Bear Conflicts in New York’s Adirondack Park Campgrounds: Implications for Theory and Practice
    Wildlife Society Bulletin, 2006
    Co-Authors: Meredith L Gore, Barbara A Knuth, Paul D Curtis, James Shanahan

    Abstract:

    Abstract New York State’s Adirondack Park is home to an estimated 6,000 black bears (Ursus americanus), about 75% of the state’s total population. Human–bear interactions at the Park’s nearly 100 Campgrounds are commonplace. Some interactions are conflicts that include risks to personal safety and property damage. Between 19 June 2003 and 18 August 2003, we interviewed 54 Adirondack Park campers and caretakers at 7 Campgrounds to determine stakeholder-perceived risks. We structured interviews to assess 9 possible constructs influencing risks not yet reported in the literature for human–bear conflicts from campground stakeholders’ perspectives: volition of exposure; certainty; feelings of dread; perceived frequency of exposure to risk; responsiveness of black bear managers; trust in black bear managers; familiarity of risk; natural causes of risk; and control over risk. Overall, perceived risk associated with human–bear conflict was low. Evidence-based analysis revealed 8 of 9 constructs to be salient. We …

Meredith L Gore – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Campground Manager and User Perceptions of Risk Associated with Negative Human–Black Bear Interactions
    Human Dimensions of Wildlife, 2007
    Co-Authors: Meredith L Gore, Barbara A Knuth, Paul D Curtis, James Shanahan

    Abstract:

    Negative human–black bear interactions in New York’s Adirondack Park Campgrounds pose risk management challenges. Communication is one tool available to modify human behavior and reduce associated risks, but knowledge of constructs influencing risk perception among key stakeholder groups is needed to design effective risk communication approaches. We interviewed managers (n = 14) and users (n = 40) at 7 Adirondack Park Campgrounds to characterize risk perceptions between groups. We identified eight constructs influencing risk perceived by users and/or managers with three constructs congruent between groups, and five constructs divergent. We discuss how congruencies and shared understanding across groups, and explicit recognition by risk communicators of differences between groups, may offer opportunities to maximize successes of risk communication efforts in Campgrounds.

  • stakeholder perceptions of risk associated with human black bear conflicts in new york s adirondack park Campgrounds implications for theory and practice
    Wildlife Society Bulletin, 2006
    Co-Authors: Meredith L Gore, Barbara A Knuth, Paul D Curtis, James Shanahan

    Abstract:

    Abstract New York State’s Adirondack Park is home to an estimated 6,000 black bears (Ursus americanus), about 75% of the state’s total population. Human–bear interactions at the Park’s nearly 100 Campgrounds are commonplace. Some interactions are conflicts that include risks to personal safety and property damage. Between 19 June 2003 and 18 August 2003, we interviewed 54 Adirondack Park campers and caretakers at 7 Campgrounds to determine stakeholder-perceived risks. We structured interviews to assess 9 possible constructs influencing risks not yet reported in the literature for human–bear conflicts from campground stakeholders’ perspectives: volition of exposure; certainty; feelings of dread; perceived frequency of exposure to risk; responsiveness of black bear managers; trust in black bear managers; familiarity of risk; natural causes of risk; and control over risk. Overall, perceived risk associated with human–bear conflict was low. Evidence-based analysis revealed 8 of 9 constructs to be salient. We …

  • Stakeholder Perceptions of Risk Associated with Human–Black Bear Conflicts in New York’s Adirondack Park Campgrounds: Implications for Theory and Practice
    Wildlife Society Bulletin, 2006
    Co-Authors: Meredith L Gore, Barbara A Knuth, Paul D Curtis, James Shanahan

    Abstract:

    Abstract New York State’s Adirondack Park is home to an estimated 6,000 black bears (Ursus americanus), about 75% of the state’s total population. Human–bear interactions at the Park’s nearly 100 Campgrounds are commonplace. Some interactions are conflicts that include risks to personal safety and property damage. Between 19 June 2003 and 18 August 2003, we interviewed 54 Adirondack Park campers and caretakers at 7 Campgrounds to determine stakeholder-perceived risks. We structured interviews to assess 9 possible constructs influencing risks not yet reported in the literature for human–bear conflicts from campground stakeholders’ perspectives: volition of exposure; certainty; feelings of dread; perceived frequency of exposure to risk; responsiveness of black bear managers; trust in black bear managers; familiarity of risk; natural causes of risk; and control over risk. Overall, perceived risk associated with human–bear conflict was low. Evidence-based analysis revealed 8 of 9 constructs to be salient. We …

K Michael – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • survey of hot water temperatures in Campgrounds elevated scalding risk and energy wastage
    Injury Prevention, 2012
    Co-Authors: Nick Wilson, J Jarman, B Brander, K Michael

    Abstract:

    Background Scalds from domestic hot water are an important public health problem in New Zealand (NZ). Aims We aimed to study the hot water hazard in a yet unstudied setting: that of Campgrounds. Methods Convenience sampling was performed involving 25 NZ Campgrounds. These were sampled during summer months over a 4-year period (2008–2011) and in five different regions. We measured the temperature of hot water in basin taps and in showers. Results There were relatively high temperatures for both basin taps and showers (n=82 samples), with 74% of measurements exceeding the maximum level in NZ9s Building Code of 55°C. But if a lower maximum level, as recommended by various agencies is considered (eg, 48.9°C, equivalent to 120°F, is recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics), then 90% of samples were too hot. A further problem was lack of cues as to which tap was for hot water. Colour-coding or word labels were partially present in 32% of basins and completely absent in 7%. For showers, the equivalent figures were: 4% and 36% respectively. Significance The excessive temperatures identified in this study warrant action by government agencies to reduce the risk of scalding, particularly for children, who are commonly unsupervised at campground bathrooms. Reducing this risk may be more important that legionellosis prevention (given the absence of good evidence of infection via domestic hot water). Reducing hot water storage temperatures will also contribute to more efficient use of energy and save fuel costs for campground operators.